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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

jje Registrar of Electors (Mr. John King) aD tl his staff art now busily engaged giving instruction and obtaining details, forms, transfers, and other information in respect to the City of Auckland, Parnell, Manukau, and Eden' electorates. Persons desirous of obtaining information concerning electoral qualifications. Trill find the official rolls at their disposal, indexed and ready for inspection, and all organisations and societies can obtain complete returns of all matters on prepayment of 6d tor every 72 words, the proceeds thus derived going to the public ailcount. The preparation of the new register will entail a great deal of work in the nature of alterations and revisions, but already the work is well in hand 011 the City of Auckland register. The police have evidently rendered valuable assistance to Mr. King''din-in? the nast 12 months in obtaining the required information as to deaths, absences, transfers, and changes in the four electorates under that officer's supervision, while the information has also been supplemented by official returns supplied by the registrar of births, deaths, and marriages. The registrars in all other of the provincial electoral districts have been instructed by the Under-Secretary to make a. house-to-house canvass in order that all not registered may be placed on the roll, and the same mode of procedure will be followed as that at present adopted in the city and suburban Parliamentary divisions. Nothing is vet known as to when the rolls will lie authorised to be completed, but it would be well that, am- persons who may have been overlooked should make early application to have their names placed on the electoral roll, in view of the possible early instructions for the preparation of the lists for printing. The office above the side entrance to the Government Insurance Buildings, Queenstreet is open daily from nine a.m. to five p m.. with the exception of Saturdays, when the office hours are from nine a.m. to one p.m. The tender of Mr. R. H. McCallum, of £1477, for the North Head tunnel, in connection with the Devonport drainage scheme, which was accepted a fortnight ago by the Council, was thrown ip by the tenderer, who, at a special meeting held last week, passed a resolution to the effect that Mr. McCallum's deposit be forfeited, and that he be debarred from tendering for borough work for five rears, the next tender, that of J as. Mays and Co., £1899 being accepted. Mr. McCallum, in a letter to the Council, explained that in his calculations lie had omitted to allow for the cost of pumping air into the drive, and for insuring the men, and had greatly under-estimated the cost of the biacksmithing necessary.

The Journal of the Department of Labour for June is to hand. The following is the report as to the state of the labour market:—At Russell the building trades are stated to be fairly good at present, and the retail trade (general) good up to average. Qumdigging is fairly good, considering the ground lias been worked over many times. There are very few persons out (if employment in the district. As to Auckland, the building trades are steadily busy. In llio engineering trades there is a slight, improvement on last month. Ihe boot trade is quiet, and showing signs of improvement, In the clothing trade the factories are quiet-, finishing up the season. Tailoring (order) is fairly busy. There is little variation from month to month in the retail trade (general), which is fairly good. As respects unskilled labour, there is a slight increase of applicants, owing m; country workers coining to town during winter, and town work beinj, limited. At Gisborne the building trades continue brisk, but. owing to prevailing wet weather, men have not been employed full time. The retail trade (general) 'is dull. A number of bushfelling contracts have been let. There is a sufficient supply of local labour. Many road works lmve had to be suspended on account of bad weather, thus throwing a miinbei of men out of employment. Several parties who wore engaged on Government co-operative works have come into town, work being discontinued. The following is a return of the number of men employed on co-operative works under Government Departments for the month of May: —Survey Department, 1546 labourers; Public Works Department, 153 artisans, 1154 labourers; Labour Department farm (also 10 families); total, 3 artisans, 20 labourers: grand total, 2876. Out Thames correspondent telegraphs thatquite a large number ot Austrian? have arrived at Thames, per the Auckland steamers, during the past week oi two, en route for the gumfields.

A case of interest, especially to brokers, was board at the Supreme Court yesterday, by His Honor Mr. Justice Conolly. Messrs. Francis, Hull, and Co., sued Mi. G. A. Buttle, and asked that they be indemnified in respect of the liability on 50 shares in the New Zealand Loan and Mercantile Agency Company, sold by plaintiffs to defendant. The liability amounts to about £306. His Honor gave judgment for the plaintiffs, with costs on the middle scale. A report of the case appears elsewhere.

A lumper named Benjamin Taylor yesterday met with an accident by falling down the hold of the s.s. Pukaki. He was very severely bruised and shaken, but- not more seriously injured. He was removed to his home, where his injuries were attended to by Dr. Bedford.

The Birkenhead and Northcote Fruitgrowers' Association Committee have this week decided to renew the agreement with the Institute for the Blind for the making of strawberry boxes for the coming season. Last year 50,000 boxes were used, representing over £200. It is expected that the output this year will be increased 50 per cent.

