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PARLIAMENT.

[by TKLioTi.'.i'ii. —mow?* association.] • LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL. WEDNESDAY. TiiK Council met at 2.50 p.m. ADVANCES TO SETTLERS ACT. The Hon, W. W. M. CAROLK moved, "That the attention of the Government no 'directed to the f.ol that no provision has been mad" mid • ih-'i Advances to Settlers Act enabling Holders under private contract f: ./in ~'i'.:- > owners and other landlords to obtain "d: uiees on improvements on such holdings. Mid that in order that justice, wwy be extended to a large and increasing numb of delving settlers at amendment to the Af/v.-i-cs to feet-ties* Act is urgently require; " _ The ATTORNEY-GENERAL explainer that in many caws under private contracts there were 'difficulties in connection with titles. He would bring the matter under the notice of the Minister for Finance.

LOAN BILL PASSED. On the motion of the ATTORNEYGENERAL the standing orders were suspended to enable tho Aid to i'ublic Works and Settlement Bill (Loan Bill, to be passed through all its stages at the present sitting. „ ■ The Bill was passed without discussion. MEIKLE ACQUITTAL BILL. The ATTORNEY-GENERAL moved the second reading of the Meiklo Acquittal Bill. Tho Bill was read a second timo and ordered to tie committed next. day. SECOND READINGS. The Incorporated Societies Bill and the New Zealand Society of Accountants Bill were read a second time. The Council adjourned at 3.15 p.m. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES Wednesday. The Rouse met at 2.30 run. WELLINGTON HARBOUR BILL. Tim Wellington Harbour Board Reclamation and Empowering Bill was read a second time, and was divided into two Bills, one local and the other private.

THE LATE SIR JOHN HALL. The SPEAKER reported to the House that he had received a letter from Mr. Wilfred Hall, stating that it had been the desire of his father, tha late. Sir John Hall, that a photograph of himself should be presented to the House of Parliament, and asking whether the House would accept it. The Prime Minister moved, and Mr. Hardy seconded, aid it was resolved, "Thai this House has much pleasure in accepting the photograph of one who for so long a time occupied a pi eminent position in the public life of the Dominion."

THE JEWISH OATH. , The Hon. J. McGOWAN read a reply from the official assignee in Wellington to a question relative to his having compelled a Jew to take the oath with his hat off, contrary to the usual Hebrew custom. The reply stated that no indication was given that the person sworn was a Hebrew, Messrr.. Laurehson, Poole, and Batime expressed dissatisfaction with the reply. Messrs. Hardy and T. Mackenzie defended the official assignee.

FIRST READINGS. The following Bills were introduced and read a first time:—Lincoln Road Board Empowering Bill (Mr. Lewis, for Mr. Rhodes) and the Christchurch City Betterment Bill (Mr. Gray).

REPLIES TO QUESTIONS. In reply to questions, Ministers * stated as follows: — ', . > \ ;■,.•; That the reason the English mail missed the Southern boat at Onehunga on the sth hist, was that the agent of the Ngapuhi declined to delay the steamer, owing to the i fact that the weather'was 'too bad •, to permit of the steamer being kept with safety. ; "•■•■' \i'.:.' - .'.'■■ That the services of a first-class irrigation engineer will shortly be obtained, and the whole matter of the irrigation of Central Otago will be gone into. ' 1 That the Government was not aware that the rumours that it was intended to increase the Government fee insurance rates were well founded. ' The Government, however, had been advised that the present rates were ' probably too low to meet the risks run, but the'matter had not yet been considered.

That the Government intended to amend the Municipal Corporations Act, 1900, to enable .borough councils owning and working gasworks to sell coal to {heir burgesses and others, but whether it would be done this session depended upon the progress of the public business. That the Government was unaware that the Chief Justice proposes to visit America and Great Britain next year. Even so, advantage could not be taken of such a visit for him to represent the Dominion at the Canadian cdibt.rations, as these celebrations take place ttxie; month. , - That so far as the Government Lending Departments are concerned, they have not refused to grant loans upon lands that owners -fa: "e granted petrel rights over. That the scale of duties payable under I the Deceased Persons' Estate Duties Act

is fixed by statute, and there is no present intention on the part of the Government to introduce legislation to alter the existing law. .' ■':..'•'■■'•'." - '""'■ "' '""

