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SPORTING.

RACING FIXTURES. (lEW ZEIUNU/ October 19,20— PoTerty Bay Turf Club October 21, North Otato Jockey Club. November 9—Kaiteratahi BMUg Club . NoVember 6,9.10-Aucklind Racing Club. _ Norember 9, U, a»i Jockey CllK December 27-Taunui** Hwk Racing .Jub. December 27, as-Northern W«ito* lUcingClub. December 27, Jockey Clubr " • • . December 27, January I,3—Aucilana K&ciHg Ulut Jan'uiryl, 3-Hincitikei Bacrnj Club. January 1,3r-H»wke'« Bay Jockey Club. .< '. February 10, 12-Canterbury Jockey Club. March 16,17-Hawke's Bay Jockey Club. March 23,21, 25-punedin Jockey Club. April 11, 12—Canterbury Jockey Club. April 11,12, Auckland Racing Club. June 4, 6—Auckland Racine Club. .. , . Australia. ■ October Victoria Amateur Turf Club. October 30, Norenber 2, 4,B—Victoria Racing Club ANSWERS to correspondents. .'Selector.— was got by Musket; Nelson by Kin; Cole; Vanguard by Inducer. The butnamed was taken to Australia, but be nerer rated there. J. H., Waiorongomai.- te the list at published by the Sydney Referee, there are only two black horses (Sunbury and Nor'-Kast) engaged in the Melbourne Cup. NOTES BY PHAETON. THE VICTORIA AMATEUR TURF GLOB'S STRING MEETING. The above club opened their Spring Meeting on Saturday last at Caulfield, and as it usually the case, the principal create claimed a large amount of local attention. The Caulfield Stakes, which event is run over nine furlongs, at weight-for-age, with penalties attached, drew out a capital field, of which the A.J.C. Derby winner, Amberite, wasconsideied to be the one most likely to «core, and he was made favourite. However, he seems to have cut a most inglorious figure, and took no hand in the finish, which was fought out by Coil and Key, the former winning in great style by several lengths. As Coil had a 71b penalty in the saddle which raised his weight to the respeotable burden of 9sc 71b his performance has a good deal of brilliancy about it, and it may be said to be the best that he has registered. Aurum made small work of those that opposed him in the Caulfield Guineas, and after the son of Trenton had taken up the running six furlongs from home the issue was sever in doubt. That there were some grounds for the move that was made against Aurum for the Derby a fortnight back is shown to have been the case, as his near fore foot (owing evidently to its having split) had to be wax-threaded. As immediately after the Caulfield race the bookmakers stipulated odds of 3 to 1 on from would-be backers of Mr. Wilson's colt for the Derby, he would appear to have pulled up sound, albeit a cablegram states that his injured foot bled after his efforts in the Guineas. If that really is so, there is plenty of reason to stand off Aurum, for, with every prospect of the ground becoming harder as the year advances, that circumstance will be all against Aurum getting to the post at Flemington, The following is a list of winners of the Caulfield Guineas:— Yr.. Owner. Winner. Sire. Time 1881 Capt. Rossi .. Wbeatear .. Epigram .. 149 1882 Hon. W.Pearson Fryingpan.. B't'L Green 147 1883 Mr. J. Aldridge Sarditis .. Emulation 146 1884 Mr. W. Gordon Saudil .. Winterlakel 60 1885 Mr. J.Wilson, jr. Ringmaster First King 148 1886 Hon. W. Long Maudelina.. Neckersgat 146 1887 Hon. J. White Carlyon ..Chester ..140 . 1888 Hon. J. White Volley .. Musket .. 148 1889 Hon. J. White Rudolph .. Martini-Hy 1 49J 1890 Mr. W. Bailey Aimesley .. Neckersgat 147* 1891 Mr W.R. Wilson Strathmore Nofenfeldt 1 441 1892 Mr..l. B.Clark Autonomy .. Chester ..1451 1893 Mr. F. Purches Patron .. G. Flaneur I 46} 1894 Mr. <;. M. Lloyd Cobbity ~ Abercorn.. 144 1895 .Mr. W.R. Wilson Wallace ..Carbine ..1451 1893 Mr. S. G. Cook The Officer.. R'hnCrusoe 144? 1897|Mr.W.R.Wil.mn Aiirnin .. Trenton ..146} Cocos, the high-priced full brother to Coil, for whom the Victorian sportsman, Mr. W. Bailey, paid 1150 guineas last autumn, proved himself to be a good colt, by securing the rich Debutant Stakes from a large field. The winner is engaged in the Maribyrnong Plate, for which be has incurred a penalty of 101b by bis victory in the Debutant Stakes, and his impost will therefore be raised to 9st 61b. To-day the Caulfield Cup will be brought op tor decision, and with 28 horses still engaged in that race, the task of finding the winner is (still one of great 'difficulty. Ayrshire, who has been left at the top of the list, has shown himself to be suite master of weight, and under Bst 91b he should be able to render a good account of himself. It is thought in some quarters that Ayrshire will not be able to live out to the end of a fast run mile and a half; but that is a note ot alarm that has many times been sounded only to be completely stifled when the quadruped, singled out as a non-stayer, has romped heme in front, and Ayrshire may be another to prove that he has been summed up quite wrongly. Still, there is this against Ayrshire, that he invariably hangs out, after getting over a mile, which would appear to show that ho does not like a journey. The Sydney-owned Parthenopseus (7st 121b) has been responsible for some really excellent work since being transported to Victoria, and unless the parties connected with the son of Splendorare miking a grievious error, he will run a great race for first honours. Trent (7st 101b) has been puting in some good work on the track, but the manner in which he lias run up and down in the quotations is not at all reassuring that' the Caulfield Cup will be his errand, and I cannot tor that reason ally myself with him. Key (7st 81b) is evidently a most genuine little filly; but her. diminutive size will, it is thought, tell against her in a race of this character. The little daughter of Padlock will, however, 1 think, succeed in beating more than beat her. Prior to meeting with his defeat in the Caulfield Stakes, the chance of Amberite taking a prominent hand in the Cup finish seems to be a very likely circumstance, but he has on the strength ot his indifferent display on the opening day lost casts. Still it may not be altogether safe to hastily write him out, especially as his party have him well backed. If Rosella (6st 81b) is really as good as she is held to be, then the race would appear to be a really " good thing" for the daughter of Trenton and Pardon. Under Such a weight Rosella should be able to set her opponen a very stiff task to bring about her defeat. To sum up the whole matter, it seems to me, after a patient consideration of the knotty problem attaching to the Cup, that I cannot do better than anticipate the placing of the judge thus— Rosella, ParthenopjCDS, Key. The following is a list of the horses left in the Cup

