Default

Default

Default

This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE HOUSEWIVES' UNION.

ITP AMiiA a ivtn ■ nr* A I <»

ITS AIMS AMD IDEALS. Op the several women's societies whi<B» Have come into existence in this country during the last few years, perhaps the least known is the Housewives' Union, and jet it ia a society which concern* itself more with matters which are of vital importance to all wives and mothers, and which is planned to include more women than any other club or society in New Zealand. It is often held up as a reproach to women that, .having hod the vote for 20 years, they have not bestirred themselves more in poetical and municipal affairs which affect them as a whole; and it vivs with the idea of inducing mors vo >icit to take an active part in civic affairs the Housewives' Union w?i6 oiiginaDy formed. The union is not a purely local affair; its correct title is the Housewives' Uruon of New Zealand, and it has office-bearers and branches in the big centres. But the society is at present only in its infancy, and is casting about for a means by which it may increase its membership a.nd proportionately its sphere of influence. The primary object of the union is to organise the women in the cities and to carry on a continuous "campaign formut«al improvement amongst housewives. Th« secretary of the union told .a Her&i® representative Coat the union ooaraidefod that the value of woman's work in connection with citizenship . was _ not fußy realised ♦'Women," she said, "make quite as good and useful citizens as do men when they understand fully wb&fc their duties are. 'l"he Housewives' Unio:r seeks to promote the good citizenship of women, and to induce them to take a more active share in ail educational, commercial, and political affairs that are of special importance to the family life of New Zealand. We also want to organise lae voting power of women in such a . manner as to make them the most, potent factors possible in the support *.f suck public measures, both in municipal and in national matters, as are of importance to women, and especially to secure equality, regardless of eex, both in rights and opportunities as related to the family, to property, to industry and tirade, and to the State." The high cost of living is a matter m which the Housewives' Union is concerning itself. The Auckland branch recently took the step of writing to the City Council -with reference to a proposed municipal market. Hie branch also proposes, if possible, to make a special study of the causes of th© great increase m the cost of. living, . and to co-operate to take advantage of the result of such study in the effort to establish and maintain just and rational prices in all household supplies. "The union sets its face sternly against the purchase or use of any of the profluots of 'sweated labour 1 ," the secretary remarked. "Of course, it is not alwavs ascertainable whether or no.an article » the product, of a sweated industry ; lrat t where possible the union intends making - inquiries and will. establish a scheme off mutual protection against the innocent. buying of such product, and ,also , gainst the purchase of impure food or medicines or shoddy goods." ■ •• / ■■ ... . ' Other activities of the union win include much work in connection with the physical and moral well-being of the rising Iteration.. The name "HousewiW Union," has misled many people into thinking that the society » merely a Whopping circle or a dub to, domestic servant problem. Bat the name was chosen with the idtea that the portion of New Zealand women be' broueht under the heading <* . hoctiw- / wife." And what the union is earning as ia to include as many women in its rwiks as is possible, and to so carry' the ideas, «nd to «* revised the w«att which led to its origination. ; ,

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count
646

THE HOUSEWIVES' UNION. New Zealand Herald, Volume L, Issue 15240, 1 March 1913

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.

Working