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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

Among the special articles in to-day's Supplement to the Herald is the first of a series by Dr. W. H. Fitchett, entitled "People and Things in India.'" It describes an interview with Lord Kitchener, the Commander-in-chief in India, and while giving his opinions on many interesting questions, conveys a very graphic character sketch of the great soldier. Mr. Malcolm Ross also contributes the first of a number of articles descriptive of a holiday in the Southern Alps.

His Excellency the Governor arid Lady Plunket held a garden party at Government House yesterday afternoon. To-day Lord Plunket will be present at the military tournameßt at Ellerslie. On Monday His Excellency will probably he present at the Anniversary Regatta.

A dense fog was experienced on the west coast yesterday morning. It completely enveloped the Munukau, and spread inland as far as One-tree Hill, and over the districts near Onehunga. Owing to the heaviness of the fog the s.s. Takapuna, from New Plymouth and Southern ports, was considerably delayed, and did not cross the bar until after noon. She berthed at the Onehunga Wharf at two o'clock. In consequence of this delay the Takapuna was not able to discharge and reload in time, so will not leave for New Plymouth until eight o'clock this morning.

At a meeting of the Remuera Road Board last evening Mr. T. Cotter, the Board's solicitor, submitted the order-in-council and deeds of delegation in connection with the Remuera tramway extension down to Green Lane. A motion was moved by the chairman that the Board's seal be affixed to th<-. deeds. This would enable the compony to commence the extension as soon as the order had been signed by the Governor. The work is to be completed by May 1 next.

His Worship the Mayor (Mr. A. M. Myers), Messrs. F. Lawry, M.H.R., R. Wynyard, S. Bradley, and others sent a telegram to the Hon. Jas. Carroll on the occasion of the unveiling of the statue to the memory of his late brother, Mr. Thos. Carroll. Yesterday the following telegram in reply was received from the Hon. Mr. Carroll: — Your kind wire relative to my late brother was safely received, arid has been communicated to all friends, by whom and myself and family it was much appreciated."

The general secretary of the Auckland Fruitgrowers' Union received advice yesterday that it has been decided by the horticultural division of the Agricultural Department to confine the Government's guarantee of one penny per pound on fruit consigned to London to apples only, not apples amd pears, as was previously stated.

The officers and men of the Auckland Engineers' Company have gone into camp at Fort Takapuna, and 70 men were under canvas when the roll was called. Captain Tapper is in command, and he has with him Lieutenants Hewsoa and Robinson. Lieutenant Robinson, R.E., the engineer staff-officer of the colony, will go into camp with the company upon his arrival from the South, and give instructions in various branches of work. He will also examine the company as to its efficiency for service, and, as an extensive programme has been drawn up, the company should spend an interesting time.

A Press Association telegram from Dunedin states that Miss Brown, daughter of Professor Brown, of Auckland, who was run over by an express in Princes-street, on Thursday, has taken a turn for the better. She is still suffering from severe shock, but no serious consequences are anticipated.

The following tenders for the erection of brick ahops in Symonds-street, for Messrs. E. Porter and Co., have been received by Messrs. E. Mahoney and Son, architects—J. T. Julian, £1427; Wylie and Bagnall, £1370; J. W. Leigh, £1347; Lye and Son, £1285; Burfoot and Son, £1270; A. J. Laurie, £1239; R. Kay, £1222; J. Ellingham, £1204; Moor and Son, £1189; Johns and Son, £1185; Fortzer and Trevarthen, £1180; Craig Bros., £1176; G. M. Handcocl?, £1164; J. W. Jones and Son, £1150 ; J. J. Holland, 1137; Heron Bros.', £1131; J. Davis, £1126; J. H. Colebourne, £1110; and R. H. McCallum, £1097 (accepted).

The Government biologist, Mr. Kirk, states that potato growers suffered most serious losses during the past season. The area under potatoes in 1903-4 was 31,778 acres ; in 1904-5 it was 26,331 acres, showing a decrease of 5447 acres. Disease has reduced the jield by fully two tons per acre, which equals 52,662 tons, which at only £3 per ton means a direct loss of £157,986.

A cab driver named Robert Ware has been admitted to the hospital suffering from a number of bruises and abrasions, received through a fall from his cab, owing to his horse, which had been startled by the whistle of a railway engine, swerving against a post near the water frontage, below Custom-street.'

The stationmaster at Lllerslie, Mr. Charles White, met with a painful accident yesterday afternoon at the railway station. He was boarding the van of a moving train for Auckland, when he slipped, and the wheeds passed over his toes crushing them severely. Mr. White was at once conveyed to the Auckland Hospital.