t Including 71b penalty. * Including 61b penalty. The Victorian writer "Nunquam Dormio" has many a time unearthed the winner of a big race ill his unique way of reasoning, Here is one of his latestl have been studying the Caulfield Cup weights very narrowly of late, and have arrived at the conclusion that, fit and well on the day, Key must run » great little filly under 7s 181b. Certainly the daughter of Padlock and Governess is only a handful, buc she possesses such a phenomenal burst of speed, and appears to develop staying powers as the montns progress; so that it would be unjustifiable to discount her chance. > Certes three-year-olds have only proved successful on two occasions since the Caulfield Cup was institnted in 1881; Little &?/■' 63 <L\A (in ., 1882 >- and Waterfall, 7st 31b (in 18w) being the successful colts. Little Jacks victory was a kind of fluke; the grey mare Verdure should have won but for indifferent horsemanship ; hut there was no doubt as to thehollownessof Waterfall's win-lie having the field dead settled below the distance post, and romping home in advance of Trenchant and Quiver in 3m. 36J5., or threequarters of a second longer thau the record time for the i event This year Key is handicapped at 31b,above Waterfall s weight, and, with 51b sexual allowance, will meet her field on gib worse terms than Humphrey Oxenhatn's colt did But then he won with fully 71b in hand, and' i another thing, up to date in their respective seasons Key has proved herself to be two or three times 81b better than Waterfall:' And . this being so, it will be just as well to keep • Key in remembrance when she deploys into the arena on Saturday, October 16. 101 .coarse, being a racing man, you are a great believer in the efficacy of "signs and - symbols 1 ' and all the rest of it. ' And , equally' of coarse,' you recognise thai . there.is a. kind, of ." weird .mystery' about the "devil's 'number"-No.. 13 Now, then, exactly 13 years' ago this October f? ~ a six-year-old— Bouny—won the Caul field Cup, and the year; following, anothei ;. p' six-year-old—Grace Darling— in hei M footsteps, so :to speak. Since tliea no .six AS; year-old has proved successful in the greai mile and a-half handicap so that it is |usi about up to them . again. Another thing, i it likewise just about up to dear old " Blact Bui Forrester' to laid another bit'coup • And in this .connection I ,do aot think thai " cl ' iof Wing.days has stood inch a real : good chance for some years as he dees no* y.fwith the chestnut six-year-old Grains (bj ■ Goao from Industry), who is wonderfully well 2f nd » l f*KM m Caulfield Cup at 7.5. Is Mm Melbourne CupKr. F. F. Dakiaooa V- • . ■ ■ ! ' -■ :