The date of the closing of entries for the examinations in connection with the Royal Academy oi Music has been extended for a few days, so that intending candidates sendiii" in their names to the local secretary. Mr. W° Wallace Kidd. may sit at the forthcoming examination, which will be held about October next.

The Rev. C. H. Yatman, who will be remembered for his successful mission in Auckland, is at present in Sydney (New South Wales), holding a mission. He visits the other Australian colonies, and will be here at the end of the year. Mr. \atman has visited India, Africa, China, and Japan, in which latter empire he spent a month, the educated Jap, he says, is an Agnostic. At Tokio lie held a meeting at which his hearers came from the Imperial University' and the hi oh schools, and of these 70 stood forward and expressed their desire to accept Christianity He promised, when he left Japan, to no back for a whole year's mission when the" Siberian railroad is finished. Ihe reason for that is that he intends travelling across Siberia. He expects the Siberian railway to lie finished in four years. Being interviewed by the Sydney Daily lelegniph, lie is reported as follows : — China, lie observed, "is disintegrated. Russia has Manchuria, and, when the railway is through China, will be fixed. Virtually the British Empire controls the gateway of Southern China, and Russia that of Northern China. England, he holds, has not been euchred 111 China. "The paw of the lion lias caused the doors of China to be opened, bay what von please, but British diplomacy, which accomplished these things, is better than war, for war is hell." Mr. Yatman has recently visited Africa. He regards the stilts of the Transvaal as precarious. The boom is over, i and the condition of things is below the noimal. Mr. Yatman met President Kruger twice. " The centre and circumference of the Boer, as was the case with France in the days of Napoleon, are one individual, and that individual is Kruger." Mr. Yatman's last port of call, before reaching Sydney, was Manila, and, shrewd American that he is, he soon made up his mind as to how_ things were going m the disturbed Philippine Group. "Uncle Sam had suddenly thrust upon him triplets," characteristically observed the evangelist. The reference was to Cuba. Manila, and Puerto Rico. "But he has had so many children that lie doesn't worry about these! I left- Manila on the same day that Admiral Dewey started on his return, and anybody who knows Dewey knows that his leaving means the practical ending of the | war, though the Filipinos will probably carry on guerilla warfare in the mountains for some time to come. It will be the same story there as with the Maoris in New Zealand, and the Indians in America. But there can only be one ending, and that the ultiniate supremacy of the Anglo-Saxon Power. Anybody who understands United States legislation, and Republican Government, such as we have, knows that the ultimate for these people will be liberty. Wherever the AngloSaxon goes there go religion and liberty) and an open door for the world. Liberty is in tha blood of the Anglo-Saxon." ' ~ ,^|

I The 32 mules for the Colonial Sugar Ke- ; fining Company, which came down from : San Francisco by the mail steamer Moaqa, :on her last trip, and which have been quarantined at Motuihi in the meantime, were brought up from the island in a scow yesterday, and transhipped into the s.s. Upolu for Fiji. During the transferring of the animals to the steamer sotne rather lively scenes occurred, and some of the men, who were engaged in the work, had several narrow escapes, the mule's inherent right to kick at anything and everything within range on the slightest provocation, being strongly in evidence. The animals, which are intended for work on the company's sugar estates at Fiji, are a fine lot of beasts, and are in splendid condition. Daniel Seamer, whose death occurred a few days ago at the Ivew Lunatic Asylum, was (says the Melbourne Argus) one of the Light Brigade who dashed down the slopes of Balaclava in 1853. Seamer was born 74 years ago at Little Berry Green, in the village of Saffron Waldon, Essex. At the age of 18 he went to Kent and enlisted in the 11th Hussars. In this regiment it is extremely probable that he saw service ii: other lands than the Crimea, for, in his description, taken by the Lunacy Department, his wounds appeal so many that one campaign could scarcely account for all. Seamer , had a large scar on the shoulder, apparently a ' slash from a sword, a bullet-wound, distort- , ing the bones of his right forearm ; a gash over the left temjtle—in all probability the | injury which caused him to lose his reason —a stab on the outer side of the left thigh, and other small wounds over his body and I arms. During the 39 years he passed in the . lunatic asylum, the old man could tell little concerning himself. He was not, like most , of the patients, sane on all subjects but one. The past seemed a blank to him, and , he could give no consecutive account of his | history, though at times his uncontrolled , imagination saw the Valley of Death before him again, and caused him to cry to the comrades long dead and gone, whom lie felt ' riding by his side, to tackle the Russian " ranks once more. But as a rule, the old man > was quiet and moody.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVI, Issue 11096, 22 June 1899

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1,885

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXVI, Issue 11096, 22 June 1899

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