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COUNTRY NEWS.

[from our own correspondents.] , Hamilton, Saturday, The 'commencement of laying the gas-pipe« in Hamilton will -..take place on Monday, some 25 tons of iron pipes having arrived by rail, and the remainder being expected up today. The town will be lighted by gas probably in another six weeks!

The movement for providing a presentation to be made to Mr. James Hume before leading Waikato, on his retirement from the management from the Bank of New Zealand in this district, has now been fully arranged, the chairmen of the several local bodies in the district having been communicated with and consented to act. In addition to these, some 25 in number, the following gentlemen have been placed on the committee who will receive subscriptions : —Messrs. GL M. A. Ahier, TeAwamutu; H. Clifford, \Morrinsville; J. W. Ellis, Otorohanga; K. FitzPatrick, Ngaruawahia; L. B. Hams, Huntly; J. Hodgson, To Rore ; F. Rose, Oxford ; E. C. Shepherd, Whatawhata; C. J. Storey, Rangiaohia; C. Sutton, Razlan; Thomas Wells, Cambridge; G. W. Sare, Hamilton; the latter of whom is appointed hon. treasurer. • • :

The following tenders for various road works on the YV aipa-Raglan Road have been dealt with, and the following accepted Section 2, Okete ; Johnstone Bros., £28 16s; section 3, same, £22 3s ; section 4, same, £9 17s 6d; section 5, same, 4s 6d per chain; section 1, Okete, Kendal and Rastrick, £6 Is; Raglan, section 1, Johnstone Bros., £11 14s; Raglan, section 2, same, £38 3s 6d; section 3, same, £13 19s 6d ; section 4, same, £1(5 8s ; section 5, Rendell, £5 7s 6d : section 6. Rendell, £5 193 (id ; Raglan, section 7, S. Veicoe, £10 19s; Raglan, section 8, S. Vercoe, £11 4s; section 9, Mold, £5 10s 3d section 10, Rendell, £1 15s.

The installation of Brother R. B. Peat as W.M. of Lodge Beta, Waikato, No. 12, took place on Thursday evening. In addition to a large muster of the craft from all parts of the Waikato, there were also present assist ing, Brothers Deputy G.M., Brother. Fowlds ; Brother Powley, P.S.G. W. ; Brother Cooper, P.S.G.W.; Brother Hanna, J.D.P.G.; Brother Ross, S.D.G.; and others from Huntly, YVaiuku, etc., including Brother P.G.0., Dr. Walker, and Brother the Rev. Jochin, Grand Chaplain. The following is the list of officers installed in Lodge Beta :—S.W., Brother R. W. Mears; J.W., Brother A. Swarbrick; treasurer, Brother C. J. W. Barton, P.M. (re-elected); secretary, Brother R. J. Gwynne, P.M.; Deputy-Master, Brother G. Edgecumbe, P.M., P.G.S., P.G. Purst.; D. of C., Brother W. Dey, P.M. (re-elected); S.D., Brother F. W. Browning; J.D., Brother J. W. Oldham; 1.G., Brother D. L. Smart; organist, Brother G. F. E. Edgecumbe; Stewards, Brothers W. F. Bell r and J. C. Salmon; Tyler, Brother L. Newton.

(BY TELEGRAPH —OWN CORRESPONDENT.] Paeroa, Saturday. As a result of the recent visit of Mr. Rose, Inspector of Telegraphs, Mr. E. M. Corbett, of Waitekauri, has received a telegram from the Hon. A. J. (Jadman to the effect that the extension of the telephone will be gone on with immediately, and that the question of erecting a special office will be considered. Mr. Jas, Pocock will have charge of the telephone until the Government decide upon the erection of a suitable building. Mr. VV. Potts, president of the Miners' Union, is paying his periodical visit to Ohineinuri. The Karangahake branch was interviewed, and to-night he is engaged on union business at VVaihi.

The Maori festival is about concluded, and to-morrow the East Coast natives leave for home, while King Mahuta and his followers purpose taking their departure on Monday. The Thames contingent are-going to Omahu, where it is stated a tangi is to be held over the death of two little girls which took place this morning.

