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THE MINISTRY DEFECTED

FtiRTWE VOTES TO THIRT#HRIE

THE PRIME MINISTER'S RESIGNATION.

IN THE HANDS OF THE GOVERNOR.

MR. MASSEY "SENT FOR."

ASKED TO FORMA CABINET

THE RESPONSIBILITY ACCEPTED.

; The Mackenzie Government was defeated in the House of . Representatives "on Saturday morning on - the no-confidence amendment to the Address-in-Reply to the Governor's Speech, moved by Mr. W. F. Massey, Leader of the Opposition, on Tuesday last. , '■~'■ ■■':"■[■ .'.'■■ When Mr. Massey's amendment was put to the vote, 41 members voted in the Opposition lobby and 33 in the Government lobby, giving a majority of eight against, the Government. As the result of the defeat of his Ministry, Mr. T. Mackenzie tendered his resignation as Prime Minister to His Excellency the Governor on Saturday afternoon, and, in the form usual on such occasions, recommended the Governor to send for Mi*. Arassey. The Governor, who had previously received the decision of the House from the hands of the Speaker, immediately "sent for"- Mr. Massey, aud asked him to form a Ministry. Mr. Massey replied accepting the responsibility. The feature of the closing stages of the debate in.the House of Representatives was a bitter attack by Hon. R. McKenzie ex-Minister for Public Works, on Mr. T. Mackenzie, Mr. A. M. Myers, and other Ministers. The 41 members who expressed want of confidence in the Government included five who voted with the Ward Government in February last: The Hon. J. A. Millar (Dunedin West), Mr. V. 11. Reed (Bay of Islands), Mr. .J. G. Coates (Kaipgra), Mr. T. W. Rhodes (Thames), and Mr. E. 11. Clark (Chalmers). Two members of Mr. Massey's party were absent, Mr. W. H. Hemes (Tauranga), who is expected to arrive in Wellington from England to-morrow, and Mr. E. P. Lee (Oamaru), who was paired with Mr. J. Craigie (Timaru). Mr. ... R. McKenzie did not vote and Mr, Ngata had not reached .Wellington when the division was taken., ' ■ .'■;../".'■■'.- ■ _ ~,' '■:..; '' '.■;.. The House,of Representatives' has adjourned till to-morrow afternoon, when ; Mr. Mackenzie /will intimate his resignation and the resignation of his Ministry, and Mr. Massey will ask for an adjournment for a few days to enable him to form his' Cabinet. .. ■ . Full details of the final scenes in the House, and other interesting news bearing on the political situation, are; given below.

THE FINAL SCENE,

EXCITEMENT IN THE HOUSE. ■- v

i liberal's demoralised,

THE MIDNIGHT SHOCK.

FOLLOWED BY A CRUSHING . DEFEAT. [by telegraph— cobrespondext.] Wellington, Saturday. The end of the Continuous Ministry came at:ten minutes to five o'clock this morning, when by a majority of eight votes the Reform party established its right to the Treasury benches.. The critical point-of the Opposition, attack was reached just before midnight on Friday, when Mr. Hindmarsh, the Labour member "for Wellington South,, mbvM-the adjournment of the debate arid the Ministerial supporters began to have . visions "of home and bed. Mr.. Isitt seconded .the mot-ion, thereby, losing 'his ■ right to 'mike a speech. The question of adjournment was put to the House on the voices, and the Speaker said he ■ thought -the/'ayes" had" it. Mr. Massey. challenged the deci::sion in .the usual ..manner. . " The '■* noes' ■• have it/* he said. Then came the divisionr on the question of adjournment, which resulted in 33 votes ;i or. adjournment and

39- votes against. Messrs.' Coaiesr (Kaipara), T., W. Rhodes (Thames), T. Reed (Bay of Islands), voted with the Opposition, Mr,; Lee (Oaonaru.) and Mr. Craigie (Timaru) were paired. Mr. Poland was in the building, but was locked ,out. , Mr. Millar (Dunedin West) and Mr. Clark (Chalmers) were not in the House. Mr.' Sykes (Masterton), who through illness had been' absent from recent sittings, reappeared amongst the Opposition members, a Jnote-soarf protecting his swollen throat. At the door of the lobby on the Gpyemiaent side stood Mr. Sidey {Diine>din South) who had been hauled from bed to vote.*" Mr. Sykes;waa smiling and glad, Mr. Sidey looked sad, . : - ;- k - -,■■ ■„■.'."' The result of this division made it clear that the Government could not survive the fitting. Mr; Massey had carried the outer defences and had only to await his opportunity to storm the citadel*,' ' '.'..:-' 7 The sudden and- dramatic nature of the the first sortie came as a' great shock to the Government. The result was the more surprising in that the Opposition had nob used the votes of either Mr. Millar or Mr. Clark: ■ ■

