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PARLIAMENT.

LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL.

MEASURES DEALT .WITH, [fir TELEGRAPH.— ASSOCI-VTiOS.] Wellington, Wednesday. The Legislative Council met at 2.30 p.m. On the motion for the third reading of the Guardian Trust and Executors Company Bill, the Hon T. Kelly (Taraiiiikii protested against the extraordinary manner in which a Bill of such a character had been passed by the other House. The Hon. 0. Samuel (Taronaki), said that the Bill was an attempt to revive an obsolete Act. He appealed to the Council to refuse to let such n measure go through. The Hon. J.. McGowan (Auckland) considered that the Bill should never have been brought on at all. After further discussion the Bill was read a third time by 15 votes to 14. Sir John Findlay moved the discharge of the Judiciary Bill, and this was agreed to. The Christchurch District Drainage Bill was read a second time without discussion. " " Sir John Findlay moved the second reading of the Death Duties Bill, which was carried.

The Council (hen adjourned ' until tie evening. When the Council resumed at eight p.m., the Land Tax and Income Tax, Rating Amendment, Shipping and Seamen Amendment., and the University of Otago Council Bills passed through, all their stages. The Public. Works Amendment and Auckland University College Amendment Bills were read a second time. • - r When the Public Works Amendment Bill was being taken, the Hon. J. E. Jenkins. (Wellington) suggested that the proviso , to, clause 2, giving the Minister certain powers in regard to electric lines, should follow the ensuing sub-sections, so as to curtail the power of the Minister.

Sir John Findlay said he did not think the suggestion was material, but he would consider it when the. Bill was in committee. ' '.. t . ': Progress was reported on the Auckland University Bill..". The Methodist Church Bill was passed through committee. The Council rose,at 11.15 p.m. - HOUSE I 01? REPRESENTATIVES. TRAMWAYS BILL PASSED.

Consideration of the Tramways Amcndm >o Bill .was continued by the House of BtpresenXativ >.i in <ommittee after the tijlHgfapb. office closed this morning:; " 'The Minh'te- [ Jtf*r Public Works, questioned by Mr • Herdman (Wellington stated ihat his own opinion Was frrouraole to j central aislo in. cars. It would be wise to.let the "clause apply to new cars, because they were being built in Auckland, Christchurch, and ~Wdl ugton, and it was thus possible to gajk. -oore for the principle ; embodied in •■ i*s clause than if an attempt was mad© t-e include all;; existing cars. ; He moved to add words .. making , the clause ' apply only to * all cars licensed after the passing of this Act.'' 'I The amendment was carried tho : voices." ; h ""■-" ' " :i ; ',•' •• : ..

* A motion iu&t all cars j licensed in future shall J have a passageway throughout -til© portion set aside for "passengers was " agreed to on the voices. "A motion by Air. Wilford to exclude Wellington trams from the operation of the Act was lost by 29 votes to 16. ■ ~. -;_" On the, motion of the 1 Hon. R. McKenzie a clause was inserted to remove the right to a 'Grovernment certificate .o? com•..atency by the holder of a in6tonssan f « freense granted by » 7 ooal authority. Itvr<is explained _ ;hai this was intended to. prevent: men . wit!; insufficient experience from getting licenses as riiotormen on the recommendation, of a local authority. " \ ', "■."""'.'.:■'• ' . * ' ' The Bill passed its final stages and the House roe* 2.45 a.m.

v. ' "*•■"•_ Questions*, - Answered. ~.When the House reassembled at 2.50 p.m. Mr. J. Duncan (VVairau) asked the Prime Minister if he 'would provide a £ for £ subsidy for the Captain Cook memorial, which it: was proposed to erect in Ship Cove, Queen Charlotte Sound., ' '.'> . Sir Joseph Ward promised to consider thejadvisability of, putting an amount on the . Supplementary Estimates for the purpose mentioned. ~.„*.. ■,.. '.'. v ■. .; ; .'< : The Prime Minister, replying to Mr.; Macdpnald.(Bay of Plenty), said that the question of subsidising rates contributed by natives to local bodies would be. considered. .'**. t - " \

Mr. : Myers (Auckland East) asked the Prime Minister when Local Bilk were to considered...^.!'-

