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LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS.

A notifcation in reference to the Land Tax and Income Tax Act, appears in our •drertising columns. The land tax and further graduated land tax. leviable under the Act, is made payable in )ne sum on Tuesday, the 26th November,at the offico of the Commissioner of Taxes, Government Buildings, Wellington.

Tho usual fortnightly meting of the General Committee of the Si' George Grey Statute Fund will take place at ti-e Muni:ipsl Buildings this ovening. It is notified that collectors are requested to hand in their reports, and that all interested are invited.

The Auckland Racing Club opened their Second Spring Meeting at Ellerslie on Saturday last, which was will attended. The principal event of the programme, the Auckland Guineas, was won by Mrs. IV. Duncan's colt Fabulist, whodefeated four opponents in easy style. Tne winner was bred at Sylvia Park by Messis. Nathan, and was picked up very cheaply as a yearling for the small outlay of 25, guinea}. The meeting v. ill be ' found fully reported in another column.

The Victoria Racing Club concluded their Spring Meeting at Flemington on Saturday last. In the Spring Stakes (a race confined to three year olds) the Auck-land-owned Osculator scored a meritorious victory, defeating horse! opposed to him with ease. Osculator is a Bon of the M uskec horse Hotchkiss, and wag purchased as a yearling by Mr. D. A. McLeod for 325 guineas. An account of the meeting appears elsewhere in this issue.

In our obituary column will be found recorded the death of Mr. James Craig, of I'onsonby, in his GOtli year. The deceased was an old identity, having come over to New Zealand in the sixties from Victoria, being instrumental in bringing over the Lyster Opera Troupe, in which venture he suffered financial reverse!. He was at the West Coast, and on the outbreak of the Thames gold field was early on the scene, and for many ft long year was one of the leading men in that district, and carried on an auctioneering business as well as several important agencies. Within the last few years he removed to Auckland, and conducted the management of the Star Hotel, Albert-street, a post he held almost up to his death, Deceased has been in ill health for tin past year, his complaint being heart disease. He had recently been to Te Aroha and Rotorua, but derived no appreciable benefit. It was his intention to have visited Scotland, "here he is well connected, and his brother is secretary of the Scottish Geographical Society. Deceased leaves a widow and several stepchildren. The funeral will take place to-morrow, at the I'anmuro Roman Catholic Cemetery, Mr. Craig having expressed a desire to be buried there.

.-\n inquest was held at Pukokohe on Friday last by Mr. Jas. Latimer, J.P., on the body of Elizabeth Maud O'Connor, infant. Mr. T. G. Usher was chosen foreman of the jury. The jury viewed the body and the boiler in which the child was drowned. The boiler was a small ono, made to contain five gallons, and had an inch and a half of water in it. After taking the evidence of the parents, the jury found a verdict of "Accidental death, deceased being drowned in a boiler containing two inches of water, and that no blame was attributable to anyone."

The ether day the city authorities notified that householders by giving intimation at the municipal offices of having defective water taps could have them repaired without charge. The City Engineer says it is wonderful the number of water taps that have gone out of order since notice was given that tho Council would put in new washers without any charge, applications coming in by hundreds.

There were two persons in the lock-up last evening oil charges of drunkenness, and two, a man and it woman, on charges of being drunk and dieordorly. One wrest was made yesterday for drunkenness. It jb quite noticeablo of late the numbers of persons the worse of liquor on Sunday in the public streets, and seems to show laxity somewhere. Yesterday forenoon, as two congregations were dispersing from- Divine service, a respectable-looking young man might have been seen staggering along the pavemont meeting the worshippers. In the evening a young woman was to be seen in one of the streets in a similar condition.

With reference to the Children's Flower Show a large number of entry forms have been distributed among the schools. Prizes are being offered for hand bouquets, handbaskets, and vases exhibited by ladies, and as for these, like all exhibits by children, no entranco fee is charged, it is expected that the entries in tliL class will be numerous. At the last show there was a long list of competitors for Lady Glasgow's prizes, and her ladyship has kindly promised to award medals as prizes, and it is hoped that the increased number of competitors for these prizes will show that her kindness has been appreciated. No entrance feo is . charged for exhibition, as the competitors are children, one of the usual sources of income is not available to help the funds of the Society, which require to be' supplemented by generous individuals, who would like to encourage the love of flowers in children. For the benefit of those wishing'. to promote the objects of the Association It may be stated that a promoter's ticket be Obtained for 6s, and this entitles the purchaser to three tickets to the show, " ;« *>■.

The Auckland, Friendly Societies . Conference are just' now busily preparing for. their bi-annual demonstration and concert in the City Hall- in- aid *of their funds, Thoie who are acquainted with the objects of the Conference are fully aware of the large araounb of good' that body .is quietly bub effectively doing. The efforts of the Conference in promoting the welfare of the members, and in' alleviating distress in their midst, arts certainly deserving of high commendation.''-Various brass bands, as well as leading instrumental . and vocal musicians, are with characteristic gonerosity giving their services. The procession, which is likely bo be larger than evor, is to be augumented by a Thames contingent. The Northern Company is running an excursion on Saturday for the purpose of bringing Thames brethren and friends, His Worship tho Mayor, Brother J. J. Holland, presides at the concert, and Mr. J. D. Connolly, United States Consul, with his usual kindness will deliver an address. A man named George Boyd, of Muddy Crook, who had accidentally cat his foot with an axo, was brought to tho Hospital yesterday for treatment. His injuries were attended to by Dr. Pabsi).

