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LAWN TENNIS.

PROPOSED WAIKATO ASSOCIATION. A further communication ban been received from Mr. De La Mare, the secretary of the Hamilton Club, relating to the application of the Waikato clubs for Separate affiliation with the New Zealand Association and the comments that have appeared in this column relating to the same. Mr. De- LaMare makes reference to the sub-association question, and states that the weakness of the case for the Waikato is the same weakness which would exist, in the case of an , unaffiliated Auckland body applying for direct affiliation with the New Zealand Association, and being assured from Wellington that it could organise as a sub-association precisely as it wished to organise. In reply to the comments made a week ago as to the circumstances surrounding the motion passed at a meeting of tho Now Zealand Association granting separate affiliation to the Waikato, and the subsequent rescinding of the resolution, Mr. De La Mare encloses a long communication from Mr. Fabling, who was at the time the secretary of the Waikato Association. Mr. Fabling admits that Waikato was granted separate affiliation by one voW, and then summarises the comments replies us follows: — "The Auckland Association was not aware that the matter was coming before the-meet-ing at all Such a statement is contrary to fact, and the officials of the Auckland Association know that it is contrary to fact. So far as I am aware, the Auckland Association was not advised by us. as we sent our application direct to the New Zealand Lawn Tennis Association. At the same time I am quite sure the Auckland Association was well informed of our intention, so well informed, indeed, that they had ample time to prepare, and as a matter of fact, did prepare, a circular setting forth their objections to our separate affiliation, and circularised all the associations affiliated to the New Zealand Lawn Tennis Association. Certainly the Auckland Association were surprised, but not in the manner your correspondent indicates. The Auckland Association received a shock, a most unpleasant surprise, when they discovered that the objections embodied in their circular did not appeal to members of the New Zealand Council, and a majority declared for our separate registration. The Auckland Association instructed its delegate, Mr. Barry Keesine- to propose a motion that our " affiliation be rescinded," and it was on the strength of tho Auckland delegate's statements, statements unsupported by facts, that his motion was carried. The reports do not show that objection was taken to the method of procedure, and I believe it to be contrary to fact that the motion was rescinded, as your correspondent would have us believe, "on account of our unconstitutional method of procedure." As to our methods, it is perhaps a question whether as a matter of courtesy we should have directed our correspondence to the New Zealand Association through the Auckland Association. It may be pointed out, however, that the body applying for affiliation had no official connection with the Auckland Association, whether as a sub-associa-tion or otherwise, and I am at a loss to knowwhy its application should be addressed through Auckland. As the question involved

an alteration of boundaries, the rules of th» New Zealand Association provide for reference to the association affected, and there -would bo no Question of fair notice even if the.Auckland delegate in Wellington failed in his duty to report. Evidently the New Zealand Association considered our procedure sufficiently in keeping with constitutional practice to consider our application.

At the same time, our position is not on a parallel with that of the Auckland Association. The Auckland Association has a delegate in the New Zealand Council, and he is in a position to advise. Auckland in any matter affecting the association, and as a member of the New Zealand Council the Auckland delegate has the privilege of discussing any applications before the council, and supporting and defending the interest of his association.

Had we been in a position to exercise this privilege, or had we in any way been allowed to give evidence to support our case, we should not have accused the Auckland Association ot intriguing behind our backs

THE LATE ANTHONY WILDING

Many and numerous arc the appreciations which have appeared in the English papers relating to the career of the late Anthony Wilding. Arrcns the number ia an article by A. Wallis Myers, who is recognised as the leading writer on tennis matters : —

lo the official penman in Whitehall he was Captain Anthony F. Wilding, R.M.— a rank to which, with characteristic persistency, he. an erstwhile civilian, climbed in a briel six months. To us who knew him intimately and will tor ever cherish his memory he was always ' Tony'—and could be nothing else. Elsewhere in this issue, I do not doubt, you will pay fitting tribute to his prowess as a lawn tennis player, to that combination of physical vigour and mental concentration which made him what he was the most consistent chami>ion of his epoch. There have been greater artists. The , younger Do-hen was better balanced, his tootwork was superior; Brookes had irore inherent genius, I'im a more inspired brilliancy, Barrett a. deeper Knowledge of court cralt; but, given a. last and hard court and that climax of physical efficiency and experience which he reached m.. 1913— his zenith year, to my mind—l believe Tony Wilding would have defeated a , n y Player the world has vet produced. And this opinion is shared by many sound judges—by my mend, George Simond. lor one.

.Or llding off the court it was my Privilege to see much, both in this country and abroad. There was something peculiarly appealing about his personality, a trankness and an ingenuousness which disarmed criticism and broke down reserve, He was so endowed with the freemasonry or intercourse that he was never rebuffed in the presence of Kings or Cabinet Ministers, just as, by the same artless charm, he could always get the best service from a dressingroom attendant or a railway porj- , ug never a linguist and scarcely a diplomatist—for he risked offending people by disdaining the usual courtesies— the quality of ingratiation was inimitable en his Continental travels. Staid frontier toll-mon. barring the passage of hi? motorcycle, relaxed before his smiles and his banter; hotel proprietors, far from being suspicious of the mud-stained invader who extracted them from bed in the dead of night, became his obliging servants, and seemed to resent the formality of presenting a bill. Was there a first-class player in a foreign city, immersed in business when he tooted gaily in, the visitor always managed to get him out on the court at once for an hour a knock-up. Some people called this dominating power ■ side.' Yet 1 am sure there was never any conceit or vanity in lony Wilding.

