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OBITUARY.

• Q Iff DEATH OF MR. EDWIN HESKETH. y,, Edwin Hesketh (of the firm of 4 ' Jfessrs. Hesketh and Richmond, solicitors), T'f'dicd on J" }' 23 at llis residcnce > St ' John's flood, Epsom, at the comparatively early fp&ra of 65. Mr. Hesketh had been for years mi failing health, and laid aside from busitpiess for several weeks past, so that his Hi death was not unexpected. For some 30 $ years past lie had been identified with the city and its public affairs,'and at one time Setoff an active interest in secondary educaS' tion. He served his articles in Auckland, . and was * or years a leading member of the : j ar , until growing deafness incapacitated t? from appearing in the Courts. The last great case ™ which he appeared as leading counsel, associated with his brother, Mr. Samuel Hesketh, was the trial of Scott for | the murder of Mr. Thompson at Waikomiti. The deceased bore the highest reputation in his profession, and it is understood that a I judgeship was within his reach if the access; of deafness at that juncture had not debarred him from accepting it. He was widely respected by all who knew him as a jjan of kindly disposition and the strictest integrity. The deceased gentleman leaves a widow and grown-up family of sons and daughters. j ■ The funeral of deceased took place on July 25 and was one of the most largelyattended in the Epsom district for many , years past. The cortege left deceased's ref* sidence, St- John's Wood, Epson, at lialf•V- past three, for St. Mark's cemetery, Kemuera, of which church deceased was an earnest and devoted member. There were over 50 carriages, and the numbers on foot at the cemetery also testified to the general esteem in which the late Mr. Hesketh was ■ held. The chief mourners were Messrs. Charles and Samuel Hesketh (brothers), the sons, and the sons-in-law of deceased (Messrs. Shipherd and R. Johnstone). Among those present were His Honor Mr. Justice Conolly, the Law Society was represented by Messrs. C. K. Button (president), jas. Russell (vice-president), A. E. Devore, Hugh Campbell, F. Earl, Thos. Cotter, F. E. Ikume, J. A. Beale, E. W. Burton (Council), Bassett (secretary), also following members of the jirofession, Hon. J. A. Tole (Crown Prosecutor), Dr. Laishley, Tlieo. Cooper, W. Coleman, W. Thome, J. W. Stewart, C. J. Parr, E. A. Mackechnie, W. R. Bloomfield, W. H. Armstrong, E. Maliony, W- E. Bruce, C. Calder, Goldwater, 0. Purehas, J. R. Reed, W. J. Hill, A. Broock, Nicholson, i'. A, Vaile, Thos. Buddie, W. J. Napier, C. J. Tunks, F. W. Brookfield, P. Bottley, P. Oliphant; Rev. G. B. Monro (St. Luke's Presbyterian Church), Hon. E. Mitchclson, Dr. Campbell, Professor Tubbs, Rev. D. W. Runciman (Registrar New Zealand University), Captain ti. F. Anderson, Messrs, W. S. Cochrane (Diocesan secretary), R. Udy (Auckland College and Grammar School), D. W. . Dutliie (National Bank), H. Roes-George (Portuguese Consul), D. L. Murdoch, W. • Aitken, T. Peacock, F. Hull, E. Lewis, Greer, Grierson, W. Ware, J. Marshall, W. Morgan, A. L. Edwards, W. Hogg, D. Fallon, C- Swanson, Dervin, Jas. Home, Jas. Maekay, Norton, Turner, B. Kent, W. Ledingham, W. S. Lyell, Jas. Lyell, W. F. Innes, W. C. Somers, L. Neuinegcn, J. H. Upton, W. D. Cossar, C. C. Otway, P. Darby, M. Corcoran, F. Waller, A. Waller, J. W. Hall, B. C. Roberts, J. Hardie (Porter and Co.), Carr, Johnstone, W. Johnson, Lennox, C. Ranson, Jas. ilacfarlano, Elliot, Thos. Morrill, A. N. Nathan (L. D. Nathan and Co.), A. Bull, Kidd, W. H. Johnston, Anderson, Jun.,,J. M. Mowbray, J. M. Shera, G. M. Reed, H. N. Garland, A. 