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THE VICTORIA LEAGUE.

AUCKLAND BRANCH FORMED

ELECTION OF OFFICERS.

A meeting of the. newly-ormed Auckland branch of th;i Victoria League was held in the Chamber of Commerce last evening. Professor Segar occupied the chair, and there was a fair attendance, principally of ladies.

The aims of the league were recounted to the meeting. It is a non-party organisation, r.amed in memory of Her late Majesty Queen Victoria. The members hold themselves ready, as far as possible,

to support and assist any scheme leading to more intimate understanding between ourselves and our fellow-subjects in our great colonies and dependencies. They

also aim at promoting any practical work desired by the colonies tending to the

good of the Empire. The league endeavours to become a centre for receiving and distributing information regarding the British dominions, and invites the al-

liance of, and offers help and co-opera-

tion to, such bodies of a similar nature as already exist or may hereafter be

formed throughout the Empire. An important work undertaken by the league is the care of the graves of the soldiers who fell in the South African war.

In speaking on the objects of the

league Mr. W. J. Napier said that a few years ago it waa recognised by a number of observant English people that there was a danger that the colonies might grow up into a nationhood almost as strangers to the Motherland. There were no political ties, few social ties, and no

recognition or identity of interests. False ideas of colonists were arising, and a colonial visiting London felt he was a stranger. The policy of separation was now, however, a thing of the past, and in bringing about this better understanding the league had done its part. In it the ladies had a great mission, and one that was realised by Victoria, the first Empire Queen, who saw further than many of her statesmen and kept the Empire together, in spite of disintegrating influences. In establishing the league the meeting would, be participating in the great work of Empire-building, the fusing into tine organic whole of the scattered peoples owning allegiance to the British flag. The result would be to stimulate the growth of a broader citizenship. There were already about 100 members in Auckland, and he looked forward to a membership of 400 or 500. The Chairman touched on the common language, traditions, aspirations, and interests tending to the unity of the Empire, and said that in the future there might be disintegrating influences. One in particular he foresaw a possibility of, and that was that the Old Country might grow somewhat tired of the increasing burden of defence, and there might be a revival of the old idea that colonies were an encumbrance. Such a possibility suggested that the league might be useful in the future, well as now. Mr. F. Rollett empha&Lid the importance of the branch of work concerned with the welcoming of strangers, and suggested cooperation with the British Immigration League of Australia. The following officers were elected, though the:number may bo added to: — j Vice-presidents, His Worship tho Mayor, Colonel Abbott. Professor Egerton, the ! Hon. G. Fowlds, the Rev. Goldstein, j Colonel Holgate, Sir R. Lockhart, Bishop Lenihan, Canon Mac Murray, Dr. McDowell, ! Bishop Neligan, Dr. Parkes, Colonel Reid, the Rev. .P. Smallfield, Professor Segar, Dr. W. E. Thomas, Dr. Hope Lewis, the Rev. Grey Dixon, Messrs. H. Brett, Bankhart, H. Horton, W. S. Douglas, B. Kent, Leys, Major, Napier, Tibbs, Wight, Thomson; treasurer, Mr. Brooke-Smith, secretary, Mrs. Rollett. The election of a president was deferred. It was resolved that the general council should consist of 30, and the following were elected, with power to add to their number:—Mesdames Napier, Colgrove, Neligan. W. Bloomfield, Leo. Myers. A. Myers, Luckie, Hope Lewis, Devore, Miss Mowbray, Messrs. Napier, John Reid, W. R. Walker, Rollett, and the Hon. E. Mitchelson.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19091203.2.78

Bibliographic details

THE VICTORIA LEAGUE., New Zealand Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 14234, 3 December 1909

Word Count
646

THE VICTORIA LEAGUE. New Zealand Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 14234, 3 December 1909

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