aiders Gaulus entitled to every euade of 7.8.; it that he should be a very prominent factor overhalf-a-mile leas ground with 31b off his back. Treat has been running to well with Pegrura on his back that he ought to finish amongst the first flight in the Caulfield Cup j but although he may rua into a place, I do sot thiak he stands an " earthly" of winning •gainst such a trio as Key, Gaulus, and Foliage. The following table shows what horse has started favourite in the respective years tor the Caulfield Cup, the price at the post, and bow he fared in the race, from which it will be seen that only once in the history of the race has the absolute first favourite won:— Position Year. Favourite. Odds. at finish. ISSI .. Sardonyx „ „ itol .. Nowhere 1882 .. The Assyrian.. .. 6tol . Nowhere 1883 .. Calma 4tol .. First 18*4 .. Vergy Stol » Third /Madcap .. 10tot .. Nowhere 1883 {Velocipede .. lOtol .. Nowhere \ Prince Imperial .. lOtol .. Nowhere 1886 .. Silierraiae 4to 1 .. Second 1187 .. Volcano .. .. 4to I .. last 1888 .. The Charmer.. _ 7tol .. Nowhere 1889 .. Bravo 4tol .. Third 1190 .. Bothwell ~ „ Btol „ Nowhere 1891 .. Buiigebah ~ ~ sto 2 „ Nowhere * WK2"} - - Stol - **» 1893 ~ Jeweller .. ~ stol „ Nowhere 1894 .. Lady Trenton.. .. 6to 1 ~ Nowhere 1885 .. Hopscotch .. .. sto 1 .. Nowhere 1898 .. Hopscotch .. .. 4tol .. Nowhere THE NAPIEK PARK MEETING. The Napier Park Racing Club held their Spring Meeting on Tuesday and Wednesday last, and it appears to have passed off with a fair measure of success, albeit the totalisator investments (£9697) show a shrinkage of £585 on the amount passed through at the corresponding meeting held last year. In the big event of the first day, the Park Stakes, run over a mile and a quarter, Vedette (Sat 71b) was made a great favourite, but he cut up badly, and the places were filled by < Cesar de Lion (Jut 91b), Pompom (7st 10lb), and Douglas (7st 111b), who each ran a great race home, which resulted in a victory for Cosur de Lion by a neck from Pompom, a head only separating Douglas from the latter. The victory of Cceur de Lion in this race only tends to show that his success in the Spring < Handicap, run at Hastings in the previous ■ week, was no fluke, for he was required to ' carry 131b additional in the Park Stakes. Golden Plover (lOst 131b) and Tallyho (list 61b) were made nearly equal tavourites for ■ the Hurdle Race, but a surprise proved to be ' in store; and the winner turned up in Rhino ' (9st 71b), who defeated Golden Plover by a ' length. ' The field for the Railway Handicap J dwindled down to a miserable one of three ' contestants, Daunt (Bst 21b) being made an ' odds on favourite, and he won his race in a !

', canter. , The principal race of the second day was i the Racing Club Handicap, which event was f run over a mile and a distance, and for which 0 there was a capital field of ten, Pompom if (Bst lib), Douglas (7st 131b), and Cceur de I- Lion (Bst 41b), on the strength of the good form t they displayed on the previous day in the fighting out of the finish in tfie Park Stakes, t were the ones most in request, but the favourite division suffered a terrible rout, not one of - the number succeeding in getting into the 8 placed division, which was filled by Dare- " devil flat 111b), St. Conon flat 61b), and Primula (7st alb), who finished as named. With 61b off her back. Tally-ho (list) was i made a strong favourite for the Hurdle Race, 1 but Golden Plover, though weighted with 61b more than the impost which he carried intoseeond place on the previous day, made i small work of his opponents, and the son of fForernnuer was attended home by Troubadour (lOst), with the favourite in third place. Though weighted with the heavy impost of 9st in the Grand Stand Handicap (seven . furlongs), Vedette was made a staunch ( favourite for that race. The son of Vani. guard flattered the hopes of his admirers during the early stages of the race, but he coli lapsed in the run home, and Target flst 101b), ■ to whom he was called upon to concede a > stone and four pounds, beat him easily by a > couple of lengths. » A feature of the meeting was the number of • successes scored by the progeny of the de- ' funct Dreadnought. Cceur de Lion, Daunt, ' Daredevil, Te Hapuku, and Target, who owe their descent to the son of Chester, E each earning a winning bracket. ' AN AUSTRALIAN SUCCESS IN ENGLAND, When last year the Australian-bred horse i Merman was purchased on behalf; of an > English owner, and sent to the Old Country, | it was predicted that he would win a good | race there, in the event of hit not suffering i severely from the climatic change. This , prediction has been very amply verified, for i a cablegram to hand states that the chestnut . son of Grand Flaneur won the Cesarewitch [ Stakes at Newmarket on Wednesday last. i This race may be pronounced the greatest i handicap of the year on the English turf, , and as it is run over a course extending to two • piles, two furlongs, and twenty-three yards, i it is calculated to very severely test the ; stamina of a horse. Merman, we are told, I only won his race by a neck after a hard , fought battle with The Rush ; but as there I was a'field of twenty-two contestants behind i him, the merit attaching to the Australian ; horse's performance cannot be gainsaid. ' Though Merman could not be said to be a , champion in Australia he succeeded in winning several good races during the time he i carried the colours of the Victorian ■ sportsman Mr. W. R. Wilson; aud to this day it is the opinion in some well versed quarters that had he uot unforr tunately been left at the post in the last . Caulfield Cup contest, he would have had bis namo enrolled as the winner of that race instead of Cremorne. Be that as it may, . however, the son of Grand Flaneur subsei quently achieved a oouple of sterling i victories, that earned for him the right of . distinction as a good horse. With 9st 31b in the saddle he won the Yan Yean Stakes at , Flemington, beating a good field; and later i on under 9st 41b he scored in the Williamsj town Cup ; and the merit attaching to the ■ performance registered by the son of Grand | Flaneur in the last-named race lies in the [ fact that he presented Bloodshot (who had . previously acted as runner-uD to Newhaven . in the Melbourne Cup) with 61b, beating him > easily. i Prior to earning distinction in theCesarei witch Stakes, Merman had been seen out ; under silk in the old country. The first i occasion he was started was in a handicap , at Leicester, when he ran so badly as i to, it is said, entirely shake the confidence of those connected with him. He was, it appears, raced in the English fashiou, e,g., in plates, and it was, suggested to his trainer 1 that on the next occasion of his starting the experiment of racing him barefooted should I be tried. This advice was followed when i the horse was sent out to contest the Lewes I Handicap, with the result that he won his I race all right. The important victory gained | by Merman will be a feather in the cap of [ Mr. Allison, the well-known breeding expert, ; and contributor to the English Sportsman, > for it was entirely on his advice that the son ! of Grand Flaneur was bought. 1 The leading lines in Merman's pedigree ■ read as follows :- 1 MERMAN.

