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GENERAL WAR NEWS.

SERVIAN LIBRARIES. There has been systematic spoliation of libraries and museums in Servia by the Austro-Germans and Bulgarians. GIRL MESSENGERS. A fresh invasion of custom and tradition is to be found in the decision of the authorities of (he House of Commons to allow girl messengers to take the place of boy messengers for the Press Gallery. The new departure is due to the scarcity of boy labour. MARSHAL'S BATON FOR THE TSAR. General Sir Arthur Paget, G.C.E., K.CY.O.. commanding the Salisbury Training Centre, is on his way to Russia (says, the Westminster Gazette) with a commission to present to tho Tsar, on behalf of the King, the baton of a fieldmarshal of the British Army. AN ALARMING DOG. An officer who was ordered by tho Isle of Wight magistrates to keep under control a largo Belgian gun-haulage mastiff which ho had brought home from the front and wh had killed two goats, a sheep and a donkey, admitted thon on the night after the goat-killing ho slept with a large knife handy lest the dog, having tasted blood, should have the nightmare" and dream be was killing tho goat again A WARM JOB. Being anxious to servo their King and country, two agricultural-labourers recently visited a foundry to ascertain how they would like the work. Tho sight of the men perspiring and stripped to tho waist, removing the molten steel from the furnaces,_ ranch impressed them. "That's a hard job," remarked one of the investigators- "Yes," replied the other, keen to display his knowledge, "but it's nothing to the job of the chaps inside who aro pushing the stuff out'" . ... . i FATAL AVIATION ACCIDENT. A shocking aviation fatality occurred at Brooklands recently. A young man named Radcliffe, a pupil at the aerodrome, was making a flight on a Farman biplane about -.50. when, near the Byfleet end, the machine side-slipped for about 200 ft, and fell on a cottage just outside the aerodrome, in Addleston Road. The petrol tank contained about 20 gallons of spirit. This immediately took fire, the flames shooting up to a height of some 60ft, and the unfortunate yotijg pilot was burnt to death. The cottage was set on fire, but was not seriously damaged. AN "ANZAC" STORY. Trooper Bluegum, whoso letters homo have attracted widespread interest in Australia, contributes a characteristic narrative to the current issue of T.P.'s Journal of Great Deeds. "I once read in a history book about the English Army swearing terribly in Flanders. Well, if "they swore worse than the Australians, they were champions. I don't believe in swearing— unless it's absolutely necessary. But some of .our troopers were artists. That's why the Indians coined the following picturesque phrase, ' When shell come, Englishman run dug-out; Indian pray Allah; Australian say, Where the h— that come from ?' "

" ECONOMY." Two examples of extravagance were reported by Profeisor Caroline Spurgecn at a meeting to urge thrift held at Sunderland House, Mayiair, by permission of the Duchess of Marlborough. An assistant in a West End shop showed her a dozen men's handkerchiefs ordered by a' customer. They are fine hand-woven linen. " When the initials are on they will cost two guineas apiece said the assistant, adding bitterly, "and then they ask us to economise." The manager of the fur department of a big London shop said, " Although furs have never been so dear we have not been able to keep pace with the demand, particularly for women's fur coats. The number we are selling is amazfog."