Many persons in Auckland will be glad to hear of the continued advancement in the musical world of Mr. G. H. Clutsam, pianist, an old lander, who lefb here some years ago for the Mother Country to try his fortune in London. A London journal, speaking of promenado concerts, says of Mr. ClutsamThere is nothing that calls for special comment this weok except a new orchestral suite by a young New Zealand composer, G. H. Clutsam, that was performed on Wednesday evening. We must congratulate Mr. Clutsam on tho vividness of his portrayal of a carnival scene. Ho understands how to write for the different instruments, and in the scenes described as Introduction eb Procession, Dance Boh6me, Declaration d'amour, Valse-Tondresse, and Orgie et Finale, drew a picture that needed no explanation of its varying features to make it perfectly clear to musicians and amateurs alike. 'We understand that Mr. Clutsam has written considerable other music, including a symphony in D minor played ab Covenb Garden promenade concerts in 1890, quartets, pianoforte pieces, songs, and a light opera. The attendance averages very large, and undoubtedly those concerts will be continued up to the oponing of the autumn musical season.

The Christchurch Press has the following: " When some of the linrotonga natives belonging to the London Missionary Society's steamer John Williams were travelling by train from the South, four Maoris got into their carriage. The Maoris thought they had met some of their own countrymen, and could hardly believe that the strangers had come from the Islands away in the Pacific. The two races are very muoh alike in appearance and build, and strange as it may seem, tho Maoris and Rarotongnns were able to understand a little of each others' language, showing the connection—however remote—between the two." We may correct this to far by saying that the Maoris and Rarotongans can understand each other Tho connection between tho peoples is not remote, but intimate.

Our Bay of Islands correspondent writes: —" Wiremu Katene, of To Ahuahu, a leading Maori chief, died on November Ist. He was a man of considerable influence among the natives, an ex-M.H.R. for tho Northern Maori district. He was also held in high esteem by his white neighbours. As a farmer of his own large estate, which ho managed in the same manner as the pakehaa, he seemed to be almost one of them. And yet he was ever anxious to be guarding the interests of his own race."

The season for trout fishing in the Auckland acclimatisation district opens on Friday next. Licenses for the season may be obtained at the offices of the Acclimatisation Society, Museum Buildings, as notified elsewhere. Owing to the exertions of the society in stocking the rivers with trout good sport is anticipated this season.

A lecture was given on Saturday ovening in Beresford-sfcreet Congregational Church, on "Our Missionary Ships," by the Rev. J. King, which was illustrated by limelight views. There was a large attendance. Mr. Ring gave a graphic account, first of the oarly history of the London Missionary Society, and then of the ships—the Duff, tho Camden, and the three sailing ships, named John Williams down to the fourth John Williams (the handsome steamer now in port) which he was glad to show to " the owners "—the Sunday-school children, who had raised over £18,000 to,pay for her construction. Some views were also shown of the smaller vessel, John Williams, Messenger of Peace, constructed by himself. 'Portraits wero shown of Captain Cook, John Williams, and several of the leading missionaries of the Society in the South Sea Islands. Mr. King then showed views of the mission stations and educational institutions in Samoa, as well as some illustrative of the social life of the Samoans. With reference to the natives who had been attached to the missions in Tahiti and Ruahine, an impression seemed to be abroad, Mr. King said, that the labours of the missionaries would be fruitless after annexationby the French. That was not so. The French Protestant missionaries were looking after these natives, and they were true to their first faith. The lecture was throughout of a most interesting character, listened to throughout with the greatest attention. The fine series of views was greatly appreciated. A collection was taken up on behalf of the ship fund. '' There was on Saturday night a large audienco at the Opera House to witness the concluding performance of "The Mikado" by the Auckland Amateur Opera Club. Though tho production was the seventh of the season the evor-popular opera was as welcome as ever, and encores were the order of the evening. During the run an efficient orchestra, conducted by Herr Schmitt and led by Herr Ziinmermaun, rendered excellent service.

At the City Hall on Saturday night Miss Amy Vaughan's Amazons presented a very attractive holiday programme, and the house was packed upstairs and down. The selections wero new, and encored without exception. "Too Many Lovers," the concluding farce, was played amidst roars of laughter. Harry Thomas as the baby was highly amusing, and the other parts, taken by Miss Vaughan, Messrs. Pete Miller, Hewson, and Corbett, were very well played. Misses Di Levy, Ivy Roy, and Daisy Thornton all received recalls for their items. Tho old favourites, Harry Thomas and Pete Miller, scored heavily in " Ho was one of tho Light Brigade," and " Will you come down, Mrs. Flynn?" respectively. Altogether the bill was one of the best Miss Vaughan has treated her large audiences to.

The Tivoli Musical Comedy Company announco that, owing to the success of their season, they have decided to perform At the City Hall four nights this week, viz., Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. The company will bo strengthened forthwith by the inclusion of the Australian comedians, Collins and Browne, and crowded houses should result.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9974, 11 November 1895

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2,072

LOCAL AND GENERAL NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9974, 11 November 1895

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