The post office authorities notify that on Monday next, Anniversary Day, the office will be opened to public business as usual, but there will be only one delivery by letter-carriers, commencing at eight a.m.

Tenders for the erection of the Leys Institute gymnasium have been received by Mr. R. M. Watt, architect, as follows: — James Ley and Sons, £1308: John Davis. £1313; James A. Moodv, £1315: Fortzer and Trevai then, £1529: J. H. Colebourne, £1355: W. E. Hutchison, £1351: Craig Bros., £1360: Heron Bjos., £1414: Robert Kay, £1423; J. Ellingha,m, £1426: Neil McLean. £1434; and J. W. Jones and Son. £1555.

A little girl, daughter of Mr. T. Cooper, of Warahoe, has been admitted to the hospital, where she had a ringer amputated, as the result of getting her hand caught in a chaffcutter on Thursday morning.

Lecturing at Mangatainoka on '* Diseases in Cattle' the chief Government veterinarian said that, instead of there being too many stock inspectors tiie number, in his opinion, was insufficient. They wanted men thoroughly qualified for the work, from practical experience, to pass the necessary examinations proving their theoretical knowledge to be adequate. He advocated an amalgamation of groups of dairy factories obtaining milk supply from 6000 to 8000 cows to secure the sole services of an inspector. It would pay the farmers to bear half the cost, at 6d per cow, the Government contributing the other half. There was, he feared, too great a disposition to put the whole onus on to the Government, instead of the farmers being more self-reliant.

The lad, Laurence Ker, who was injured by falling over a cliff at Waiheke, a few days ago, is making rapid progress towards recovery.

A slab of rough greenstone, weighing 211b, was last week deposited in a Greytown jeweller's shop by a number of natives, of whom three were women, two partowners. According to their story the stone has a history. It came from the South Island over thirty years ago, and was buried on the site of Tamahau's house, at Tablelands, till last Tuesday week, when it was unearthed. . The two wahines now require a fair division of the heirloom, and orders have been given to cut the stone into equal portions. The owners are Mis. Rahu and Mrs. Richard Pahuru.

Captain W. Sinker, of the Mission yacht Southern Cross, leaves for Wellington by the Takapuna this morning.

So far no fewer than 22 Canterbury farmers have entered into possession of properties on the Waimea Estate (says the Mataura Ensign), and several more are due to arrive shortly. Seven or eight other new settlers came from various parts of Southland and Otago, and a number of farmers in the Waimea Plains district have taken up | holdings. Should the • present season prove anything of a success a large influx from the North is expected next year.

The Government has authorised the expenditure of the unexpended balances in the building and maintenance votes to the various education boards amounting to £40,000 the allocation being on the basis laid down in the report of the Education Committee.

A correspondent writing from Kalgoorlie says: —" Gardening here is an expensive hobby, even if one runs but a little flower patch. A flower show is held twice a year, and there is a prize for the best garden. Mr. Hocking, proprietor of the Miner, or a merchant named Brennan takes the prize every time. It costs each of them quite £200 a year for garden water.

A child named Michael Wm. Fields, three and a-half years of age, was recently admitted to the York (W.A.) Hospital, suffering from alcoholic poisoning. The child died within a few hours of admission. At an inquest subsequently held it was stated that the child had obtained possession of a bottle of whisky which was standing on a table, and drank a portion of it. The jury returned a verdict to the effect that death was due to alcoholic poisoning, no blame being attached to anyone.

A Maori named Hooper, a married man with four young children, has applied to the South Canterbury Charitable Aid Board for assistance, under distressing circumstances. Some years ago he lost the sight of one eye. and a short time ago, while chopping wood, a splinter struck him in the other eye, and the doctors hold out no hope of being able to save the sight of it. Hooper states that his life interest in the lands of the Tapu is worth only £3 a year. The Board instructed the secretary to make further inquiries.

During the past few months upwards of 160 men have been sent from the Oamaru district to co-operative works in various parts of the colony, mainly to the North Island (says the Mail). Of those in the North several have taken advantage of opportunities to acquire small blocks of cheap bush land in the vicinity of their work, and these holding:! they spend all their spare time in improving, doing the work assigned to them during the day and working for themselves in the evenings. Thus through sheer perseverance and toil men who but twelve months ago were out of work are now building up homes for themselves and their families.

In. the police cells last night there were four persons charged with drunkenness, one on a charge of using threatening behaviour, and another arrested on a charge of theft.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19060127.2.15

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIII, Issue 13086, 27 January 1906

Word Count
1,745

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XLIII, Issue 13086, 27 January 1906

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