The owner of Merman, I may remark, is ' Mrs. Langtry, of beauty fame, and by the 1 success of the son of Grand Flaneur in the Cesarewitch Stakes, she is reported to have won £40,000. | SALE Of GALTEE MORE. There has of late years been plenty of evidence to show that the Continental Governments are intent on drawing largely from the thoroughbred stock of Great Britain, when such opportunity offers. An English cablegram received this week states that the Hungarian Government has purchased Galtee More for the long price of £20,000; and thus another great horse is to go to a foreign land. By winning the Two Thousand Guineas, , Derby, and St. Leger Stakes, Galtee More \ proved himself to be a great colt, and as i his pedigree fairly bristle* with the stoutest , and most fashionable blood, it would appear , aslthough the Hungarian Government had s secured in the ton of Kendal and Morgar nette a horse that can scarcely fail to be a 1 success at the stud. > ~ The long price paid for Galtee More is J pre *° cause some little discussion as to the f highest prices that have been paid for famous t thoroughbreds. My researches in that , 55 «!?' *!*** »»lted in the compilation of U'thefollowuislta!-

KMrAhoLiivStMkwsll .. ~ .. £13,125 ■tewSftSL-:: :: -S P«traKh,Wl OT ,lcmde» ' " ffim K«D<lal by Bend f: :: " :: S »^'^" 0 & ,0,^eBiVM :: *»•«•» Mribm, bj Ma.it« ißldire "L " - SS2 St. Blaise, by netmlt „••'•" " '$*■£? Meddler, by St. QaHeD. . ", . " " *M» .Carbine, by Mush* ... - "fS Common, by Isonomy .-. ■'• *:■••'••.■..■" J,?™ Galtee More, by Kendal " "- " %s** :■; In a communication to the London Sport* man, prior tojhe route of ttoDfc&uttf Alison stated that he ; made an ; offer for Galtee More which took the shape of 21000 guineas, together with 2300 guineas outoTthe Derby Stakes,'and a similar sum out of the St. Leger if he won (or 30,000 guineas in ail) That offer was, however, refused by Mr Gabbiu. the then met of the 0e1t, . , >,;,;'