•When the division was announced there Was no demonstration, Mr. Massey warned his followers with uplifted hand to hold their peace, and the members of the defeated party busied themselves in desperate haste in putting up a member to inaugurate a stonewall. Premier's Manly Speech.. For some time after midnight the proceedings were of a more dignified nature than they had. been for two days,, except for one of Mr. Laureuson'a vitriolic little outbursts. The House was now full and the air was electric. When the Prime Minister rose to speak there was a little stir. It was a quarter to two when Mr. Mackenzie commenced his speech. He was listened to with rapt attention, and lie certainly mado a fine speech. He indicated clearly that the game was up, but in the hour of defeat lie made a manly speech with no taint of bitterness in it. Probably, Mr. Mackenzie, who has made many vigorous and humorous speeches in th-_- New Zealand Parliament, never appeared to better advantage than'he did in the small hours of this morning. When he resumed his seat the applause from the Opposition was even greater than that from the Ministerial benches, showing that in their hour of victory they were still able to give the vanquished his due meed of praise.

Washing Dirty Linen. At a later stage the debate degenerated and certain members of the Liberal p'rfcy began-to wash in public the political linen they had soiled in'the caucus. . Mr. Eoderick McKenzio commenced with what appeared to be a fairly large wash and some other members gave him a hand. -The less said about this phase of -:-5 debate the better/ One point, in regard to it thatvfe daseifyiaisf of mention is the.

admirable self-restraint shown . by ■■ Mr. Myers, under criticism of a needlessly vicious character. ; At times it -bordered upon the. painful, and secrets of the caucus were laid bare to such an extent that the utter demoralisation of the .remnants of what was once the Liberal party; became apparent to all. But for this the actual contest would have come almost to an end with the Prime Minister's' speech. By the time Hi is internal '.-'< party •' wrangle .;. had ended Ministerialists had begun to recover from the first .rude shock to which they had been subjected, and a look of despondency gave place to an expression .■■.resignation. Final Challenge. , The crucial division■•waa> however,, yet to be taken. At twenty minutes to five, just before the first faint glimmer of dawn : was beginning to show beyond the harbour ; hills, Mr. Wilford finished the last speeds ! in the dreary, one-sided, and almost unI necessary debate, and the division bell 1 rang again. Mr. Millar and Mr. Clark had left the House, and had gone home and to bed, but a taxi-cab brought them both to the Home in ample time, , ■■■■-_• Mr. Miliar,' for the first time in his political history, made his appearance on the Opposition side of the House. Mr. Poland ' was not absent on this occasion, but Mr. Roderick McKenzie walked out and did not vote. '■--',■'•-•' While the figures were being .counted, Mr. : Millar moved about among the Opposition benches, shaking hands here and there with an .old friend or-colleague. _Ife was somewhat sad to see the old warrior —who had risen from his bed,, and was still clad in pyjamas tinder Ms tweeds and overcoat-standing on the old familiar battle ground. Though, stricken with ill-' ness and with one.side of his. ; features slightly twisted with paralysis, Ibis 'massi vb figure still towered above, hia fellows. A wave of sympathy must' have; gone on*' "from friend and foe alike to "'this gallant fighter, coupled with many wishes for the speedy recovery that the medical men have promised him. - .•■',':''■ ;; :. ! .: '

The Crucial Test. Once more the bell rang, this time for ; the fateful division. Again the members filed in; the votes were '.counted, and Mr. •'Massey, after his long heroic' fight, was declared the victor. The pent-up feelings of His Majesty's Opposition,, and 1 of, the men and women in the public galleries, now found vent in a round of applause, and after, a period of over 22 years another page in the political, history of New Zealand was turned down. ..'../■.'"".

The Division List. : ,'.; The following was the division list t—Against the For the - ; Government (41): Government (33): I ■'.':■ Allen '■'.■ ". ■ Atmore , Anderson H Brown Bell -.'-. Buddo '"■', Bollard, .T. ' , Buxton Bollard, S. P.. Carroll Bradney Oolvin Buchanan Davey Buick Dickie Campbell Ell Clark Forbes Cpatas . Glover Dickson Hanan Escott Hindmarsh Fisher Isitt Fraser Laurenson Guthrie McCallum Harris Macdonald Herdman Mackenzie, T. Hine Myers ' Hunter Parata Lang Payne Malcolm Poland Mander Rangihiroa Massey Robertson Millar . Russell Jfewman, A. K. Seddoii Newman, E. Sidey Nosworthy Smith, P.. W. Okey Thomson, J. C. Pearce Veitch Pomare Ward Reed Wilford Shades, £. H. . Witty Rhodes, T. W. Scott Smith, F. H. Statham Sykes Thomson, G.M. Wilson Young " Lee (Opposition) and Craigie (Government) were paired. Roderick McKcjuie did not vote. Hemes and Ngata were the only absentees. The Speaker's Announcement. Tiio defeat of Die Mackenzie Government was denounced by the Speaker in the brief foraiuJa : " The Ayes are 41, the Noes are 33. The amendment carried." Another ten minutest were occupied by 'formalities'l •■ usually complied with on the 'defeat of a Government, "'■

