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THE LATE MR. JACKSON.

STRIKING TRIBUTES.

from BENCH AND BAR.

j MEMORIAL from grand jury.

Feeling reference to the recent, death of Mr. Samuel Jackson, senior member ox the legal firm of Messrs. Jackson and Russell, was made by His Honor Mr. Justice Cooper to members of the Bar and the grand jury at the Supreme Court. yesterday. His Honor said he thought it fitting to refer to Mr. Jackson's death for two reasons. First, because of the respect in. vrhich the late Mr. Jackson was universally held by the Bench, and by the profession throughout New Zealand, and, secondly, because of the unique position he occupied during the later years of his life, m that lie was the senior member of the h gal profession in the Dominion. Admitted as a solicitor in England in 1853. Mr. Jackson commenced the practise of his profession in Auckland nearly 60 years ago, and practised continuously up till the time of his death. By his absolute integrity and capable knowledge of business. Mr. Jackson had. His Honor felt justified in stating, possessed throughout- his long professional career, the confidence of the business men of the community. Mr. Jackson was recognised as a most reliable, and sagacious family lawyer. As a conveyancer and chamber lawyer he was eminent. Ho preferred that very important branch of his profession to the more public duties of an advocate and, therefore, ho was seldom seen lit the courts, but for more than half a century ho was familiarly known to the business men of the city and to members of the legal profession, and was held in high itsnect by the Bench. Mr. Jackson was distinguished not only for his capacity as a. lawyer, but also for bis probity as a ' man, The death of Mr. Jackson had severed one of tlx? last links of the chain which connected the past with the present is the community. His Honor was sure the grand jurv would jail) with him and the members of the profession in the tribute lie paid to the memory of one who through a long and strenuous life earned, and lustlv retained. the respect and confidence of all those wito had the privilege of his friendship. His Honor was sure that if Mr. Justice Edwards had been able to be presen* at the Court ho would have joined with him in the expression of sympathy which they extended* to .Mrs. Jackson and her family in this their time of grief. Lo:s to the Profession. Speaking on behalf of the Bar of Auckland. the Hon. J. A. lole, K.C.. Crown Prosecutor, concurred with all that His Honor had said. The late Mr. Jackson was the most honoured member of the profession. and was esteemed, not only in " Auckland, but also throughout the whole Dominion. No one who knew the late Mr. Jackson could be otherwise than struck by his genial and kindly nature, his ' helpfulness on all occasions, and his gres.t ■ example to other members of the profa;- . s-i-ori. The deceased gentleman was an: able leader, a wise counsel, and one of Auckland's best citizens. Though he wr s a sterling Englishman, he loved the laud of his long adoption, and Auckland in particular. The members of the Bar extended their sincere professional sympathy to the deceased's family.

Dr. Bamford, on behalf of the Law Society, remarked that all His Honor and Mr. Tole had said would find an echo in the hearts of every me.nber of the profession. They felt that- in Mr. Jackson a great figure in the legal world of New Zealand had passed away. They had lost not only the father of the profession, but also a -sincere and generous friend as well. The foreman of the grand jury (Mr. E. C. Smith) also paid a tribute, to the late Mr. Jackson, whom he bad ' known professionally for 20 years. Grand Jury's Memorial. Prior to the business of the Court being concluded for the day, the grand jury presented the following memorial to Hi's Honor :—

The gentlemen of the grand jury desire to place on record their sincere appreciation of the eulogistic and sympathetic . references made to-day by Your Honor on' behalf of the Supreme Court Bench, also those of the Hon. J. A. Vole, K.C. las representing the Bar of Auckland), and Dr. H. Dean Barnford (as representing the Law Society), concerning the loss to the legal profession and the citizens of Auckland by the death of the late Mr. Samuel Jackson, who, at the time of his death, was senior member of th« Bar practising in the Dominion; and, while endorsing- those expressions of appreciation and esteem, they feel it to be their duty on behalf of the business interest!' of the city, and .the public more particularly, to draw attention to the obligations we are under owing to the foresight and advice of the late Mr. Jackson.

One need . only refer to the benefits con furred on the aged and poor of the city by the munificent bequests to the Costley Home, the Sailors' Home, the Auckland Hospital, the Free Library, the Costley Boys' Institute, and other similar public benefices, to which we are indebted owing to the sagacious advice and public-spiritedness of Mr. Jackson; and those who were honoured with his acquaintance or his friendship always found him to be a gentleman of the highest integrity, honoured in his profession, and in his private and social life an example to his fellow-citizens, and a kindly, loyal, English gentleman. The gentlemen of the grand jury beg to request th.it Your Honor will be pleased to convey this, our memorial, to the relatives of the deceased gentleman. Signed on behalf of the grand jury sitting at Auckland this 18th day of August, 1913.— E. Cakavaj. Smith, Foreman."

His Honor intimated that he would officially forward this very proper and eloquently expressed tribute to Mrs. Jackson.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19130819.2.108

Bibliographic details

THE LATE MR. JACKSON., New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15383, 19 August 1913

Word Count
986

THE LATE MR. JACKSON. New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15383, 19 August 1913

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