Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

TOURING "ALL BLACKS."

TEAM IN AMERICA.

NOTES ON THE GAME.

[special

WITH TEAM.]

San Francisco, October 4. On Monday, October 6, the team left tho Manse Hotel, en route for the University, which is situated across the Bay at Berkeley. At the University a welcome was tended by Professor O'Neil. One thing that amused us in the speech of welcome was the fact that he kept calling us Australians. Mr. Mason, however, put him right. This was not the first occasion where the team has been called Australians, as when 'Frisco was reached, the Governor of the State made the same misfake. It will, therefore, be seen that New Zealand is not very much known in the States. After tha speeches the team was billeted in the various fraternity houses around the compass of the college. On the morning before the match, about 1000 students marched through all the streets of the city, armed with bells, mandolins, and every kind of instrument you could think of. The idea being to arouse interest in the game on the following day. The Second Match. To-day turned out beautifully fine. Again the convincing-ground was a dirt field, but it was not in such a bad state as the one on the previous Saturday. The game was not started till 4 p.m. so as to allow all the students to see the play. Before the team arrived at the ground the yell-leaders had taken their stands in front of the students, and as soon as the " All Blacks" got through the gate the following yell greeted them:— All Blacks! Rah, rah, rah, rah, rah, rah, All Blacks! During the progress of the game the' students kept up their yells and singing. The same players lined out the same as on the previous Saturday, except that Murray replaced McDonald at wing-for-ward. The change was a decided improvement. Gray went second five-eighths, McKenzie coming into tho No. 1 position. Cuthill went to wing three-quarters, and Stohr •to fullback. Play opened very willingly by the blacks forcing their way to the opposing line. The Californians brought the ball back by good forward play, but a free-kick gave New Zealadn a chance at goal, Stohr putting the ball between the posts. The kick was a fine effort, as it was just on the halfway mark. It simply electrified the spectators. From the kick-out Downing dribbled the ball to the twenty-five line, where, from a scrum, Taylor worked the blind side and passed to McKenzie, who feinted to pass, and scored between the posts. Stohr' kick went wide. Five minutes 'after, from a scrum, Taylor worked the blind side again, and McKenzie scored another beautiful try, his feinting passes fooling the opposition. The next three tries were scored by Lynch, McDonald, and Downing, Stohr failing at goal. Lynch's try was the outcome of a passing rush through all the backs. Downing well earned his try, as after dribbling the ball from halfway and picking it up he dashed over: 18—0. After the spell the Californians held their own. Play became rather willing for a time, with plenty of hard kicking in the scrum. From a scrum near halfway the ball travelled from Taylor to Cuthill, who put in a great run, dodging three of the 'Varsity in grand style, and scoring near the corner. Ho converted the try himself: 23-0. Dewar next shone out from the pack, and after a fine dribbling rush scored near the posts, Stohr converting: 28—0. The last score of the day was made by Cuthill near the corner flag, after a passing rush amongst the backs: 31—0. Notes on tho Players. McKenzie stood out on his own, his dodgy runs and feint passes working havoc amongst the Californians. His two tries were well earned. Taylor played a much better game than on the previous Saturday. He worked the blind side to great advantage.

Gray, Roberts, and Lynch did not show up too well, Roberts especially appearing to have lost a lot of his dash. Cuthill made one fine run, and altogether played a good game. Murray and Downing stood out amongst tho forwards, Murray being at the top of his form.

Dewar was very prominent in the dribbling rushes, and Sellars played hi 3 usual hard game. The referee was Mr. Reading, and he gave a very pleasing exhibition. At times his decisions were quite . right, too much offside play being allowed. The American teams seem to have a very poor idea when they are offside. They charge a man when they are 15yds offside. This game was played in 30 Inimites spells, tho Oalifornians being very obstinate.

The Third Match. On Friday the team journeyed back to hcadquaters at the Manx Hotel to play against the Barbarian Club on the Saturday. The day was a very hot one, and the players were not sorry to hear the whistle sound for time'. It was played on the same ground »3 on the previous Saturday against the Olympians. The dust was again very troublesome, and the rocks on the ground wore not the best of things to fall on. The Barbarian team played very well, and gave a better display than any other club so far. Amongst their players was a Christchurch boy, Tom Delamare, who played for the Merivale Club two years ago. He played the best game for them. The attendance was very poor, not more than 500 persons being present. Tho New Zealand team was altered considerably. Roberts did not play, Cnthill taking his place. Lovcridge replaced Cuthill at wing, and Atkinson, Graham, and Douglas replaced Wylie, Bruce, and Sellars.

Play was of a very even nature, tho Barbarians holding their own for the first quarter of an hour. Eventually, from a line-out, the forwards made a rush for the line, headed by Downing. Taylor picked up and passed to Graham, who ran to the fullback, and Downing fell over the line. Stohr converted. The next two tries were scored by Cuthill and Downing, the former starring, although it would have been better had he fed his wing. Stohr's two attempts failed. Taylor registered the next try by a very pretty piece of play. From a scrum near hallway he ran around the blind side, and beating all the opposition, scored behind tho ports. Stohr missed at goal. Halftime then sounded. On resuming tho blacks started off well, the forwards working splendidly. Finally, after several of the backs had handled tho ball, Cuthill scored. Loveridge placed a very good goal. Play from now on was not of a very interesting nature, the heat of the day telling on the players. Gray was responsible for the prettiest piece of play. He made a short kick, and, following up, secured the ball again and scored between the posts, Cuthill adding two points. The game ended with the score at 30 to 0 in New Zealand's favour. Gray and Taylor were easily the best backs of the day. Taylor's try being a brilliant piece of work. Lynch gave a poor display, his defending being particularly weak. Loveridge was turned out for the first time, but he did not have many opportunities. His display, however, was very creditable. McKenzie, at first fiveeighths was inclined to hang on to the ball too long, thus spoiling many likely scores. Stohr, at fullback, played his best game so far. His line-kicking -being very good. At goal-kicking he was very poor, only Etitting one over in six attempts. Cutill, at centre, was also inclined to hang on to the ball, but was seen to good advantage at defending. Of the forwards, Downing again stood out, while Murray and Graham worked to advantage. Douglas was the weakest of the crowd;

mL Some Stray Notes,

The best game so far was against Californian University, tho forwards, especially, giving a very good display. The dribbling at times was of a fcign order,

and the passing among the forwards was another good feature. After, two or three . more games the forwards will be a fast and heavy set and will prove far too good for anything in this country. The backs did some very pretty passing, and some individual efforts were also good. Up to the present the combination is not all that could be desired, the parsing at times being very poor for a New Zealand team. There are not the nippy runs in passing that is expected. On Wednesday next, with a grass field, it is hoped to remedy this and give the students the very best exposition of Rugby football. The manager, Mr. Mason, during the stay at the University, addressed a crowd of over 3000 students upon the social conditions of New Zealand and the university. He was listened to very attentively, and some of the facts about New Zealand seemed to surprise a goodly number of the students. After a half an hour's speed) Mr. Mason was given a hearty vote of thanks by the chairman, Dr. Barrens, 'the students showing their appreciation by giving one of their "yells. '

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19131111.2.8

Bibliographic details

TOURING "ALL BLACKS.", New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15454, 11 November 1913

Word Count
1,510

TOURING "ALL BLACKS." New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15454, 11 November 1913

Working