; * : '. : -' '•■:■'- - .'- .■'-. ; - ; - '->■ .'■■•■■■■ - , ; ■■■"'■'" ■- . ' ■ .-. -' : ■■",". The House i- having" declared by vote/' said' the Prime Minister, " that ■ the majority have no confidence in -the present Government, I ask the House to : adjourn, -till -next Bitting day,, when I shall be prepared to state what course the Government will be prepared to adopt." ;' ' Address to the Governor. On the motion of the Leader of the Opposition, Messrs.'Allen, Eraser, and G. M. Thomson and the mover ./.were appointed a committee to prepare '■ an Ad-dress-in-Reply,; to the Governor's Speech. A few minutes later the address was presented to the. Speaker, read to the House, and adopted. The House ■ meantime decided, on the motion of the Prime Minister, that on Tuesday it should resolve itself into committee to consider the supply to bo granted to His Majesty and into Committee of Ways and Means of raising supply. The Parties and the Future. -A brief speech was made by Mr. Massey on the Prime Minister's motion- the House should adjourn:.. "I do not propose to make a speech," he said, "but I should just like to say, referring to the debate on my amendment, and especially that part of the < debate wliich took place before the first division, that 1 am glad to be able to acknowledge that while-naturally i there was a certain amount of excitement' 1 and heat, on the whole it was carried on with courtesy and dignity, and in accordance with the desire which I expressed at the commencement, that when it was-all over there would be nothing to regret. So far as the future is concerned, just let me take this opportunity of saying that I hope that whatever may take place in the next two or three Weeks, we shall be ready and willing to drop, as far ; as pos-, sible,_ anything in the way of party strife, ; certainly anything in the way of personal differences, and in the session which hasT commenced work together harmoniously tor the good of the country to which we. belong. In -conclusion, I would like to thank the Prime Minister and tho members of his party for.their .generous reference to myself during the course of the debate which has just concluded." (Applause.) -'. ■" ■■'■; ; The Prime ' Minister tendered most hearty congratulations to the Leader of the Opposition. He remarked that the debate had been conducted in a manner worthy of the highest traditions of ''-Parliament./ He expressed a hope that Mr. Massey. and his colleagues would worthily carry ..the honours shortly to be conferred "upon them., "It will give me pleasure," added Mr. Mackenzie, to assist by ; every legitimate means the work they may l be engaged upon. While we may differ in our political opinions, I,'shall /be glad to assist them in every way possible," '(Ministers': " Hear,, hear," and general applause.) ' ■' ; '

marks on light railways brought from Hon R. McKenzie the interjection: Good ga< but not sound". pokey. Hall-Jones tried it, and he had to pull it up and scrap it after two years. , The ■ Premier next touched statements that; the Government, had pirated the policy of - the ',: Opposition, ami embodied it in the law of the land. v If ; this Iwere so he submitted the Opposition I should be behind the Government, ! Mr.; Massey : If .that is.so the Government should be in gaol.' i The Government, Mr. T. Mackenzie ' claimed, had■: done good work in removing the duty from sugar and from kerosene. Mr R. McKenzie :■" I remember when you opposed removing it, all the same., (Laughter.) 7 ,'■ ■_'.".. :? The Prime Minister: That must have been a mixing top of the Mackenzie*. (Renewed laughter.) Proceeding, the Prime Minister thanked the officers and the Secretaries with whom he had been associated, and expressed re-let at parting with them. To the 'future he looked with faith and hope, and believed that from what ; had occurred something better ; would evolve. , (Opposition hear, hears.) "After all," concluded the Prime Minister, " 1" leave this post, with a feeling of equanimity. There is an old Mackenzie motto: 'Prepared for either v fate/ and any matt' who enters political life should be prepared for that. After all, the prize is m the race we run, hot in the goal," (Loud applause, in which the Opposition joined.) ..-•■'- '

Forceful Men Wanted. Mr. T. M, Wilford (Butt) .said . the speech delivered' by : the Prime Minister was a speech that never would be for-' gotten. .Next to winning, the best thing was to ttdsec well. He had found the party wrecked. 1 and disintegrated when he returned to New ..Zealand; some weeks ago, but ho"■could never see that he ought to vote with the opposing party for an immediate personal advantage. /Unless Mr. Massey brought down a Liberal policy there was no chance foif him. What was wanted in New Zealand was kinetic men,, forceful .'men. Tins was a time for men of action, and the Leader of the Opposition had a magnificent opportunity if he could rise to the occasion, and produce a policy acceptable to the people of New Zealand. If he was prepared to increase the graduated -tax to deal with the aggregation of estates, promote closer settlement, and to preserve the national endowments, even in a different form, ho would win supporters from, the opposite side of the House. If be might be permitted to say it,* there were inen on the Ministerial side of the House who were virile men, and if. /Massey brought down a progressive policy, he would get support, from ■''■quarters- which ho least expected."' s-

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Bibliographic details

THE MINISTRY DEFECTED, New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIX, Issue 15039, 8 July 1912

Word Count
2,514

THE MINISTRY DEFECTED New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIX, Issue 15039, 8 July 1912

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