PETROL FOR PESTS IN TRENCHES. Mrs. Stuart Menzies, writing in the • Daily Express, says nothing is so effective against pests as the common or garden petrol used on the motor transports. It is not always to be found in the trenches, of course, but while in billets a judicious application of this petrol. the lining of waistcoats, along the bands of pants and breeches, or among the folds of the kilts, will keep away every evil thing for soma days. The warmth of the body keeps the fumes of the petrol effective. The commoner and cheaper the grade of petrol, the better for the purpose. No pests of any kind can stand up against this treatment, and the beauty of the cure lies in its simplicity, and also its being within measureable distance of all who need it. GOLF BALL INVASION. British golf manufacturers, hard hit by the war, are to make a determined effort to capture a share of the American market. The attempt (says the Daily Mail) is made possible by the expiry, on April 11 of the Haskell patent under which golf balls are manufactured in the Un : *ed States. The Haskell patent, which killed the gutty ball, was not recognised by the English law courts, but was declared valid in America, thus keeping the ever-improv-ing British balls out of that country. After April 11 the market will be open, subject to the payment of a duty of 10 per cent, on rubber goods, which will work out at about 3d a ball. Cheaper labour in England will compensate for that, and ten leading British firms are sending representatives to tho United States or appointing agents to prepare the way for the invasion. LOUVRE TREASURES. Some mystery has prevailed as to the "place of safety " to which the art treasures of the Louvre were removed in August, 1914- It has now transpired that the 700 paintings, among the finest of the Ltavre, all the tapestries of Rheims, Chantilly, and Compiegne, and the rare furniture of the public museums, in all 42 moving-vans full, were transported to Toulouse aiU'.T the battle of Charleroi. The conservators of the museums did not in the first ii.stancc approve of tins measure of precaution. The director of the national museums, M. Marcel, and the conservators declared that the moving of the works of art was in their opinion useless, for, if the enemy took possession of Paris, they would, being perfectly informed of all that the museums had contained, exact either their return or their equivalent in value as a ransom. The works sent to Toulouse are still there in the cases in which they were packedBIRDS AND A MILITARY CAMP. The attraction of birds towards a light is well described in a letter from a soldier who is stationed somewhere in Scotland: — " When I was in camp," he writes, " I was interested in observing about 10 o'clock at night a large flock of golden plover hovering roun_d the camp, evidently attracted by the light win' '• shone through the white tents- Their general • behaviour was not unlike tho flitting to and fro of bats. They kept very low, but • none came in contact with the tents, till ,'' after midnight, when the atmosphere ,: cleared somewhat. During the night I - heard small birds twittering, apparently unable to locate their bearings in the mist. | .'} think these were mostly pipits and wa»; ;:/tails, and next morning' the whole place was dotted with pied wagtails, which were a.-; .Very tame. There were some 60 or 70 ■':".;■; searching the gravel for insects on the >.£ barrack square. All these birds seemed ; x : :. to be under the influence of the whit* tent* and the lamps which shone through ■ them,-' the whole having much the samo • effect as a lighthouse" '" .

A DANGER'S SACRIFICE. daucT" i C i ßtle J., an Anglo-American Ami d H*. ,ie6t P ! "J artiste in An ~ much as £1000 a or L he ''° 16 ° S been with "is^vifo ten years, 1S on his way home to EngJa,ld to join the Flying Corps. LAST MAN ON GALLIPOLI. According to tho latest report the last man to leave he peninsula and also the last man to leave the transport River C do before oho was blown up prior to ofV n V n U v'2V vas Pctt *- ofKcc '' Smith, ol the British Navy. All X-RAYS MARTYR. "There lis » real hero in the Civic and Military Hospital at Dieppe—a surgeon Mm works so incessantly with the X-rays that ho « killing himself. It was suggested that he might spare himself, but he shook his head, and said calmly, • It is 'or I ranee, and tho soldiers need me.' He works in pain, and knows what the and will be. HOW MANY FOR £3. It required a sergeant (to hand over the cash), a corporal (to hold the big pay ' sheets), and a private (to open the gate) . when a landlady billeting a soldier in a I London-suburb received the sum threepence! The soldier had only had one meal in the house during the week; therefore— tno thrceepeiico. WOMEN CLERKS IN SOUTH AFRICA. In order to release men for active ser-i vice, many institutions in tho Union are engaging women clerk?. Twenty began I work a few days ago in the Standard Bank, Johannesburg, while the Notional I Bank in that town is already employing ' about thirty. It is stated that some' 500 applications wero received bv these two institutions, Tho Government is also gradually introducing women clerks where possible. NO WEEVILS IN THE BISCUITS. A show case in thf. Natural History Museum in London shows how in past wars the soldiers' biscuits became rotten with the grubs of moths and other insects. In tho Crimean War it is said that a soldier could not eat his biscuit except in the dark. During the South African campaign hundreds of biscuits had to be destroyed. The difficulty has now been overcome by the use of moth-proof bakeries, and biscuits made during the" present war and placed in tho case show no signs of deterioration. SELLS OUT TO ENLIST. Mr. Herbert Heller, a farmer, near Guelph, Ontario, is making an enormous sacrifice to join the colours. He is selling at auction his entire farm, stock, and implements preparatory to enlisting with the 153 rd Battalion, which is being recruited at Guelph by Colonel Craig. Mr. Heller's two sons enlisted at the beginning of the war in the first Canadian contingent. One was wounded at Langemarck and invalided home, while the other was killed at Festubert. The father has been a successful rifle shot for years, and has been I in the Bisley team. I

