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TWENTY THOUSAND POUND NECKLACE.

BRISK BIDDING FOR PEARLS AT CHRISTIE'S. Twenty thousand pounds was the price paid for the wonderful six row pearl necklace at Messrs. Christie's auction-room lately, and experts in the room said it went cheap. Messrs. Lindenbaum and Weil, of Hatton Garden, were the fortunate buyers of the 424 Napoleonic pearls. " Never such a lot in these rooms before," was the auctioneer's terse introduction of the necklace to the crowd of fashionable ladies and dealers. The ladies sighed and ' the dealers, who sat at the green baize horseshoe table, smiled.

" Ten thousand pounds" was the first bid. "Five hundred," said a dealer quickly; and then they tossed the figures, 500 at a time, from one to the other, until £19,500 was reached.

Here there was a pause. "Worth more than this," said the man in the rostrum, who had been catching the bids with a rapid succession of nods like a Chinese mandarin.

"Another hundred," -whispered a man at his elbow. Four more bids of one hundred each brought the round total to £20,000. The room applauded Mr. Lindenbaum's offer. His opponent withdrew with a smile, and the hammer fell.

"Six hundred a year invested in a necklace," was the audible comment of a lady in the audience.

It took Messrs. Christie just an hour and ten minutes to dispose of the jewels of the French lady of rank, and the total for the thirty-eight lots, including the necklace, was £38,959.

For a single pair of dark grey " Bouton pearls," mounted as earrings, £2550 was paid, and £3150 was the price of a rope of 234 graduated pearls. The beautiful ruby (lower spray from the French crown jewels went cheaplv for £1260, and an emerald corsage for £2350. It was charming to notice the unconcern with which the dealers rolled up their purchases and thrust them into their pockets. By the time the miniature of Queen Victoria as an infant of two years was produced the purchasing element in the room seemed to have exhausted itself. The portrait was withdrawn from sale at 260 guineas..

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH19010907.2.79.15

Bibliographic details

TWENTY THOUSAND POUND NECKLACE., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 11753, 7 September 1901, Supplement

Word Count
348

TWENTY THOUSAND POUND NECKLACE. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 11753, 7 September 1901, Supplement

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