; THE NEW ZEALAND CUP. r A second payment in connection with the j New Zealand Cup fell due last night, and, as , was expected would "be the cMe, this has ; brought about a large weeding ont, the field i being reduced to 21. During the past few ; days there has been a rumour afloat that all I is not well with Euroclydon, and the absence of his name from the list would have i caused no surprise; but it will be 1 seen from the list appearing elsewhere that he still remains in the race. Waiuku has been so unsteady in tbe betting for several days past that it was generally concluded there must be something wrong with the son of St. Leger, to cause the pronounced drop that took place in his case. What grounds, if any, there are for the suspicion regarding Waiuku'a soundness it will be for time to show, but the son of St. Leger being paid up for will cause his large army of backers, for a time at least, to again view his chance hopefully. With the reduction of the field, and the fact that many fancied candidates have failed to show good form, and that others are under suspicion of unsoundness, tends to improve the chances ofjthe Auckland-owned pair Daystar and St. Paul. STOP NEWS. Mr. Walters was in town yesterday, and reports the arrival of the first progeny sired by the imported Soult. Mr. Walters tells me that some of St. Simon's gets are brimful of quality and show plenty of size. As was the case last year, Soult is to be largely used this season again"at the Papakura estate. So far as the present season has advanced, 20 of Mr. Morrin's mares have produced foals at Wellington Park, the result being 12 fillies and eight colts. There are still eight mares to foal. Duenna, the dam of the A.J.C. Derby winner, Amberite, has this season visited the New Zealand-bred stallion, Fusilier, by Musket—Yatteriua. Mr. W. Walters' Cresaina, by I.eolinus-Rosariia, colt to Soult. Mr. w. waiters' Helen McGregor, by Capti»ator— Hamuli, fllly to Soult, Messrs. Nathan's Jadestoue, by Sword DancoOnyx, colt to St Hippo, Mr. D. McKinnons Dreamhnd, by CadoganSiesta, colt to Flintlock. Messrs. Alison Bros'. Pearl, by Barbarian-Don Juan mare, colt to Regol. Mr. J. iowther's Lady Antrim, filly to Seaton Delaral. MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS. Following closely on the death of Lady Anna, another of "Mr. R. Burke's" horses last week passed out. This was Bellevedere, who succumbed to an attaok of inflammation of the lungs. Bellevedere, who was a five-year-old daughter of Cuirassier and i Belle was a nice cut of a mare, and last i season she proved her ability over the small | sticks by crediting her owners with a couple I of hurdle races. It is to be hoped that the ill-fortune that has followed the North i Shore stable so persistently during the past i tew months will now take wing, and let I me also express the hope that some of the I representatives bearing the popular yellow ' and black jacket will be found in the aicen- i dant when next month we foregather at i Ellerslie. '

Advices to hand from the South, state that Mr. D. McKinnon's £w Zealand Cup candidate, Oma, is training on as well as anything at Riccarton. The ion of Flintlock did not appear to be doing well, when he first took up his quarters at E. Cutts'; but he is stated to have made a deal of improvement during the last few weeks ; and with some prospect of the field being considerably weaker both in point of numbers and quality, the Aucklander may, it is thought, have to be reckoned with. There is no horse engaged in the New Zealand Cup that has less to recommend him so far as public performances than Oma, for he has really only once faced the starter, and that was when he started in the Maiden Handicap, run at the Auckland Racing Club's Spriug Meeting last year, and in which race he finished at the tail end of the field. Mr. D. MoKinnon contends that Oma is a better horse than his cast-off Haria, and striking a line through the fact that the latter acted as runner-up to Nestor in the last Auckland Cup, his owner ou that reasoning assesses Oma's chance of annexing the New Zealand Cup as a very fair one. A statement having got abroad that Fabulist was shipped South .from the Manukau this week, with a view to fulfilling his engagement in the New Zealand Cup, caused quite a mild excitement in local circles during the past few days, for it had been stated in unequivocal language by the connections of the horse that he would not make the journey. Mr. Leonard, however, yesterday, pricked the mystery overhanging the whereabouts of fabulist by stating that the horse was still located at Mangere, and, what is more, that he had not altered his mind as to withdrawing his horse from his Southern engagements. From the list of acceptances for the New Zealand Cup, appearing in another column, it will be seen that Fabulist is amongst the absentees. In a spirit that may be described as brimful of hope, old John Chaate left for the South on Tuesday last, by the s.s. Tarawera, with bis New Zealand Cup candidate, St. Paul. The little son of St. Leger was in capital nick when he commenced his journey Biccartonwards, and everyone who delights to see a good horse that is consistently spun out successful will, I am sure, wish that John Chaafe aud St. Paul may not return without having annexed at least one of the C.J.C. cheques.

The Hon. G. McLean has suffered a serious loss by the death of his two stallions, St. Clair (by Musket— Pulchra), and Rubezahl (by See-Saw-Fairyland). Both these horses had proved their abilities to get high-class stock, and with a very sparse number of thoroughbreds in Otago their loss to the Southern province must be regarded as a rather serious one. Rubezahl, I may remark, is the ;ire of the champion sprinter Goldspur, while St. Clair had earned distinction as the sire of Lord Rosslyn, Belle Clair, Arline, and a number of lesser lights.

It would seem that Wait-a-Bit is not going to turn out the brilliant performer that was fondly expected by his large oircle of admirers. When the son of Malua had his wings clipped by Ayrshire in the September Stakes, it was by some considered that his jockey (J. Anwin) was to some extent responsible for the defeat of the horse by appareutly takiug matters a little too comfortable when nearing the winning- post, thinking all danger over. But in the Caulfield Stakes, run on Saturday last, Wait-a-Bit failed to even get near the placed division. Weight-for-age races have many times proved rather unreliable material upon which to gauge a horse's chance in handicap events, but still that Wait-a-Bit's form at Caulfield was regarded as a most inferior display we have important evidence in his having receded to 100 to 6 in the Melbourne Cup betting, after having been for several months in the position of favourite for that race.

