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NOTES AND COMMENTS.

A fhw days ago we noticed with gratification the information from London of a substantial increase in the price of wool. Since then, the cable messages have been encouraging, for although there has been no further specified advance, ib is shown that prices have been maintained, and that the bidding is keen." The news is encouraging in every way, and we may reasonably expect any day to hear of a further advance.

Our correspondent at Rarotonga informs U9 that the Queen of Raiatea has come to Rarotonga "to see the British Resident, and ask for a British protectorate over her islands." Mr. Moss, however, declined to Bee her officially, bat told her, unofficially, and truly enough, that there .was nob the least chance of her request being complied with. The French assumed control of Raiatea several years since, and we do nob wank a complication with them. The French and the natives of Raiatea do not seem bo get on well together, bub ib is impossible for us to interfere. A very serious misunderstanding arose between Great Britain and Germany on account of some rash and foolish talk in the House of Representatives aboub Ministers making a trip to Samoa, and France would be exceedingly aggrieved if the smallest encouragement had been given to the Queen of Raiatea. In , Rarotonga everything is proceeding quietly. We have before noticed the establishment of a newspaper called "Te Torea," printed by a cyclostyle, and which is issued every week. In the last number, that of March 16, ib is announced thab the reception given to "Te Torea" has been so encouraging thab arrangements have been made to get the requisite printing plant by the next steamer. "Te Torea" will be, ib is claimed, " a perfectly free and independent newspaper."

Some interesting particulars are to hand concerning the origin of the freetrade treaty which has juab been concluded between Canada and the Cape. It appears thab on the day before Sir John Thompson's sadden death Mr. Rhodes, being introduced for the first time to the late Canadian Premier, expressed his desire to accomplish some immediate result from the sentiment stirred in both colonies by the circumstances of the Conference ab Ottawa, and proposed there and then to draft the form of a treaty by which Canada and the Cape should give each other the privileges of free trade in certain commodities. Two British colonies freetrading with one another, would, he urged, present a definite advance in the direction of Imperial unity, and so fully persuaded was he of the mutual advantage to be gained by the two colonies, that ,he declared himself ready for his part to sign a treaty before he left the room. Such prompt measures did nob commend themselves to Sir John Thompson, and his death the following day -postponed the negotiations; but they were soon afterwards resumed, and brought to a successful issue, as recently announced by cable.

The revived Olympian games which are to be held at Athenii in the spring of next year will be watched with considerable interest throughout the civilised world if only for the splendid historical associations of the name and place. Truly, as the Times has pointed out), to secure the " name and goodwill" of the great games of antiquity was most sagacious ; but the stewards are approaching their task as practical men and! not as archaeologists. "The conscientious savant might object that the Olympian Games were held at Elis, and not at Athens, that they did not include boat and yachb races, and that the games of 185J6 ought rather to be called PanAthenaic. To this infidelity we must steel ourselves, and even to others more painful."

What, the great London journal asks, " will the savant Bay when the Olympian Games nome to be held in Paris or in London ? What does he think of the omission from the Olympian programme of boxing, of wrestling, of chariot and horse racing, and of the race in heavy marching order? What does he say to the programme actually promised by the Olympic Committee— running, quoit • throwing, gymnastics, cycling, lawn tennis, rowing, and sailing ? It is satisfactory to find that the new Olympic Games will be strictly limited to amateurs. But will the modern amateur leave his work and incur the cost of a journey to Athens to win a crown of wild olives t Feraaps not, although Uai-

versity ranks' and jumpers desire no'' prouder reward than their "blue," , The Olympic CofmUfcee will probably find it ' necessary toj provide substantial trophies such as the hart of the latter-day amateur loves. EvWWifch gold and silver trophies awaiting himab Athena there is a 1 danger that the averse athlete will not be able bo undertake the journey out of own resources. Thwurden of sending him will fall upon his tjlow-clubmen or his countrymen, who, ifttoay be confidently hoped, will be proud |)d eager to bear ill." II the ndw Olympiatfgames of 1896 are to glow with but a fait reflection of the glories of the ancient osf»s, it would almost be ft pity if New Zealand, whose athletes in some departments h#e shown themselves to be opponents noj'bo be despised by the representatives of/any country in the world, should have io part or lot in this unique gathering. j '

The deathis announced of Admiral Lord Clarence EtWard Paget, K.C.8., at the advanced aje of 84, and after an extended career both as a politician and a naval commander' He was born in 1811, and entered tba navy at an early age. He saw active sertice in the Baltic during the Crimean far. In 1859, in Lord Palmerton's aeccad administration, he was appointed Secretary to the Admiralty, retiring in 18|6 in order to take command of the Mediterranean Squadron. Previous to assuming ihis position he was returned to Parliament as one of the members in the Liberal intelest for Sandwich. In 1869 he retired fronj the command of the Mediterranean flaet.

The situation in Egypt is assuming a critical condition. The London Times anticipates a crias at any moment. Li Hung Chang has had a narrow escape of his life, A Japanese, lal away by an impulsive feeling of misappljad patriotism as the phrae goes, sndeavotted to cut short the existence of the Chiioss ambassador, but happily his attempt proved unsuccessful. America and Great Brjtain are arranging a new treaty respecting the Behring Sea. The Indian Goven>ment are -sending reinforcements to Chitral. Mr. Ward is anxious to address this members of the House of Commons who are in favour of what is called Samoan Federation. John L. Sullivan, the wel|known American pugilist, is dead. Tjie cause of death is said to have beek heart disease. The London Times ■ predicts that a dissolution of Parliament in imminent. It declares that the Cabinet is at sixes and sevens. According to fie London Daily News, which is the Government organ, the Ministry will support the candidature of Mr. L. Courtney for the Speakership of the House of Commons.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18950326.2.13

Bibliographic details

NOTES AND COMMENTS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9777, 26 March 1895

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1,170

NOTES AND COMMENTS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 9777, 26 March 1895

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