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INDUSTRIAL STRIFE.

MOUNT LYELL TROUBLE.

THE WOMEN'S CRY FOR PEACE. By. Telegraph.— Association.—Copyright. Hobart, October, 18. A meetixg of the women of Queenstown decided to ask the Mount Lyell miners (now on strike primarily because of the dismissal of an employee named White) to take a secret ballot to decide whether the qutstion of the reinstatement of White ebould be dropped. The meeting also decided that White- be requested to leave the district, and that ihe president and the secretary of the laion be asked to resign, RESIDENTS LEAVE*

LEADERS CRITICISED (Received October 19, 1.55 a.m.)

Hobabt, October 18.

Many residents are leaving the Mount Lyell district. Much adverse criticism has been occasioned by the Labour leaders' attitude in regard to the strike.

FEDERAL ARBITRATION. GOVERNMENT'S BILL. . AN OPPOSITION AMENDMENT. By Telegraph.Press Association.— Copyright. (Received October 18. 10.30 p.m.) Melbourne, October 18. -In the Federal House of Representatives Mr. Deakin, Leader of the- Opposition, resumed the debate on the Government's Industrial Arbitration Amendment Bill. • Mr. Deakin opposed the powers proposed to be given to the Arbitration Court, . which, •he said, were based on the idea that all industrial conditions were sxed and could be regulated by time-table. It meant separating the craft from the industry, and it would revolutionise or wreck the original Act to make such basic alterations. He moved the following ; amendment:—

"That no measure the effect of -which will be to concentrate in the hands of any one person control of all the industries of the Continent can be other than impracticable and fraught with danger to the whole community.''

CAMBRIAN MINERS IDLE.

CRUELTY TO A HORSE.

Loxdojt, October 17.

Some 6500 coal miners and others are {die as a result of the Cambrian haulers' Itrike. The trouble arose through the management displacing a man for cruelty to i horse.

'WORK TO BE RESUMED.

■A'.. BETTER FRAME OF MIND.

: , (Received October 18. -9M p.m.) . . .London, October 18. The Cambrian colliers have resolved that

v an investigation into the dismissed 1 man's grievances by a workmen's cojiimittee 'ought to precede a strike. ■ , A deputation of the men, therefore, in- : ■'terviewed the management, arid wifcbidrew 1 the demand fcr the dismissed man's reinstatement. v Work is being resumed "to•day. ■- V""-:.- """"-■■" ; _I_2_*'". '.'v'^-

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INDUSTRIAL STRIFE. New Zealand Herald, Volume XLVIII, Issue 14815, 19 October 1911

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