The leg trouble that was given out as the cause of Positano's withdrawal from the Caulfield Cup appears to have quickly yielded to the treatment applied, and, with the exception of a few days, the sou of St. Simon has been in regular work ever since the conclusion of the A. J.C. Meeting. " Milroy," of the Sydney Mail, in referring to the English-bred horse, says :-Positano has settled down very quietly of late, and has given up his tricky ways on the training track. He is well behaved, looks well to the eye, and does his work solidly and well with Clarion.

At the end of last season it seemed to be a very general opinion that even if Aurum weut amiss Mr. VV, R. Wilson would still have a trio of respectable three-year-olds to draw upon in Majestic, Manfred, and Reliance. But judgiug from the wretched, character ot the form that each of that number has displayed they are an inferior lot, and it is fortunate for the St. Albans stable that Aurum has been able to stand up to the collar, for if the V.R.C. Derby contest devolved upon Majestic,' Manfred, or Reliauce, it is, taking a line through; recent form, hardly likely that Mr. Wilson would win the Derby. As was expected would be the case, Miss Emmy was brought back to Auckland with a view to contesting ihe Guineas to be decided at Ellerslie in preference to her being taken South to contest the C.J.C. Oaks, The daughter of Cuirassier looks none the worse for her trip to the East Coast ; indeed, if anything, it has improved her.

The performance registered bv Coil in connection with the Caulfield Stakes on Saturday last, which event he won under a 71b penalty, was regarded as such a brilliant exploit that the son of Abercorn was immediately raised to the position of favourite for the Melbourne Cup. With 9st 31b to carry in the great Flemington race Coil has by no means the best of the weight in that race; but still it may be argued that he is one of the few prored stayers engaged in the race. A writer in the Australasian, who recently looked over Coil, states that the son of Abercorn has not grown in height since he was seen at Flemington lost autumu, but he has thickened out a lot in the quarters, and filled out in front.- lie looks as hard as nails (says the writer),, and is in Pay ten's best condition. "Reginald," of the Sportsman, has also a good word to say for Coil, and this he does in unmistakable language as follows:—Abercorn's son is one of the best j and gamest, and flow, in the prime of his four-year-old days,' and carrying as much solid staying condition, the Melbourne Cap,' under. 9s 31b, will not assuredly prove far ] beyond him. ?'■■•'> "■'• >. '■ .••---*i i^-rih: ■»''''■■?.( The Brook, who has accomplished nothing of note since she pulled off the Maaawatu Racing Club's Handicap, last autumn, was rather < unexpectedly • found to be in \ the .winning, vein at Napier Park on Wednesday, last,,when, she finished in front for the Wharerangi Handicap, aid "■''• • dividend of i iSSresulUd. |

When the s.s. Tasmania went down at Table Cape she had on board a two-year-old thoroughbred filly by Cuirassier. It was concluded that the filly met a watery grave along with the ten draught horses that were on beard the ill-fated steamer, but it is stated thai she swam ashore and was saved. It has not been reported that Mr. Sullivan, of Pahiatua, to wham the filly was shipped by the ill-fated vessel, has got his purchase heme yet A rumour was current in the early part of the present week that a screw was loose with Blarney. This would appear to be a canard, for at the Napier Park Meeting the son of Apremont was sent out to contest'the Criterion Stakes. He ran a good race under Bst 131b, and was only beaten a head by Tirant d'fiau, after a ding-dong finish. The ex-hack Vedette met with'his first defeat on Tuesday last, when he failed in the Park Stakes. The son of Vanguard, who was weighted at&t 131b, was made a strong favourite, and there was no mistake about bis defeat, for he failed to gain even a situation.

There seems every promise of the Maribyrnong Plate this year attracting a very.large and high-class field. At the date of the first forfeits recently 36 youngster* still remained in the race, amongst which is of course Cocos, the winner of the Debutant Stakes at the V.A.T.C, Meeting on Saturday last. Mr. D. MoKinnon's Picklock, and Granite, atwo-yearoldfilly by Flintlock from Magnesia, were brought down from VVaikato by Wednesday's train. Daystar, who is reported to have gone on most satisfactorily in his training since beiug taken to Napier with his stable mates, will, with Hariaand Acone, be on bis way to Siccarton to-day. Owing to ill-health Mr. A. Austin has given instructions to Messrs. Hunter and Nolan to offer the whole of his horses by auction, particulars of which will be found set forth iu an advertisement appearing in another column. Some little,wagering has already taken place locally on the Auckland Cup, Daystar, St. Paul, and Nestor being each supported at 100 to 5.

