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NEW ZEALANDERS AT HOME

[FROM OUR OWN" CORRESrOSTDEXTS.]

London, October 25. Mr. and Mrs. N. Alfred Nathan and their daughters are going back to Auckland at an early date.

No fewer than 631 fellows and 24 associates were elected to the Royal Colonial Institute at the first meeting of the season. Fourteen are. New Zealandeis.

Mrs. Russell (Auckland) and Miss Sydney Russell will reside at 13, Queensbury Place, until March, when, the Earl and Countess of Ilardwieke will return to London.

Mr. Thomas Allen (Auckland) is once more on his way to New Zealand. He is travelling via Switzerland, the French Riviera, and Italy, and bo will join the s.s. Otway in January.

Dr. S. H. Hay, late of Rotorua, expects to spend two years on this side of the world., devoting some of his time to a post-graduate course at the Middlesex Hospital- Just now he is acting resident medical officer at tho hospital for nervous diseases, Maida Vale.

Lady Mills will remain in England while Sir James is on his present visit to New Zealand. Their son has passed from Eton for Cambridge, but as he is 100 young to enter the University lie is spending a year under a private tutor. Miss Geraldine Mills is also in England with her mother at Princes Gate.

Major T. W. McDonald is at present at the Mounted Infantry School at Longmoor, in Hampshire. At the last examination in part 1 (tactical fitness to command) for promotion to the rank of lieutenantcolonel, Major McDonald headed the list for the whole Empire, and he has also successfully passed the. practical side of the examination.

Mrs. James T. Pursaill (who will be better recognised as Miss Irene Ainsley, the successful contralto from Auckland) is a leading member of Mr. Joseph O'Mara's lately formed opera company, with which she has signed a nine months' contract, to take principal contralto parts. Her husband is tho principal baritone, and her sister is also a member of this enterprise.

His colleagues in the New Zealand Shipping Company, and the New Zealand colony in London generally, were much shocked to hear of the death of Mr. Joseph Gould, which' occurred on Tuesday at his residence, 43, Cadogan Place. Mr. Gould was the eldest son of the late Mr. George Gould, of Christchurch, and had been in London since 1904 as representative of the New Zealand board on the London board of the New Zealand Shipping Company. lie had intended shortly revisiting New Zesdand. He is survived by Mrs. Gould, but there is no family.

Callers at the London office of the New Zealand Government this week have been: Mr. G. M. Scott (Dunedin), Mr. H. H. Scott (Dunedin), Major T. W. McMcDonald (Wellington) and Mrs. McDonald, Mr. F. W. Boys (Hawera), MrOscar Monrad (Palmerston North), Mr. and Mrs. Monrad and three children. Major Burnett-Stuart, Mr. Olaf E. Stout (Wellington), Mr. J. A. Brown (Dunedin), Mr. 11. G. Magill (Napier), Mr. and Mrs. W. F. Barraud (Wellington), Miss Barraud and Miss Wright, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Graham (Wellington).

Mies Marjorie Day, a young actress who belongs to Auckland., but who came to London some years ago to study for the stage, lias the leading part in Tantrums," which may be described as an up-to-date version of "The Taming of the Shrew." The unmanageable and fiery young heroine of this new comedy is called "Virginia Halstead," the pretty and piquant daughter of a wealthy soap manufacturer of Liverpool. The "part is very intelligently played by Miss Day. She has. a very attractive ap,i*arance, she is a vivacious actress, and there is not a critic who has anything but compliment to pay her for her part in "Tantrums." She is on the stage practically from beginning to end, and the part is by no means a light one. The Times says: "Miss Marjorie Day was not without vivacity, but it was uphill work for both of them" (including Mr. Charles Maude). The Morning Post: " Virginia has an attractive exponent in Miss Marjorie Day." The Standard refers to "the pretty performance of Miss Day. whoso charm and freshness smoothed over various rocky places and many a poor phrasefor the dialogue is not the strong part of the piece."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19121202.2.8

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIX, Issue 15164, 2 December 1912

Word Count
707

NEW ZEALANDERS AT HOME New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIX, Issue 15164, 2 December 1912

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