That the Government does not propose to make provision in the Old Age Pensions Act for the payment of pensions to persons who arc incapacitated from work by accident or permanent illness without requiring them to wait until they attain the age of 65.. The Act in force in the Dominion is the most liberal of - the various measures in operation in Australasia. That during the recess the Government w ill consider the question of introducing, on the lines of the Commonwealth Commerce Trade Descriptions Act, 1905, a measure with the following objects: --(1) To protect those tradesmen who correctly describe their goods from competitors, who, by false or misleading descriptions deceive the public to the disadvantage of honest manufacturers who may have established a reputation for a good article; (?) that tfes purchasing public shall know the actual country of origin of imported! goods; (3) that the reputation of the natural industries in New Zealand may be maintained, and probably increased, by ensuring that New Zealand productions of'inferior kinds shall not be permitted to masquer-, ade under a description which is applicable only to the bes6 quality. That the Government could not agree to free carriage on railways for agricultural salt. That everything possible is being done in constructing rolling-stock to meet the demands anticipated upon the completion of the North Island Main Trunk railway. That the Government could not grant re- . turn tickets at single rates jo fanners and , others travelling to market on market days. In past years a special concession, | similar to.that suggested was introduced, and was so grossly abused that it had to be discontinued. That with a view to the reduction of the risks incurred by railway officials in changing tablets, automatic tablet exchanges were being installed. That the question, of placing railway dining_ car employees on fie railway classifi- \ ---'•tion list T>i'l receive attention. j _ TI-;3., ■£-..' •rin.fr.'j. could not author- | is* tLt ~; ;';> E \ [side workshops, as the eomplrtios of ;.!.'. MaL? ' Trunk line would remove tie. congestion. That there was no probability of. the patent laws being revised this session. That an officer of the Agriculteai Department would vk.it the Cook Islands, and report on the fruit there. That sufficient cause had not been shown for the introduction of a Poor Prisoners Defence Bill, judges already having power t-o assign counsel for the defence of a ' i <■■ i km* "wifctjaot we?.ns, J ■' That a. Bill to :>rak« -it •:vt'Xtra\\;<jry for ■ mmeowiieif to ypvM- iwovjer :-ecoj>imoda--I,tion for the enipi- * -■ v;,-rM i/.-volve drasI tie; alteration, of f.-.. U< ., -, &nd could not I do brought ff;»vn *r> ■ virion. I That the Q *' , ' e: " wi were not'aware 1 ',; , A " a ';« ; » s "'" m arriving in sacks ,l»«8ag. to*. && cf New Zea* fit . ■ 1

land'flour-millers, but the Customs officers had been instructed to look out ior such cases. That a Bill was now uncfer consideration for the purpose of dealing with shoddy goods, and Woui4 deal with .branding. ''„','.. That the Government could not; introduce legislation to provide for the payment to' iu.cai bodies' half the royalties collected from the sale ..of timber from, State forests, as the revenue therefrom was the only souvce from which the operations of the''Afforestation Department were maintained.

That the matter of amending the Noxious Weeds Act was under emisideretion.. Thai inquiries were being made regarding the. advisableness of importing owls anil other birds of prey to put down tho small bird pest. Thai it was considered almost impossible to organise the 4000 contingenters who served in South Africa into separate battalion.-, as they were scattered all over the Dominion.

That a general issue of topographical war maps to volunteers was not a?sidered advisable.

That the whole subject of experimental farms was receiving attention. That a Poisons Bill, dealing amongst other things with the sale of ehlorodyne, would sherdv be introduced.

The Hon. W. HALL-JONES, replying to criticisms, said most of the questions nddreseed to him referred to railways, and these all involved increased cost of working or reduction in revenue.

The Hon. G. FOWLDS also answered a. number of criticism*, and the House adjourned at 5.30 p.m. The House resumed at 7.30 p.m..

FINANCIAL DEBATE. The financial debate was continued by Mr. GRAY, who twitted the Leader of tlm Opposition with not being serious in his allegations that the Government, was extravagant, because lie did not- opjiuw? further borrowing. He quoted siaustics to show the progress of the Dominion in the past 30 years. Mr. MALCOLM regretted the tendency of the Government to take the whole, credit for the prosperity of the Dominion to itself. Surely some of the credit was due to Thomas Bright, the originator of the freezing industry. He was very glad, as a patriotic Briton, that it was propped to increase the naval subsidy from £40,000 to £100.000 and he felt that the 0 -non was getting nothing like value for the money spent on the volunteers. He welcomed the special land settlement proposals: of the Budget, i'tough he. would have liked to see the Government sell tend straight out, for cash. The Government was inclined to be extravagant at times, and he instanced in this connection the expenditure of £4000 for the presentation of an organ to Christchurch and £1500 for the Dominion L'i y celebrations. Mr. WITTY replied to some of the criticisms of the previous speaker, and in referring to the special land settlement proposals of the Government expressed the opinion that great caution was required. This was a new departure, proposing that settlers should borrow all the money required to obtain land. He thought they ought in pay down 10 per cent, in cash. If large estate's wore bought by the Government they should be bought before the railway was put through them. Continuing after the supper adjournment, ; Mr. WITTY, referring to the labour troubles, said the paid professional agitator | was not required, and ought to bo turned out. . / Mr. MANOER said he was not going'-to complain of Ministers gallivanting round the country. He was glad they visited the different constituencies. He applauded the loading proposals of the Government, and appealed for roads and railways in North Auckland, which would result in a teeming population. Tie Government was not so great a friend of the farmer as it tried to make. out. He referred to the precarious nature of the farming industry, and the bad policy of forcing up valuations. The land legislation of last session had been forced through, contrary to the expressed wishes of the people, and wac not in accordance with the beat traditions of true democracy. The freehold must be given to the people in the North if the land was to be- satisfactorily settled. ; Mr. IZARD congratulated the last speaker on his remarkable moderation. It was absolutely necessary for' Ministers to visit all parts of the Dominion during the recess. What had been the result, of the Prime Minister's visit to the roadless north? Simply this, that the Budget contained a proposal to spend a large sum annually on raiding. The Leader of the Opposition had said money was < tight because the Government had borrowed heavily in the Dominion last year. The Government borrowed £28.000." The tightness was due to the. heavy borrowing of local bodies, which should borrow outside the Dominion. As to the complaint with regard to land valuations, he was sure every farmer, if asked to sell, would ask more than the Government valuation.

On the motion of Mr. REID. the debate was adjourned, and the House rose at 11.40 p.m.

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Bibliographic details

PARLIAMENT., New Zealand Herald, Volume XLV, Issue 13803, 16 July 1908

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2,004

PARLIAMENT. New Zealand Herald, Volume XLV, Issue 13803, 16 July 1908

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