With all the great string of racers that Mr. W. K. Wilson can command at St. Albans, he has not a single representative left in the Caulfield Cup. The Hon. George McLean's New Zealand Cup candidate Lord Resslyn, is stated tebe training on all right at Dunedin; but there is said to be a doubt us to his feet standing should the going become hard. Mr. J. Roulston has at present iu work i three year old colt by Castor from Winnie, who of course claims half brothel ship to Mr. Skipwith's champion St. Simou. The colt in question is wel) spoken of, and he will probably be seen out under silk during the present season.

11l view of the fact of Rosella having been strongly backed for this year's Caulfield Cup, the following little par which I clip from the notes of the Melbourne correspondent of the Otago Witness may prove valuable :- "A few weeks back Mr. William Lang assured me that but for meeting with an accident during the race last year Rosella was certain to have beaten Cremorne in the CaiilfieldCup." Old Cremorne has rui, it is thought, his last race, as Walter Hickenbotham found it impossible to train the great son of Glorious, and Inst year's Caulfield Cup winner has been sent home to his owner's place. Coolalta, the full brother to Coil, has been sold to go to India. Mersey, the dam of Carbine, has been buried in the little enclosure at St. Albans where Musidora, Mischief, and Brissis are taking their long rest. Rosella, who is much fancied for the Caulfield Cup, is a half-sister ,to the sensational Pigeontoe, who started such a hot favourite for the Melbourne Cup of 1891. Auraria is stated to be training »u satisfactorily. However, it is a mere matter tor conjecture whether Trenton's daughter will ever regain her true form, yet there is much to indicate that she will. Daystar is now a firm favourite for the New Zealand Cup at 7 to 1. The Auckland-owned Ditto gave his owners another wiuniug turn lust week iu Sydney by winning the Jumpers' Flat Race run at Rosehill on Saturday last. Euroclydou has been allotted 10st81bin the Spring Handicap to be run at the North Otago Meeting on Thursday next. Pegasus (by Nelson—Teuambra) was yesterday, sold by auction at Messrs, Hunter and Nolan's yards for 23 guineas.