MAHURANGI. At the beginning of last week our citizens were agreeably surprised by a visit from His Royal Highness the Prince of Tramps, and we are all wondering what he will be relating about us to the outer world. A few weeks ago I noticed a paragraph in the Auckland Weekly News mentioning a new vegetable denominated Choko. A few days ago Mr. W. Wedding, of the Dome Valley, directed my attention to a plant he had growing of this species. The vines were running along his fence, and the plant had also fruited; but as the plant had been planted very late in the season, the fruits were small comparatively, mostly about the size of a large breakfast cup. Mrs. Wedding says it is good to eat as a vegetable to those who like vegetable marrows. At present it is a curiosity. A short time ago the settlers of this and neighbouring districts were gathered together to take some steps to induce the Government to intervene and stamp out a cattle disease which had made its appearance at the Puhoi. In reply to resolution sent to the Agricultural Department at Wellington, the Chief Inspector writes that there appears to be no necessity for anxiety, and the Chief Inspector at Auckland also. writes that none are affected with any new disease, but simply two or three have a well-known affection of the haw of the eye. The Wellington letter also states that Mr. Gilruth, Government Veterinary, will be in Auckland in a few days, aud that he will enquire into the matter. All will be glad to hear that when Mr. Gilruth has made his inspection his diagnosis is the same as that of Mr. Clifton, ami hope it will be made public. Many of the settlers of this district learn with extreme regret that Constable Haddock has been removed from the position he has occupied in our midst for some years. During his residence he has earned the respect of the settlers generally. He interfered with no one but those who violated the law, and in leaving he takes with him the good wishes of a large number of settlers who have looked on, and consider him as one of those who endeavoured to do his duty. / Another event of the week that may be chronicled is the change of landlords at the Warkworth Hotel, which has been conducted for the last few years by Mr. F. Dibble, who now gives possession to Mr. Anderson. During the tenure of Mr. and Mrs. Dibble they have made many friends, and all will regret their departure, but they may depend on the very best wishes of the whole community for their present and future prosperity wherever they may elect to cast in.their lot.—[Own Correspondent.] NORTHERN WAIFOA. Mr. W. Holman. contractor for the erection of the new school at Aoroa, has completed his work in a workmanlike manner, and returned to town. A meeting of Arapohue householders for the election of a school committee was held in the school on Saturday afternoon. There was a fairly good attendance. Mr. H. T. Smith, who nad acted as commissioner during the previous year, reported very favourably ou the progress of the school, and stated that the cash balance was £12. The following were elected a committee:—Messrs. H. I. Smith (chairman), J. Simpkin, W. Webb, J. Young, T. Hamlyn, A. Gelston, and S. Powell.—[Own Correspondent.] WHANGAREI. The world-renowned Donald Dinnie has settled down in Whangarei. He gives weight-lifting exhibitions occasionally, and his wife teaches dancing. We have a large number of strong young fellows amongst us, but although Donald is falling into the "sere and yellow leaf," he is still too many for them.—[Own Correspondent.] KAEO. A service; of song was held in the Wesleyan Church on the Bth of June. The choral illustrations were well rendered by the company, while Miss Eden's pathetic story, " Adrift," upon which the music was based, was read in the intervals by Mr. Wetherall, the new incumbent. Considering the many difficulties Mr. F. E. Fairburn encountered, he deserves great praise for his unflagging zeal in preparing the company for the occasion. The solos were not so successfully rendered as the parts for the full company, but Miss Whitehead acquitted herself well in ''Only Remembered," and Miss Bramley merits mention for Ye Did Unto Me."—[A Correspondent.] KAITAIA. We are having very severe weather just now, which must be very trying to the mailman, for he has miles of slush to tramp through. Mr. Thompson has nearly completed his contract. A portion is blinded with clay. The stone has been laid the whole length, and the work is a credit to him. The Government have a gentleman carrying a magic lantern for native schools, for the amusement of the juvenile aboriginals, or rather aboriginal juvenile. , The fever that carried away so many native children at Ahipara sometime ago is now raging in the Awanui district. Adults are attacked, whereas at Ahipara it seemed only to attack children. It is, I think, developing into malignant typhoid.. A medical man ought to be sent to see into it before it gets too serious. The tohunyas are doing the curing at present. The cure is ducking the patient in cold water. On the 28th instant our worthy bachelors are going to give a return ball at the IVaitaia Hall to the Awanui dons, who gave one in May last.—{Own Correspondent. J