Sir Joseph Ward replied thai he would make a statement during the evening. If it were found impossible to \vl~d up the stssida "-. by-Saturday Local: Bilk would be taken, next week. If he had to,-ask the House to adoot. this ; course and go into next week he would not ask . that «.Le House sit,in-,. the mornings. - If, however, he came to the . conclusion that business could* be concluded by Saturday he would be .compelled to ask the House to sit on Thursday, Friday, and, Saturday mornings,', Mr. Jennings r (Tuumuru'nui) asked the Prime Minister what -was intended to be done with, His Gaming Amendment Bill. In t. his opinion the House would get no reply' from the Racing Commission during the session.:;: - ■-.'■- ■ - '■■~,;",. ■■'"■•■

'-- Sir -Joseph- Ward replied that he - had already-promised that if the Commission' did not report this session he would provide an opportunity for the uaming -Bill to be discussed further. ;; -<■ ,; In reply to questions Ministers stated :— That the .Government would be glad to have an expression of opinion from mem-; bers of Parliament, in connection with, the new Parliamenit JBnildings, but the final responsibility of selection, devolved upon, the Government. '.'■".'

Under the present conditions the Government had ho power to interfere with the discretion of the directors of the Bank of New Zealand in- the investment of its funds or to direct - whether-such funds shall be kept in the Dominion or invested elsewhere- . The directors are expected to do their utmost in the interests of shareholders, amongst the largest of whom is the New Zealand Government.

.The Government's attention had been drawn to one case of evasion of the law under the Commercial Trusts Act, and the case.was being inquired into. . ." The question of the substitution of commercial geography for French in the syllabus under the Civil Service examination, regulations had been carefully considered, and no reason had been seen for the change. . French is the official language, of the Universal Postal Union, and it was desirable that all officers dealing with foreign mails should have a knowledge of: the language. The statement that the Government had " squandered money in hiring a whole ship to come from England in" was an impertinent fabrication and, absolutely untrue. It. was proposed to go into the whole question of the constitution of the Court of Arbitration during the next recess. The decision of the Government in the matter would be announced in due course. The Government was ready to assist local bodies in giving every facility to consider the question- of electrical or any other method of traction. The question of subsidising the , construction of tram--I'nes to be electrically operated was worthy! of consideration, but until the Government develops some large force of hydro-electri-cal power for transmission to suitable localities it was doubtful whether it would be profitable for local bodies to undertake the construction of small schemes with a view to electric traction on light tramways. The matter was, however, receiving careful consideration • by the Public ■Wo.'ks Department. ■~,-,, Any,"well-founded " complaint regarding, men employed on: co-operative railway. w_orks\wJiich cornea under, .the Minister's.)

notice will receive full consideration, for it is the desire of the Government that the men employed on co-operative works shall always earn-at least ...the ordinary wages payable in the district, r In the evening the Hon. D. Buddo moved the second reading of the Local Elections and Polls Amendment Bill, which provides that everv elector who, on the close of a poll, is present in the polling place for the purpose of voting shall be entitled to receive a voting-paper and exercise the vote. After some discussion the motion was agreed to.

Workers', Compensation. On the motion to commit the Workers' Compensation Amendment Bill the Hon. J. A. Millar explained the new clauses. - Sir Joseph Ward said that clauses would be introduced into the Bill in committee bringing domestic servants under the term : - workers." so that they would get the full benefits of the Act- • Messrs. Isitt. Luke, and Brown congratulated the Minister on the introduction of the measure. . Mr. Poland (Ohinemuri) urged the Minister to make provision for the relatives of workers killed in New Zealand but living away from the Dominion to claim compensation in all Australian States. He objected to the length of time an injured worker had to be off before he could make a claim. He urged that the State should take over the whole of the accident insurance in New Zealand.

Hon. J. A. Millar, in reply, said in regard to accident pay that if Mr. Poland's suggestions were given effect to the result would be that premiums would go up 250 per cent, and the small employers would cease to insure because they could not afford to pay the premiums. - Th' 3 motion to go into committee was caniyd.