6 SPORTING, RACING FIXTURES. (lEW ZEIUNU/ October 19,20— PoTerty Bay Turf Club October 21,North Otato Jockey Club. November 9—Kaiteratahi Club . NoVember 6,9.10-Aucklind Racing Club. _ November 9, U,a»i Jockey CllK December 27-Tatinui*» H«k Baciu .Jub. December 27, as-Northern lUaniClub. DecemWr'27,' Jockey Clubr " • • . December 27, January 1,3—Aucilana K&ciRg mat JtnWnr li 3-Hincitikei Hacrnj Club. January 1,3r-H»wke'« Bay Jockey Club. . < '. February 10, 12-Canterbury Jockey Club. Match 16,17-Hawke's Bay Jockey Club. March 23,21, 25-punedin Jockey Club. April 11, 12— Canterbury Jockey Club. April 11,12, Auckland Racing Club. June 4, 6—Auckland Racine Club. .. , . Australia. ■ October Victoria Amateur Turf Club. October 30, Novercber 2, 4,8—Victoria Racing Club ANSWERS to correspondents. .'Selector.— was got by Musket; Nelson by Kin; Cole; Vanguard by Inducer. The lastnamed was taken to Australia, but be never raced there. J. H., Waiorongomai.-According to the list as published by the Sydney Referee, there are only two black horses (Sunbury and NV-Kast) engaged in the Melbourne Cup. NOTES BY PHAETON. THE VICTORIA AMATEUR TURF GLOB'S STRING MEETING. The above club opened their Spring Meeting on Saturday last at Caulfield, and u it usually the case, the principal events claimed ft large amount of local attention. The Caulfield Stakes, which event is run over nine furlongs, at weight-for-age, with penalties attached, drew out a capital field, of which the A.J.C. Derby winner, Amberite, wasconsideied to be the one most likely to «core, and he was made favourite. However, he seems to have cut a most inglorious figure, and took no hand in the finish, which was fought out by Coil and Key, the former winning in great style by leveral lengths, As Coil had a 71b penalty in the saddle which raised his weight to the respsotable burden of 9st 71b his performance has a good deal of brilliancy about it, and it may be said to be the best that he has registered. Aurum made small work of those that opposed him in the Caulfield Guineas, and after the son of Trenton had taken up the running six furlongs from home the issue was sever in doubt. That there were some grounds for the move that 'xu made against Aurum for the Derby a fortnight back is shown to have been the case, as his near fore foot (owing evidently to its having split) had to be wax-threaded. As immediately after the Caulfield race the bookmakers stipulated odds of 3 to 1 on from would-be backers of Mr. Wilson's colt for the Derby, he would appear to have pulled up sound, albeit a cablegram states that his injured foot bled after his efforts in the Guineas. If that really is so, there is plenty of reason to stand off Aurum, for, with every prospect of the ground becoming harder as the year advances, that circumstance will be all against Aurum getting to the post at Flemington, The following is a list of winners of the Caulfield Guineas:— Yr.. Owner. Winner. Sire. Time 1881 Capt. Rossi .. Wbeatear .. Epigram .. 1 49 1882 W.Pearson Fryingpan.. B't'L Green 1 47 1883 Mr. J. Aldridge Sarditis .. Emulation 1 46 1884 Mr. W. Gordon Sandal .. Winterlakel 60 18SS Mr.J.Wilson, jr. Ringmaster First King 148 1886 Hon. W. Long Maudelina.. Neckersgat 146 1887Hon. J. White Carlyon ..Chester ..140 . 1888 Hon. J. White Volley .. Musket .. 1 48 1889Hon. J. White Rudolph .. Martini-Hyl 491 1890Mr. W. Bailey Annesley .. Neckersgatl 47* 1891 Mr W.R. Wilson Strathmore Nofenfeldt 1 441 1892Mr..I. B.Clark Autonomy .. Chester ..1451 1893 Mr. F. Purches Patron .. G. Flaneur I 46} 1894 Mr. <;. M. Lloyd Cobbity ,. Abercorn.. 1 44 1895 .Mr. W.R. Wilson Wallace ..Carbine ..1451 1893 Mr. S. G. Cook The Officer.. Crusoe 1 44* W.R. Wilson Aiinnn Trenton ..146}. Cocos, the high-priced full brother to Coil, for whom the Victorian sportsman, Mr. W. Bailey, paid 1150 guineas last autumn, proved himself to be a good colt, by securing the rich Debutant Stakes from a large field. The winner is engaged in the Maribyrnong Plate, for which be has incurred a penalty of 101b by Ms victory in the Debutant Stakes, and his impost will therefore be raised to 9st 61b. To-day the Caulfield Cup will be brought op tor decision, and with 28 horses still engaged in that race, the task of finding the winner is (still one of great 'difficulty. Ayrshire, who has been left at the top of the list, has shown himself to be suite master of weight, and under 8st 91b he should be able ts render a good account of himself. It is thought in some quarters that Ayrshire will not be able to live out to the end of a fast run mile and a half; but that is a note ot alarm that has many times been sounded only to be completely stifled when the quadruped, singled out as a non-stayer, has romped heme in front, and Ayrshire may be another to prove that he has been summed up quite wrongly. Still, there is this against Ayrshire, that he invariably hangs out, after getting over a mile, which would appear to show that he does not like a journey. The Sydney-owned Parthenopseus (7st 121b) has been responsible for some really excellent work since being transported to Victoria, and unless the parties connected with the son of Splendorare miking a grievious error, he will run a great rice for first honours. Trent (7st 101b) has been puting in some good work on the track, but the manner in which he lias run up and down in the quotations is not at all reassuring that' the Caulfield Cup will be his errand, and I cannot tor that reason ally myself with him. Key (7st 81b) is evidently a most genuine little filly; but her. diminutive size will, it is thought, tell against her in a race of this character. The little daughter of Padlock will, however, 1 think, succeed in beating more than beat her. Prior to meeting with his defeat in the Caulfield Stakes, the chance of Amberite taking a prominent hand in the Cup finish seems to be a very likely circumstance, but he has on the strength ot his indifferent display on the opening day lost caste. Still it may not be altogether safe to hastily write him out, especially as his party have him well backed. If Rosella (6st 81b) is really as good as she is held to be, then the race would appear to be a really " good thing" for the daughter of Trenton and Pardon. Under Such a weight Rosella should be able to set her opponen a very stiff task to bring about her defeat. To sum up the whole matter, it seems to me, after a patient consideration of the knotty problem attaching to the Cup, that I cannot do better than anticipate the placing of the judge thus— Rosella, ParthenopjCDS, Key. The following is a list of the horses left in the Cup st lb at lb Ayrshire .. ..8 9 St. David .. >78 Paul Pry .. .. f8 7 Suubury .. ..7 6 The Chevalier ..8 6 Amberite .. I I •Foliage .. ..8 3 'iaulus .. .. 1 4 Acton .. .. 8 2 The Grafter ..7 4 Canonna .. ..8 1 The Hypnotist ..7 3 Mischief .. ..8 1 Bmtdook .. _ 7 ! Devon .. .. 8 0 Malto .. .. 7 2 Parthennpsus .. 7 12 Birksgate .. ..7 2 Straightfire .. 711 Nor'-east .. ,.7 2 Trent . .. 710 Watercolour .70 Dreamland ..7 9 Metford .. .. 611 Bonnie Heather.. 7 9 ltosella .. ..8 8 Key 7 8 Luster' .. ..6 7

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXIV, Issue 10575, 16 October 1897

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6,987

SPORTING. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXIV, Issue 10575, 16 October 1897

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