SURGEON'S ADVENTURES. A man who has had his full share of warlike excitement is Surgeon Clunet, of the French Army, a son' of Maitre Edouard Clunet, the eminent authority en international Jaw. He was in the thick of the ficchtinß in Morocco in 1912, was at the battles of Charleroi and the Marne, obtained the Croix de Guerre for distinguished sen-ices in the Rheiriis-Soissons sector, and had ten months of the Gallipoli campaign. After this he was given a few days' leave and was then sent on to Salonika on the Provence 11. "e eiicaped the week, of this vessel and is now ready for further adventures.

FRENCH HAY BOOTS. Pari? has just discovered hay boots. It appears that tho military stores have run out of boots in small sizes— most in demand, naturally, for the French are not usually built on a colossal scale. Unablo, therefore, to give men properly fitting boots, they have been informed by circular that they can obtain serviceable footgear some sizes too. large, but accompanied by a gratis pair of extra socks. By doubling their socks, they aro told, they will be able to walk very well in large boots. But unhappily the socks do not "seem adequate, ahd so ' ay is substituted. If only you can get er jugh hay, indeed, the size of the boot is of no importance; you fill it as full as you like or can, and then apply your foot.

DEATH FOR STRIKING OFFICER. ' Two sergeants, Victor Battist and Paul Gallaguier, of the 103 rd French Infantry, were sentenced to death by court-martial at Marseilles on a charge of striking an adjutant. While returning from drill at Cap do Saint-Veran (Alpes-Maritimes) on December 17, the two sergeants lagged behind the troops and were ordered by Adjutant Antoniotti to hurry up and join the column on tho march. They gave insulting replies and stopped. "Thereupon the adjutant took hold of their arms to hurry them along. Sergeant Gallaguier then drew his sword and struck the adjutant on the head. At the same time Sergeant Battist gave him a blow in tho face with his fist. The court-martial decided there were no extenuating circumstances, and passed sentence accordingly. BUCKINGHAM PALACE STAFF. Almost, half the staff at Buckingham Palace have been "released" for duty at the front. The King still allows no wine at tab.e, and there is now a short, wartime menu. In dress the ladies of the Royal family have long shown an example of self-denial. Queen Mary also insists on economies in all the bazaars and other entertainments for charities which she recognises by her name or presence. In her own household the Queen takes great trouble to prevent waste at any time. Sho has curtailed many customary expenses. Ono of the many court institutions sho has reduced in cost, is the Royal orchestra. At Princess Christian's house in Pall Mall the door is now opened, not by a sergeant footman or any other grandiose Royal servant, but by a parlourmaid in a dark blue uniform. m \ BISHOP'S WIFE PLOUGHING, The question of female labour on farms has just been discussed at the annual meeting of the Ormskirk Farmers' Association. I Ono well-known Lancashire farmer stated | that farmers were only too anxious that j women should help in the cultivation of land in the coming season. Lady Derby was keenly interested in the movement for the employment of women in agriculture, and last autumn she alighted from her ( motor-car ono day, and as.yted the girl pickers to gather potatoes from one farm in the Ormskirk district. Mrs. Rawstorne, wife of the Bishop of Whalley, was daily learning to plough in order to assist in the movement. DOS TRANSPORT IN THE VOSGES. Several hundred Eskimo and Alaskan dogs, usually associated only with Arctic exploration and adventures in the frozen' wilds, are proving a valuable ally to the | French during the winter campaign in the Vosges. A dog transport service with [ sleighs keeps the front line supplied with munitions and stores, and assists the ambulance service; while other animals are employed by the Chasseurs Alpins on sentry duty at the lonely posts in the snow, on reconnoitring, patrol service, ariu message-carrying. Other breeds are employed elsewhere on the French front, Fifty per cent, of the war dogs have been wounded and about a quarter of that total killed.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19160422.2.81.29

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume LIII, Issue 16210, 22 April 1916

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2,423

GENERAL WAR NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume LIII, Issue 16210, 22 April 1916

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