'Hanna, E. N. Russell, Brabazon, H. B. Morton, E. Morton, W. C. Walker, J. Brown, B. Brown, H. King, Keesing, E. Wood, J. Winks, Sanders W. Culpan, ii. Reid, A. P. Wilson, F. E. Claude, Littlejohn, H. Giliillan, jun., S. E. Hughes, A. Buckland, Cheeseman, W. Jones, W. F. Wilson, C. W. Hemery, Kelly, etc. Among those present in the church were Most Rev. the Primate, Archdeacon Dudley, Canon Nelson, Revs. Geo. MacMurray, and J. K. Davis, but the vicar conducted tile service throughout. When the Supreme Court opened for the civil sittings on July 25, feeling references were made to Mr. Hesketh's decease. There was a large attendance of the Bar, including Mr. C. E. Button (president of the Law Society), Dr. Laishley, Messrs. Then. Cooper, Campbell, Thomas Cotter, James Russell, iiaume, Clayton, T. Buddie, Tunks, Purchas, Earl, Pan', McGregor, Brookfield, Bassett (secretary Law Society), and others. At the Auckland Police Court on July 25 Dr. Laishley, on behalf of the Bar, referred to the decease of the late Mr. Edwin Hesketh. THE DEATH OF SIR F. D. BELL. Sir Francis Dillon Bell, K.C.M.G., C.8., died at Shag Valley on July 15. He was the second and eldest surviving son of Edward Bell, of Hornsey (who died in 1864), by Fanny, daughter of the Rev. J. Matthews, of Cirencester (she died in 1870), came of a family which, through Robert Barclay, of Urie, the Quaker apologist, claims descent from the blood royal of England. He was born on October 8, 182-2, and educated in France. In 1839 lie entered the service of the New Zealand Company, and for a time was assistant secretary, and afterwards secretary, in London. He 3migrated to New Zealand shortly, after the settlement of Wellington and" New Plymouth, and was agent of the company till 1850 at Nelson, Auckland, New Plymouth, and elsewhere. In 1848 lie was called to the Legislative Council at New Minister, but resigned in 1850. In 1846 lie was made J.l'., and in 1851, upon the surrender of the charter of the New Zealand Company, he became Commissioner of Crown Lands. In 1853 he entered the Provincial Council of Wellington, where he remained for three years; and in 1854 he was called to the Legislative Council, and held office without portfolio from June 30 to July 11, under the system of semi-responsible government which then obtained. Mr. Bell was Colonial Treasurer in the first responsible Ministry (formed by Mr. Sewell and himself) from May 7 to May 20, 1856. In the same year lie was appointed Commissioner of Land Claims, which office lie hold till 1862. He was Colonial Treasurer (August 6 to 21, 1862), Minister for Native Affairs (August 6, 1862, to October 30, 1863), and Commissioner of Customs (August 7 to 21, 1862), in the Domett Ministry. Of the Fox Ministry lie was a member without portfolio from July 2, 1869, to August 14, 1871. It was, however, in his capacity of Commissioner of Land Claims, from 1856 to 1862, and as Special Commissioner on the West Coast of • the North Island from 1879 to 1881, that lie rendered the most eminent services to He colony. In 1862 he went with Mr. Gorst to Australia, and succeeded in raising a force of military settlers to plant in the disturbed Waikato district. In 1864 he removed to Otago, and in the following year was' elected to the Provincial Council. In • 1866 lie was elected once more to Parliament • for the constituency of Mataura. In 1869 : he went to England, in company with Dr. I p Featherston, on a special commission to raise fresh forces for the colony, and to obv, tain the Imperial guarantee to a loan of .. £1,000,000 for immigration and public works. In this latter difficult task the commissioners were entirely successful. He . returned to Otago in 1871, and re-entering Parliament was elected Speaker of the House s of Representatives, which office he held for ft, years. In 1873 he was made a Knight ; Bachelor, and in 1877 was nominated to the Legislative Council. In 1881 Sir Francis : succeeded Sir Julius Vogel as Agent-General for New Zealand, and held the position till §&•§? autumn of 1891, when he returned -to jew Zealand. It is only just to say that during the whole 10 years of his regime he lis 1 - was not only a most able and single-minded representative of his own colony, but was . i. recognised by the Agents-General of the ;V. Australian colonies as their leader in all rePresentations to the Colonial Office on the Complicated subject of Australasian relations 'a the Western Pacific, including the ani nexation of New Guinea, the New Hebrides S!v bro $ 0 ' an( the Recidivist influx. At 'he Colonial and Indian Exhibition in 1886 yr he was Executive Commissioner, and in 1889 ■ - * a 8 not only Executive Commissioner for "• «ew Zealand at the Paris Exhibition, but 'it"'n a 8 a l so 11 member of tie Mansion House •. Committee. For his services . in this eon- ■ ation the French Government bestowed "pon him the Commandership of the Legion ; V'; ™ Honour. 1887 he was delegate to the • ! gonial Conference. ~ Sir Francis Bell was lighted K.C.M.G. in 1881, and C.B. in 1886. He ; married on April 2, 1849, Margaret, daughter of A. Hort. <V; In. 1891 he received 'ho thanks of the Legislative Council for his J/services. : He returned to New Zealand in November, 1891, but left again for Eflgl#

