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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

The American mail steaemer Alameda was 1 inspected -by the health officer yesterday jj morning, and berthed at the Queen-street I Wharf, where her passengers and mails were j at orce disembarked, and the work of t'is-1 charging cargo at once proceeded with, Hie j Alameda left for Sydney early this morn-J ing. | By instructions of the Postniaster-Gener.il, j to-day will be observed as a general day of j mourning in connection with the Government Departments. The post office will he open from nine a.m. to ten a.m., and mails usually made up after the latter time will j be closed at that hour. [ At the last monthly meeting of the Birkenhead Borough Council, Mr. J. 11. ( Witheford, M.H.R., was elected Mayor of « Birkenhead, vice Mr. 0. E. Button, le- j signed. The Council decided to make an independent valuation of the properties in the borough prioi« to the borough valuer making his valuation. It was decided to apply to the Post Office authorities lor an extended letter delivery in the borough. Mr. A. Hare was appointed dog registrar, the fee to be 5s each dog. \

The ordinary meeting of the Auckland University College Council was held on Tuesday afternoon, at the College Buildings. The Rev. W. J. Williams presided, and there were present : Messrs. Gerald Peacocke, F. E. Baume, L. J. Bagnall, and T. U. Wells. Dr. Maclaurin's resignation was received with regret, but pleasure was expressed at his being selected to fill the post of colonial analyst, at Wellington. It was decided to enter the names of all defaulting students in the minute-book of the Council, and to prohibit them from further attendance at the lectures. Accounts were passed for payment to the extent of £355 Is.

It will be learned with sincere regret that news was received by the English mail yesterday that Captain W. L. H. Brown, of H.M. Navy, died somewhat suddenly at Harwich, on December 12, death being attributed to heart failure. The deceased officer will be kindly remembered by many friends in New Zealand and Australia, as captain of the twin-screw cruiser Tauranga, on the Australasian station some years ago, and on his return to England was transferred to the Severn. Captain Brown was born in 1848, and became a naval cadet in 1860, sub-lieutenant in' 1868, lieutenant in 1872. In 1886 he was promoted to commander, and attained his captaincy in 1893. The deceased officer was a deputy-lieutenant of the County of Londonderry, and was also the holder of the silver medal of the Royal Humane Society, which was awarded him in 1871. At that time Captain Brown was a. sub-lieutenant on the China station, and jumped overboard and saved the life of Lieutenant L. Edge, R.M.L.S., who had fallen into the Victoria Harbour, Hongkong. Captain Brown was cordia'ly esteemed by the officers and crew with whom he was associated, and his untimely end is sincerely regretted.

Yesterday morning, at half-past eight, a solemn Requiem High Mass for the repose of the soul of the late esteemed and venerated Bishop Luck, 0.5.8., was sung in St. Mary's Convent Chapel, Ponsonby. His Lordship Bishop Lenihan presided at the throne, assisted by the Rev. W. H. Corcoran (St. Patrick) and the Rev. J. V. Hennessy (Onehunga). The celebrant of the mass was the Right Rev. Monsignor O'Reilly ; deacon, the Rev. F. Buckley (Hamilton); sub-deacon, the Rev. M. A. o'Carroll (St. Patrick's) ; master of ceremonies, the Rev. Father Purton (chaplain, Old Men's Heme, Shelly Beach Road). The Very Rev.' Dr. Egan, 0.5.8., presided at the organ. In the choir were the Rev. F. Hills, S.M. (Wellington), the Rev. J. Darby (St. Benedict's), and others. The " Dies Irae " was rendered in most solemn and impressive manner. His Lordship Bishop Lenihan, in full pontifical, pronounced the last absolution at the catafalque.

By the mail steamer Alameda yesterday morning a consignment of 500 Virginia quail arrived for the Nelson Acclimatisation Society. The birds arrived in very fair condition, only 150 having died on the voyage. There were also for the same society five Virginian deer, two stags and three hinds. These beautiful animals arrived in splendid condition, having apparently been well cared for on the voyage. The quail will be despatched by the Mapourika to-day for Nelson, but the deer had to be sent to • the quarantine island to undergo 60 days' quarantine, in accordance with the regulations. Mr. T. Cheeseman, secretary of the Auckland Acclimatisation Society, was to have looked after the quail and deer on behalf of the Nelson society, but he has been unfortunately weather-bound at the Little Barrier since Friday last, and the work was accordingly undertaken by some of the members of the Auckland society. The deer are the first Virginian deer imported into the colony. They are beautiful little animals, and several keen sportsmen who inspected them on the Alameda yesterday were highly delighted with their appearance.

The chairman of the Harbour Board (Mr. J. 11. Witheford) is still urging his scheme for the appointment of % first-class harbour engineer. He emphasised the matter at Tuesday's meeting of the Board, on account of a report from the engineer at the Calliope Dock with reference to the erection of the foundations to carry the large shear-legs for the wharf in connection with the dock. It appeared that the cost of this work had been estimated at £14,000, and the consent of the Admiralty had been obtained to pay £7000 of that amount. Mr. Witheford" states, however, that on the matter being fully gone into it was found that the cost had been largely underestimated, and the Board has now to approach the Admiralty and ask a further subsidy, or bear from the harbour funds the cost of the work which is now

estimated at something over £60,000. This serious mistake, he pomts out, would never have been made had the Board had in its service a permanent engineer, whose business it would have been to give approximately correct estimates, on which the subsidy from the Admiralty would have been based at the proper time.

