Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

THE MAIN TRUNK LINE.

TO THE F.DITOr..

Sir,— correspondent, Mr. Peter OHpliant, in yesterday's issue, makes some comments upon the Main Trunk line south of Te Kuiti and the land which it traverses. His remarks could not be more grossly misleading to your readers or show more bias and defeated party feeling. Everyone admits that the construction has been painfully slow, partly due to the divided opinion as to routes, but it is unnecessary for Mr. Oliphant to make it appear worse. One would infor that the line was not finished further than the tunnel, and if he has been there within the last few weeks, as he says, then ho must know that the ordinary trains now run over the nest section to Ongarne, 16 miles, and the "road" only needs to be formally taken over, as it has been completed for sometime. The rails are laid to the Wanganui River, where the large iron bridge referred to is being built, the laying of the rails on this last section (about 16 miles) having; been hurried along to enable the material for this bridge to be delivered upon the site. _ Mr. Olipliant's information about the mill at Mangapeohi is sadly in the wrong, as the mill is only just in full swing, it having taken some two years to open up the bush and • construct some 11 miles of tramway, and the owners (Messrs. Ellis and Burnand) deserve praise for the way they have overcome the numerous obstacles that they had to contend with. Re the quality of the land, Mr.' Oliphant has evidently, like so many others, just rushed through by train or otherwise, and straight away considers himself entitled to express his opinions as facts for all to accept. Allow me to inform your readers that the valley itself is undoubtedly 'the most barren land ever seen, but at a distance of from half-a-mile to a mile on either side of the railway the land is from passable to good, and some very good in quality. The reason no settlement is seen beyond Te Kuiti is that the whole of the land belongs to natives, but with a little more patience, if the Maori Land Council is as successful as is anticipated, there is every chance of this so-called poor land being covered with settlement. As an indication of the rapid settlement of the King Country within the last year or so, I may mention that the trains ran twice a week, then three times, and now there are four trains both ways a week, and these are still unable to cop© with the traffic both in passengers and goods.—l am, etc., Atjthouised Suevkyob.

Otorohanga, April 30, 1903.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19030506.2.12.5

Bibliographic details

THE MAIN TRUNK LINE., New Zealand Herald, Volume XL, Issue 12263, 6 May 1903

Word Count
451

THE MAIN TRUNK LINE. New Zealand Herald, Volume XL, Issue 12263, 6 May 1903

Working