LYlff w Lady 8011 died on Zealand snm!' r H - again returned to New Zealand some time ago in failing health, ana, as stated above, parsed away yesterday afternoon at the age of 76. } J

Mr. George Friend, Clerk of House of Representatives, died at Wellington on Tuesday morning, the 19th of July. He was the highest officer of the House, and for many years had performed his duties in a most able and painstakinng manner.' Mr. aid, "° was about- sixty years of age, was a native of London, where his lather was for many years AccountantGeneral for India, first in the East India Company s service and afterwards in the Imperial service. The deceased received his earlier education at a private school at YYeathorhead, near Dorking, in Surrey, and aiterwards at King's College and the University of London, where he remained for three years, and took high honours. Although entered at Trinity College, Cambridge, he did not long continue his University career, but left England in August, 1853, taking passage to New Zealand by the Hamilla Mitchell, and arriving in New Zealand shortly before the termination of the first Governorship of Sir George Grey, to whom he had brought letters of introduction. In the following year Mr. Friend joined the Government sen-ice in the department of Dr. Knight, the AuditorGeneral. After four years he was promoted to a position under the Commissioner for Land Purchase (Sir Donald McLean), in whose department he worked till 1863. In that year Mr. Friend was appointed Clerkassistant to the House of Kepresentatives, which position he retained until 1889, when he succeeded Major Campbell as Clerk of House. When the House met on July 19 the Speaker made feeling reference to the death of Mr. Friend, and after a few words from the Premier and Mr. Rolleston, the House, as a mark of respect, adjourned till halfpast seven p.m. A graceful tribute to the memory of deceased was paid by the great number of friends that attended his funeral. The principal mourners were Miss Friend and Mrs. J. E. Fitzgerald, Sir .Maurice O'Rorke, the permanent officers of the House of Representatives, and Mr. Curnin, Parliamentary draftsman. Among the others in the procession were the Premier, Captain Russell, and members of both Upper and Lower Houses, Mr. Amelius Smith, the Hon. T. W. Hislop, Dr. Martin, Mr. Grattan Gray, and Mr. C. C. N. Barron. Deceased was interred at the Karori Cemetery, Wellington, where the Rev. Mr. Dasent conducted a service in the mortuary chapel and at the graveside. Among the numerous floral offerings sent were wreaths from the Speaker and officers of the House. Mr. and Mrs. Otterson, Mr. W. Watson. Mr. R. M. Simpson, Dr. and Mrs. Grace, members of the Ministry, private secretaries to Ministers, the Hansard staff, committee clerks of the House, and the Karori Cricket Club. A few days ago there died an old resident of Auckland, Mrs. Barron. Her husband, who has been dead for many years, was a pensioner from the 93rd Highlanders, and the couple came to Auckland in 1846, 52 years ago, in the ship Sir George Seymour. In our obituary column will bo found recorded the death of a very old settler, in the porson of Mr. John Houghton, on Saturday July 23, at the age of 84. Mr. Houghton arrived in Auckland some 37 years ago. He was a member of the Baptist denomination, and was for many years one of tho officers of the Tabernacle Church when the congregation met in Wellesley-streot. Ho leaves a grown-up family of four sons and three daughters. _ The death is announced of William Tandy, aged 96. He came to the colony in 1841, and was probably tho oldest resident of the Hutt district.