1 Twelve of . the new railway cars ordered I from America for the New Zealand railways I arrived by the Alameda yesterday. This is J the first consignment of the 63 new cars recently ordered. A umber of the new cars are to be placed on the Auckland railways, and will be fitted up in the Auckland workshops, but the consignment which arrived yesterday are for use on the Southern railways, and are accordingly to be shipped to Lyttelton, to oe fitted up in the Addington workshops. The cars will be of a more imposing type than any now running on the New Zealand railways. They are all vestibule cars, 50ft in length, with an entrance at each end and one in the centre. There are special compartments for ladies, and all modern fittings. Separate lavatories for ladies and gentlemen are provided on each car. For conveyance from America the care were packed in sections in large cases, which will not be opened till arrival at Addington. Mr. N. J. Weaver, of Noma yacht fame, was a passenger | to Pago Pago from Ban Francisco by the mail steamer Alameda. According to reports, Mr. Weaver has succeeded in floating a company in London called the Samoan Estates (Limited), with a capital of £50,000, to take up land at Samoa and prosecute the cocoa, copra, and other industries. A change which will be welcomed by the public is to be made soon on the tramway service. Hitherto the conductors on the cars have been mostly youths, but the company have now decided to employ men as conductor!!, and provide them with nice uniforms. Some half-a-dozen men will be immediately employed and provided with uniforms, and the number will be increased from time to time, so that the public may have no cause for complaint as to the new management of the cars. A new system of purchasing tram tickets is also to be introduced, Mr. P. M. Hansen, the/Auckland attorney for the company, having received intimation from London that a> number of bell | punchers are to be sent out. The offices of | the Electric Tramway Company are now re-1 moved into the same building as the old | tramway office? 3

The weather appears to be most extraordinary weather for January, and we can scarcely , be said to have had a summer at all. Possibly we may have, in conropensation, a dry autumn. Yesterday a good deal of rain fell, so that the Western Springs will be probably back to the overflow point. Under all'the circumstances the rainfall of January will be most acceptable m Mew of the fact that there may be some demy 1 in connecting with the Nihotupu aijxiliar) | water supply. j J A pleasing ceremony took place yesterj day afternoon at Mr. J. J. Craig s new building, Breakwater Road, when the emj ployees of the various departments assemj bled to present Mr. J. J. Craig, on the j occasion of his birthday, and the new cenj tury combined, with a token of their regard and esteem. Mr. J. Lambert (wool j stores manager) spoke in suitable terms as Ito the occasion on which they were assembled. The presentation, which con--1 sisted of a massive gold albert and pendant, I suitably inscribed, with sovereign case at- | tached, was made by Mr. J. T. Hutchison, I general manager, who expressed, on behalf 1 of the Various departments, the good feeling I existing between employees and master, the I former of whom had taken this opportunity 1 of showing their appreciation by presenting I him with this token of their regard and | esteem. He called for three hearty cheers by all those present. Mr. Craig, who had been taken wholly by surprise, suitably responded, thanking the various departments for their handsome token and good wishes. He hoped that the good feeling would always exist..

It would be well for old age pensioners, who are able to do so, and whose certificates for the second year are about expiring, to call and see the deputy-registrar of the Department at their earliest opportunity, as it frequently happens that through their removing from one place to another inconveniences and delays occur, either through neglect or forgetfulness on their part to advise the officer. The postal authorities arc also frequently put to unnecessary additional work in the delayed delivery of mail matter in respect to those aged and deserving old colonists.

Yesterday Sergeant Walker reported to the coroner Mr. Ores-ham, the death of Dorothy Royal Willey, an infant aged 19 months, whose parents reside in Newton. The child accidentally fell into a bath of scalding water. The child was attended to by Dr. Goldie, but succumbed to her injuries. The ! coroner decided, under the circumstances of the case, that it was not necessary to hoid an inquest.

In addition to the sale of 45 acres of land at Swanson, recently sold by Messrs. Burrow and Co., for subdivision of the town frontage into building sections, the linn now report a further sale of 19 acres and cottage (adjoining property) from Mr. Alfred Berry to Mrs. E. Livingstone, at a satisfactory price.

During the year ending March 31, ISOO, the Waitemata County Council received the sum of £55 18s Bd, as interest, at the rate of 10 per cent, on overdue rates. After Thursday next, the 31st inst., the same penalty will be imposed on rates for the current year.

The largest shipment of cigarettes ever landed in Auckland, arrived by the f.s. Alameda. They were shipped from New York overland, and they came through by mail, the quantity being 2,500,000. A store and dwelling belonging to Mrs. Sarah, of Hakaru, situated at Te Topuni, was burned down on Tuesday morning. The origin of the fire is unknown.

Mr. Cyril Towsey will give a recital on the organ tit St. Sepulchre's Church, • this evening. Many beautiful items are included in the programme, and a musical treat of special interest may be looked for. The recital will be preceded by a performance of the " Dead March" (" Saul") on the organ, in harmony with the thoughts' of all loyal subjects of our dear departed Sovereign.

Gas consumers are reminded that Friday next, the 25th inst., at five p.m., is the last day on which discount will be allowed cn their accounts.

The picnic of the Holy Trinity Sundayschool, Devonport, which was to have been held to-day, has been postponed on account of the Queen's death.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 11559, 24 January 1901

Word Count
2,091

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVIII, Issue 11559, 24 January 1901

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