Th» * oan Bill. Sir Joseph Ward moved the second reading of the Loan Bill ■ Mr. Allen said he was not opposed to reasonable loan s ), but what he did oppose was the wasteful expenditure of borrowed money. The present cost of the construction of railways was an instance. Railways should be. taken into the back blocks, and the country opened up. At the present time every mile of railway cost £2000 more than it did 10 or 12 years ago. He entirely agreed with the policy of the present Minister for Railways, who held that railways should earn four per cent, and not 3£ per cent., as did his predecessor. They should pay interest on the cost of construction. There was further extravagance in regard to public buildings. He thought it better to put up with inconvenience for a little while, and put money into the opening up of the country. He further objected to lack of information respecting the cost of raising loans. The Government had no right to withhold such information. He asked what the Prime Minister was going to do when the limits of borrowing had been reached. Borrowing should be reduced so gradually ■ that a cassation of borrowing would not produce a financial difficulty. -He regretted that the Government had not fullillod ite promise to expend a-quarter of a million annually on back-blocks roads. Mr. Massey complained of the failure of the Government to supply information concerning the cost of raising loans.' No one knew the cost of the £5,000,000 raised las- year. He strongly objected to the way money voted for roads and bridges was dealt with. When money was voted it should be-expended. He did not suggest thrvV &e Sinister for the Department was res but the Department should see that -, ..i tiinounts voted were spent. He regrutteu that the Local Government Bill had not been brought down this session. In connection with the development of water power the Government was pursuing a dog-in the-manger policy. He thougnt that if private concerns wished to pursue the matter they should be allowed to do so. -. Local bodies, too, should be allowed a similar privilege. With regard to land for settlement the .tables of arrivals and departures in the Dominion . showed the necessity for utilising unoccupied land. The Land Department was not doing enough for settlement purposes. The land in the Kawhia district would supply the needs of, New Zealand for the next two years. The land was good, the harbour was good, and the. climate was good, and yet tha whole district was at a standstill.

Mr. Laurenson (Lytteltcn) said that Mr. Massey delivered the eame old speeches year after year. He was a political bully, and Mr. Allen was a political nagger. Mr. Massey had no sense of proportion. Mr. Herries entered a complaint about pie failure of the Government to supply format in regaid to the cost of Joans. His working out of the cost of the £5,000,000 loan did not coincide with the Government's. . He failed to understand why the Government would give no indication of the cost of these loans. He was in favour of a borrowing policy. The Government country should be opened up by borrowed money, but the way in which this was done at the present time did not appeal to him. The present system of railway construction was distinctly wasteful. He complained of the failure of the Minister to spend monies voted for mining districts. A great deal of the success of the Dominion was due to the development of the gold mining industry. It was responsible for bringing a lot of settlers to the Dominion, and some of them were excellent settlers, yet the industry was being starved. -

Eon. R. McKenzie said the increased cost of railways was due to the use of better and heavier material. Ho regretted that a cold prevented him from dressing down Messrs. Hemes and Allen. * The charge that there had been extravagance in public buildings had not been supported. There had been no borrowing in this country save for public works urgently required. The development :f the hydro-electrical, energy scheme would necessitate the borrowing of some five or six millions. It was always necessary to have more money on the Public Works Estimates than it was proposed to spend. " More money Would be spent this year than last year. This ex-' penditure had nothing to do with the fact that this was election year. ; ;V : (Left Sitting.)

POLITICAL NOTES.

, . THE " EDUCATION ACT. [BY TELEGRAPH.— CORRESPONDENT. Wellington, Wednesday. In the House this afternoon Mr. E. H. Clark (Chalmers) asked the Prime Minister if the amendment to the Education Act promised by: the Minister when the Estimates "were . going., through, giving teachers the right to appeal in case of transfer, would bo made this session. He hoped the matter would not be dropped, because there was a real necessity for the amendment. Sir Joseph Ward said he would be glad to consider the matter, bu ; ; it was - not quite such an easy proposition as appeared on the face of it. In any case, it would net be possible to put legislation through this session.

PUBLIC WORKS ESTIMATES. The leaders of the two parties in the Houso oi Representatives agreed this evening that the House should go into Committee of Supply without debate to-morrow afternoon to consider the Public Works; Estimates. ' THE MOKAU INQUIRY. ; The report "by the Native Affairs Committee on its inquiry regarding the Mokau land transactions was not presented in the. House of Representatives this afternoon. It was understood that the report was ready, and it was evidently crowded out by debates on other matters. Mention of the report was made in the House this evening by the Leader of the Opposition (Mr. Maisey), who asked whether opportunity would be given to discuss the committee's finding. ~.' , .... :.. •, f

The Prime Minister: It is absolutely necessary that we should have an opportunity. 1 want to know what the committee has been doing. He added that the' committee had been sitting all the session, and he wanted to know why the inquiry had been prolonged in > such an extraordinary manner. As it was agreed that the Public Works Estimates will be taken to-morrow the report will bo further deJayed until Friday? " ' • ""' ' " ■• '

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

PARLIAMENT., New Zealand Herald, Volume XLVIII, Issue 14815, 19 October 1911

Word Count
2,508

PARLIAMENT. New Zealand Herald, Volume XLVIII, Issue 14815, 19 October 1911

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