A man named King met his death under peculiar circumstances at the l'icton Hospital recently. He was sitting at the dinner table, and when asked if he bad finished no reply came. On examination the man was found to be dead, a piece of meat having stuck in his throat. Another old settler has passed away in the person of Mrs. Win. Rattray, sen., who died on July 13, at her residence, Grafton Road. The' deceased lady arrived here with her husband in 1853. A Maori woman who died at Taueru, near Masterton, recently, is said to have reached the age of 103 years. Walter Miller, a well-known runholdcr of Southern Otago in the " sixties," died on July 16. Readers will regret to hear of the death of Mr. R. Kelly, at the age of 44. Mr. Kelly has been connected with the Bank of New Zealand for about 20 years, the last 18 months of which were spent in Cambridge. It will be seen from our obituary column that another colonist has gone over to the great majority, in the person of Mr. Francis Charles Lewis, who died at his residence, Remuera, on July 17, at the age of 18. In 1862 he entered the public service, and was for years chief inspector of stock in the Auckland district. About 10 years ago lie reiied, and has since lived at Remuera. The deceased served through the Maori war, holding a commission as captain. Our readers will notice with regret in our obituary column tho decease recorded of Major Lambert, formerly of the Military Train, and an old colonist, who passed away on Julv 13, at his residence, Epsom, at the well-advanced age of 77. Major Lambert- was all through the Crimea war. and was present at. the battles of the Alma, Inkerman. the attack on the Redan, and at the fall cf Sevastopol, September 8, 1898. He took part in the expedition to Kinburn, and was present at the surrender of the garrison. Major Lambert was employed in the demolition of the docks at Sebastopol. Subsequently served with the expedition in North China in 1860-1, and was at the capture of the Tuku forts, under Sir Hope Grant, _ He came to New Zealand with the Military Train, serving in the Waikato and West Coast campaigns, under General Cameron and Sir Trevor Chute. Major Lambert held the Crimea medal with clasps for Alma, Inkerman. and Sebastopol, and also the Turkish Crimean medal, the China medal, with clasp, for the Taku forts, and the New Zealand war medal. We have to announce the death of Mrs. F. Matheson, one of the earliest identities of Kamo, who passed away at her daughters (Mrs. Munro) residence at Kamo on July 2 at the ripe old age of 87. Mrs. Matheson, relict of the late Mr. K. Matheson, of Ilikurangi, arrived in New Zealand from St. Anns, Cape Breton, by the ship Ellen Lewis, on May 11, 1860. She leaves behind her three daughters, two sons, 40 grandchildren, and 43 great-grandchildren. Intelligence has been received from Sydney of the death of an old Aucklander, in the person of Mrs. Naughton, the relict of Ills late Mr. Jas. Naughton, for many years Commissioner of Police in this city, and subsequently Resident Magistrate at Onelmnga. The deceased lady had attained the age of 81. Mr. Haslam, late Sergt.-Major of the Auckland Volunteers,• and who served in the same regiment (the 58th) as a comrade with Mr. Naughton, sends the following particulars concerning the early personal history of the deceased lady.Mrs. NaUghton accompanied her husband, who was then a colour-sergeant of the 58th regiment, in the Hutt and Wanganui campaigns against the rebel Maoris in the early forties. She was at the post known as Boulcott's Farm, on 'the River Hutt, Wellington, when the natives attack® the post, and massacred a number of the guard in the early morning. They broke into the house in which she resided, knowing that it was used as a position by the troops. Mis. Naughton and her children were in the house at the time, but the natives did not injure them. She "held up her baby before the Maoris, and called out to them, appealing^ "The picaninny! my picaninny! When the regiment went to Wanganui she accompanied her husband, and was there when the rebels surrounded the town; she witnessed the attack, and on the engagement in July, 1847. at St. John's Bush, rendered good service in tending the wounded, as she had previously done at the action a Bouh cott's Farm. She was a noble-heal ted and motherly woman, in aiding and sympathising with those who needed consolation. She left Auckland for Sydney a few years ago, in order to live with her married daugfiter. Mrs. Naughton had a large familyHer death was regretted by those of our citizens who knew her jn the early days o . the history of the colony. We regret to announce the death of sir. Jas. Moron,' one of the earliest identities of settlement in this colony, who passed away at his residence in Brougham-street, Wellington, on July 11. , Mr. Moran was of sterling honesty and uprightness, one, as has been said of him, whose word was his bond.: ; ' Mr. Charles Parker, who for several years represented ' Motueka in • the Nelson vincial Council, and subsequently in the -New isew'Zealand Parliament, died at the age ot 90. "He was'an'early settler, arriving in Nelson in 1849. •7:/