WHANANAKI. The weather of late has been chiefly from the south-west, with frequent cold showers, which keep things uncomfortable. _ , Winter baconmaking has commenced with this cold spell. " . At the last meeting of the school committee applications for # the position of sewing mistress were considered, . with the result that Mrs. Robert Murray received the appointment. The chairman announced the resignation of Mr. W. Lott. secretary of, the committee, and Mr. F. W. Macken was elected to that position. The latest sailings for Auckland are Scows P.uakaka and Waipu with kauri logs, and cutter Lily with firewood. Mr. Body s cutter Oriwa had a successful maiden trip. I hear she proved herself a fast sailer, and remarkably stiff for her build. A football club has been formed here by Mr. T. Boyle, 'with prospects of success. / Last Saturday the members cleared a practice ground in a paddock which Mr. J. Grassick lias kindly lent for the purpose. It is proposed to use part of, the Public Reserve on the south side of the Inlet as a match ground, for which it is admirably suited. The County Council, in its list of works for which Government grants are asked, have included £100 for the Otonga East-Whana-naki Road. An endeavour is also being made to obtain a vote for the OpuawhangaWhananaki Road, to be expended, on its lower stage, from Foote's old mill to the settlement, so as to render it passable for wheel traffic.—[Own Correspondent]

MANGONUI. After a stoppage of eighteen months the Kauri Timber Company's Mill has again started, for how long no one knows. Mr. Spencer and Co. has got the cutting by contract. Captain Williams had a very uncomfortable trip trying to bring the company's p.s. Yankee Doodle around from Whangaroa to here. After getting nearly into Mangonui harbour the pump carried away, which necessitated him to drop anchor in Waimahana Bay, whence he sent a man overland to Mangonui for assistance. Eventually the steamer was towed into "Mangonui by the Staffa. The steamer, after being repaired, will be engaged in hauling logs off the mud banks and towing/rafts up to the mill. It is to be hoped that the new general manager will keep the mill going.—[Own Correspondent.] • .

BROOKLYN. On June 2 we were again privileged with a visit from tha Rev. Mr. Haselden, who held service in the schoolroom. Unfortunately, the day turned out wet, and consequently the attendance was very small. I hope when we again have the pleasure of a visit from Mr. Haselden he will have a much larger audience to address. Our school was reopened on Monday after three weeks' holidays, owing to the teacher, Miss Newbegin, having unfortunately sprained her ankle. Since her return Miss Newbegin has '■ inaugurated a " Band of Mercy" amoug the young folks. Each boy and girl on joining gets a card, and makes a pledge to be kind to all dumb animals, and protect them from harm as far as they can. On June 7, at the invitation of Mr. Marshall Laing, a number of friends met for a dance in the schoolroom. It was an enjoyable party. We are specially indebted to Mr. McGee (Titirangi), who came a long way through mud and mire, and acted most efficiently as M.C. during the evening; also, to 'Mr. Lockwood (Coriiwatlis), who supplied the music. Refreshments were handed round during the interval; and songs were sung by Miss Boult (Titirangi) and Messrs. McKeown and W. Thomson (Brooklyn), and Mr. Anderson (Cornwallis). Dancing was kept up with great spirit til), daylight.—-[Own Correspondent.]

