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LAWN TENNIS.

MR. WILDING'S DEFEAT. 9 MANCHESTER TENNIS FINAL. WHAT PARKE'S WIN MEANS. [FROM OUE own CORRESPONDENT.] London, June 11. The Northern Championship meeting came to an end at - Manchester on Saturday. ■ Chief interest was shown in the final of the gentlemen's open singles, when J. C. Parke (holder of the Northern championship) beat A. F. Wilding (6—2, 7—5, o—B, 2—6, 7—5). It was a great match, and an equally great achievement for the Irishman,' as this is probably the first time the champion has been defeated on grass since he carried all before him at Wimbledon in 1910. In describing the play, the Morning, Post says:— "This match was played before lunch, as both men were concerned in tiie duuu*eo final, and also the challenge round of the mixed. Notwithstanding the early i start the stands were crowded, as everyone was anxious to see how the popular Irishman, who defeated Brooks last winter in Australia, would fare against the world's champion. The conditions were ' all I against good play, as, in addition to the heavy going, a high wind was blowing stiaight down the court. Both contestants, however, . rosa superior to all difficulties, and no one could have* wished for liner exhibition or a closer struggle. Wilding seemed to be nervous at the start, and Parke brought into play his'famous drive on every possible occasion, forcing ' his opponent to act on the defensive. Try as the New Zealander would to reverse the positions, he found the Irishman exceedingly difficult to depose. Indeed, for the whole of the first set, and up to in tho second, Parke was immeasurably his superior at all points. At this stage there seemed to be more than an outside chance of the champion sustaining a crushing defeat. However, this was not to be, as Parke momentarily lost his strength, and, with several of his best shots hitting the tape and falling on the wrong side of the net, he began to play wildly. Wilding was quick to seize his opportunity, and, advancing to the net, assumed control for tho first time in the match! It then became a question as to whether Parke would be able to recover his} form in time to 1 save the set. This he soon showed be could do, as, after dropping four games, ho played as well as ever. There was a tremendous fight for the eleventh game, and after being behind at love—-40, Wilding pulled up to deuce. A very doubtful decision was then given against him. and; he lost the game by serving a double fault, Parke reached 30— in the following game, and then missed an easy smash, but made no mistake about the next two points, becoming two sets up. '■'"■'_ The third set was perhaps the best of the five, as the winning or losing of it meant so much to both men, and in consequence every ace was hotly contested. The score gradually mounted to six all. In the 13th game Parke had the 'vantage point, and was in position at the net/ but Wilding passed him cleverly on the back hand, and eventually secured the game. Parke had another chance in the next game, as 'vantage was again called in his favour, but he served a double fault, and the set went, to his opponent. Wilding monopolised the fourth set, his driving and volleying being brilliant in the. extreme, and, although Parke struggled hard for the first four games, he could make little headway against the champion's display. Wilding led at I—o, 2—l, and 3—2, in the fifth set, and nearly went to 4-—2, but Parke saved the situation and secured the game with a beautiful lob-volley. After this the- Irishman was never led,- and although the match ran -into 'vantage games, he always seemed to have a little in hand. The winner thoroughly deserved his victory, as, except for a few games,in the secondXset, his tennis was of a very high order." , • Writing in the Daily Chronicle,' "Saracen" says:—" Wilding has not played in a.tournament before this year, but he always keeps himself splendidly fit, and in his matches, prior to opposing Parke no loss of form was noted. This victory by Parke, gratifying as it must have been in a personal sense, is of great importance to England in view of the Davis Cup contest. With C. P. Dixon in such fine form, it only remained for Parke to be at his best for two very strong players to be available for the singles. The Irishman on Saturday proved that he is more accomplished than was tho* ght by rcost people before he went to Australia. Indeed, he must now be considered one 'of the world's foremost players, and with Dixon's strong help the Davis Cup should be retained." Other results were— Gentlemen's Open Doubles (northern championship): Final—A. F. Wild in"- and X. Casdagli beat J. C. Parke and A E Beamish (6—2, I—6, 6—2). All England Mixed Doubles (championship) : Challenge round—J. C. Parke and Mrs. Larcombe (holders) beat A. F. Wilding and Mrs. Lambert Chamber* (6—o, 6—3). " "

VISIT OF GERMAN TEAM. [FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.] Sydney, July 12. New Zealand is recognised as the home of many skilful devotees of lawn tennis. A visitor to the Dominion is agreeably struck by the extent to which the game is practised there. It will consequently be of interest to New Zcalanders to learn that, following upon the visit of the British Isles team, which left the Davis Cup in Australasia, there is an excellent prospect of a visit, to these latitudes bv a team of crack players from the* Continent. Inquiries made for some months past on behalf of the Australasian Lawn Tennis Association, have resulted in the receipt of a cablegram to the effect that while France cannot send a team to Australasia in the near future, a strong German side will probably be available for a tour. The association has in consequence decided to send a formal invitation for a team representing Germany to tour Australia, and it is taken for granted that this invitation will be followed by an enlargement of the invitation, so that the Continental visitors will play in New Zealand too under official auspices. It is said to be almost certain that the invitation will be accepted. Lovers of tennis on this side are already canvassing the prospects of a renewal of Australasian laurels in well-fought games with European champions..

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19130726.2.128.13

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15363, 26 July 1913

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1,075

LAWN TENNIS. New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15363, 26 July 1913

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