A cable was received on the 30th of July from the Rev. Thos. Spurgeon, announcing the death of Mr. J. T. Garlick, in London, of congestion of the lungs. The public had been partially prepared for the sad tidings by the statement in our columns that a cablegram had been received' during that week stating that he was in a very low state. Much sympathy was felt and expressed for the bereaved wife and family, inasmuch as Mrs. Garlick had to leave the deathbed of her father to proceed to London, with her young son, and as she would only reach New York on August 1, she has been deprived of the melancholy satisfaction of seeing the last hours of either her father or her husband. Mr. Garlick arrived in the colony in 1863, and held a responsible position on the staff of the Southern Cross. During the Caledonian mining boom he became a sharebroker, and was very successful in his mining speculations. A few years afterwards he bought into the business of Holloway and Co., and ultimately succeeded to the entire business. Mr. Garlick then commenced tho furnishing business, associating with him Mr. Cranwell, the firm becoming known as Garlick and Cranwell, Ultimately he bought out Mr. Cranwell, and last year turned the business into the Tonson - Garlick Company (Limited). He was an active member of the Auckland Baptist Tabernaclo, one of its deacons, and church treasurer. Mr. Garlick made a present of the handsome ornamental railing of the rostrum to the Tabernacle, and also gave a large sum to the church debt before his departure for England, and had a scheme in hand for its ultimate extinguishment. He took great interest in temperance and philanthropic work. Deceased leaves a wife and three sons (two of whom are married), and two daughters. The sons are in the business. It will be seen by our obituary column that another old colonist lias passed away, in tho person of Mr. James Dickey (of the firm of Messrs J. and J. Dickey, ironmongers), at the comparatively early age of 62, at his residence, City Road. Sir. Dickey arrived here with his brother, Mr, John Dickey, and his sister (Mrs. A. 11. Watson) in the ship Portland, in 1863. The two brothers started in business as ironmongers, above Milne and Choyce's, Queenstreet, where they carried on a large and successful business. Mr. John Dickey died in 1879, but the firm was carried on under the old style of Messrs J. and J. Dickey to the present. Deceased leaves a widow, tlireo sons, and four daughters (one son and one daughter being married), and one grandchild. Mr. Dickey was a native of the North of Ireland, anil was born at Rutford, near Belfast. In another column appears the obituary notice of the lato Captain John Penhaligon, who passed away at his residence, Ponsonby, at the age of 70, after a very lengthy illness of several years duration. Ho was a native of Truro, and at an early age joined the Royal Navy. He was in the naval engagement of St. Jean d'Arc, in 1848, and received a medal and clasp for the operations on the Syrian coast. He retired from the service and entered the mercantile service first of all, and afterwards the Government service as an official of the Customs Department, Falmouth. He emigrated to New Zealand in 1876, and was for somo time in the Auckland coasting trade, and also acted as relieving lighthousekeeper on the coast of New Zealand. Deceased leaves a widow, two daughters, and a son. , „ .. 11 On July 27th tho death of Mr. Duncan McLennan, at his residence, "Fernaig," Papakura, on the 26th inst., at the ripe age of 89, was announced in our columns. Mr. McLennan, who was un Inverness man, emigrated to Australia in 1837, and came to Auckland in 1843. He was the first settler in Papakura, going into the valley in 1848, and the first church service was held in his house. Deceased was noted for his hospitality. He leaves a widow and three sons and daughters. Mr. McLennan was buried at Papakura on Thursday last, tho funeral being well attended by the settlers of the district, and the service was conducted by the Rev. T. Norrie. A very old colonist died at Napier recently in the person of Mrs. Martha Duff, mother of Mr. J. W. Duff. The deceased lady, who was 77 years of age, arrived m Auckland in 1841, and has ever since resided in the North Island, coming to Hawke's Bay about six years ago. _ Mr E. '1-' Harris, one of Gisuorncs prominent settlers, has died at the age of 68. lie was born there, his lather oeing the first trader to settle on the hast Coast. Another old identity lias passed away in the person of Captain Peter Matzen, who died on July 10 at the age of 60 years, after a somewhat painful illness. Iho deceased was a well-known coasting captain.

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OBITUARY., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXV, Issue 10824, 5 August 1898, Supplement

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OBITUARY. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXV, Issue 10824, 5 August 1898, Supplement

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