The untiring application which he brought to bear on his lawn tennis showed that he was conscious of his limitations: the tact that he never under-estimated his opponents nor joined in a prediction of victory generally voiced, revealed a modesty which none who knew him well ever doubted.

" Some tribute may be paid to the fine inspiration for physical training which he save on the Continent. It is no exaggeration to Bay that tie modern athletic fitness which is proving so invaluable to France on the battlefield was fostered by the example of Anthony Wilding. In the huge training ground of St. Cloud, where every youngster wielded a rocket, I have seen boys preparing themselves by bouts with a ->unch-ball and pre- i serving themselves by massage. Managers of i French teams were never tired of holding up ! \\ tiding as a model for physical zest. I have no j doubt this influence was exerted in other j countries. And may I add that it was their i reluctance to train and sometimes their abuse I of hygienic laws which always made him dis- ! like the Germans? It must have been this | contempt for the enemy that prompted him'l to move out on that fateful Sunday to the | dug-out at Laventie. Thousands of miles j away a bedroom, left untouched by a mother's wish since his departure, was awaiting his return. . . . But there cannot fail to be enduring pride in that Christchurch home.' I Mrs. Gordon Lowe also writes in glowing < tributes of Wilding as a man and his sad end from a woman's point of view. In the course of her article she tells the following •lory:—''l remember another instance of Tony's ' kindness of heart. One morning, quite early at Bordighera. I saw an old woman trudging along with a great basket of washing, obviously much too heavy for her. ' Tony's ' car passed me. and he waved a cheery ' good morning.' and his eye then caught sight of and rested on the old woman and her load a little on ahead Ho stopped tho car as he came abreast of her. ' Voulez vous allez on?' he asked her in execrable French. She pointed high up a hill to the right. i 'All right, jump up!' he said. His French didn't carry him so far. and, jumping out on to the pavement, he picked up the basket and bundled the astonished old woman and her load inside. ' Don't tell anyone, he said to me as I came up to them; ' they'd think I was such a fool!' I think everyone who reads this ljttle story would feel just as I did about him ! Only till one meets an individual so utterly blessed with the gift of giving happiness to others, coupled with an utter lack of conventionality, is it possible to tramp along in one's own slough of despondency without realising all the glorious possibilities open to anyone with the possession of both these things. He always said what he thought, whether he was speaking to a duke or a bail-boy. From his point of view nothing entirely natural could be impertinent or anything it shouldn't be He was the most natural person I ever met. Nothing ever seemed to have a depressing effect on him. and the way he took his defeat at the hands of Norman Brookes last year at Wimbledon made one positively feel the moral and mental sunshine of the nature that went to make the man Anthony Wilding." NOTES AND COMMENTS. The following is the wording of a postcard written by .A. H. Gobert. the French champion, to A. W. Gore, the former English champion - " Allow a French soloier to send you his best regards and ' love.' I am in splendid health, physically and morally. Hope you are also in good health. I suppose you are training hard with Barrett to get into good form for 1916' summer, and beat us again at Wimbledon. But I will be wanting very much one- or two years to get again into anything like decent farm! My best souvenir to H. S. Scrivener." The Belgian champion. J. Washer, is still alive, although he was recently officially reported killed. The toll of war has been heavy among members of the Leopold Club. Brussels, for out of ISO members of the club who volunteered for service last August 111 have been killed and 50 seriously wounded Among the number are many well-known pin vers. Tin's story, dealing with the almost incredible number of Russian soldiers, a ripen in La »:ii Tennis and Badminton :—A correspondent travelling abroad met a Russian whose ucQitaintance he had made at ? tournament. After desultory chat he asked !vm if he was in the army. The Russian said he was "Then why are you not fighting?" queried our informant. "Oh!" replied i; o Russian. " I am not called up yet. I jiu in the ninth million!" Froitzheim. the German champion, who is, of course, a prisoner of war at Dornngton Hall, England, is. notwithstanding his lavish treatment at the hands of his captors, ex tremely anxious to get back to Germi.ivIt will be remembered that he was a 'ne:r ;>er of the German Davis Cup team to viAmerica last year, and that on atto-nt>'ing to return to Germany he was capti.-ed on board an Italian liner. The matter recently toot rather an amusing turn, in that Froitzheim has endeavoured to make an international question of his capture, and laid the facts before the State Department of the United States. Froitzheim went to America as the official representative of the Gorman Lawn Tennisbund. and while 'here was the guest of the United States Lawn Tennis Association. He held that his visit was an official one. as it was made at the request of the Uniteil States Association, and in consequence he contended that it was the duty of the United States after he had fulfilled his part of the arrangement to see that' he was enabled to safely return to Germany. A reply was subsequently received from the State Department to the effect that theUnited States Lawn Tennis Association was a private corporation, and that Froitzheim's visit had no connection with the United Stales Government, and that it could take no action in the matter. Froitzheim held a commission in the German Army, and is nowbeing treated as a prisoner in accordance with his rank.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19150724.2.127.2

Bibliographic details

LAWN TENNIS., New Zealand Herald, Volume LII, Issue 15978, 24 July 1915

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2,202

LAWN TENNIS. New Zealand Herald, Volume LII, Issue 15978, 24 July 1915

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