VICTORIA VALLEY. To all appearance we not only are going to have an early winter but also a' very severe one. For the last twenty years I have not felt the weather so cold. There were seven or eight smart frosts during the monch of May, a most unusual occurrence in this mild and temperate climate, and it rained almost every alternate day, so that our roads are in a worse state than they were at the end of last winter. The road works are all stopped. The settlers are all preparing for bush-falling. There are some large areas to come down this season, as flocks arc increasing so must the pasture. The Government are cutting up 4740 acres of good grass land in this district, so that there will be a chance for several new homesteads, particularly when the Victoria to Peria Road is completed, which, we hope, will be done this incoming spring. This district has been greatly neglected in the past in the way of roads. Now this road from Victoria to Peria will not only open up the 4740 acres, it will also open up a kauri-bush containing between eighteen and twenty million feet of really splendid timber that cannot be got out by any other means. The same road will also give all the settlers in the valley an outlet to Mangonui, a consummation devoutly to be wished for, as we would then have a good road tb market; not that Mangonui is a good market, but it is a good port with a weekly steamer. The cost of constructing this road fourteen feet wide would not exceed £900—a very low price for so much happiuess to so many struggling settlers—men who would not accept of charitable aid under any pretence whatever, nor would they trouble the Government for employment, men with backbone, men who are not afraid to do a fair day's work for a fair day's wages. The number of ratepayers interested in this road is about forty. There has been a considerable amount of roadmaking done in this county this season— over two miles of gravel, also a good deal of earthworks and bridge repairs. The chairman of the County Council has been most indefatigable in his exertion to see the works carried out according to plans and specifications. In fact, I don't know any other man in the county who would go to the same trouble and expense that he does. True, he is our representative.—(Own Correspondent.]

WHAREORA. At a meeting of the Auckland Acclimatisation Society lately the secretary stated that the game licenses taken out up to date realised about £430. Considering that country settlers and farmers are the people who have to feed the society's game, and are considerable losers of potatoes, peas, maize, beans, carrots, parsnips, etc., it would only be acting " British" it the society handed over the half of the license fees to country Road Boards for the benefit of the roads. On June 16 the Christian Endeavour Society held a meeting in the church, which was conducted by Mr. Gaulter, the musical portion by Miss Simpson. The discourse was taken from St. John v., "Search the Scriptures." The " Board" attached to the Loans to Settlers Office is certainly no friend to County Councils, as several protests have been lodged against the new county valuation, simply because the Government has obtained valuation fees for making their own valuation. The following is a sample:— settler was rated at £150, and applied for a loan of £50 for the purpose of fencing, and was told his security was not good enough. Yet the Government promise to lend half the value.—[Own Correspondent.] MASTERTON. The town has been well supplied with amusements of late, fire brigade, volunteer, and football socials following in quick succession. The Wesleyan and Anglican Churches holdweekly evening entertainments. The Masonic body held their annual ball the other evening, and the hospital ball is down for next week. The Wairarapa J.C. held a very successful meeting last week at Clareville. The day being fine, the attendance was good, and the seven events on the card well competed for. Several spills occurred durine the hurdle and steeplechase races, but no serious injury happened to any rider. The popular huntsman and horse-owner won three events, two with the Tim WhifHer mare, Laiteoro, and one with Silent Friend, by the Mute. The Pahiatua sportsmen have succeeded in arranging for the hounds to visit their district, and have fixed a day for the meet.— [Own Correspondent.] OPUNAKE (TARANAKI). Mrs. Kennedy, of Kennedy's Hotel, has just returned from a trip up to your city. We have just had another Road Board election to fall one seat. There were three aspirants, viz., W. J. Dew, Edwin R. Morgan, and A. Lawn. The result was that Mr. Morgan was again left out, while Mr. Lawn, a new aspirant, kept him company, Mr. Dew being elected, as was prognosticated. Great numbers of Maoris passed through on the 16th en route to Parihaka, including a full band. The Crown Dairy Factory are offering 2sd per 111b of milk next season of eight months, with a prospect, if the butter rises in the market, they will give the suppliers a rise also. We have a Mr. Harding- settled as chemist, who is a Justice of the Peace. That gives us ten justices in this riding of the 'aranaki County.[Own Correspondent.]

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COUNTRY NEWS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9860, 1 July 1895

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COUNTRY NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9860, 1 July 1895

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