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THE KAIMAI TRACK.

PUBLIC MEETING AT CAMBRIDGE. [FROM OUR OWN CORRESPONDENT.] Cambridge. Tuesday. An influential meeting of residents of Cambtidge and neighbourhood, convened by the Mayor, was held in the Public Hall last night, Mr. J. S. Bond, Mayor of Cambridge, presided. Amongst those present were: Messrs. S. Seddon (Piako County Council), T. Wells, H. Carr, Serjeant, McCullough, Souter, E3COtt, H. Kirkwood, etc. Letters were read from the Mayor of Hamilton and others apologising for their non-attendance, on account of business and other reasons. The advertisement calling the meeting for the purpose of taking steps to get the Tauranga-Cambridge Road by way of Kaimai was read. The first resolution was moved by the Mayor, "That the Government be requested to open the road from Tauranga to Cambridge." He enumerated the advantages of this line of road being opened, the interchange of stock, the opening of the railway to the Tauranga people, also as a pleasant watering-place for the inhabitants of Waikato. The matter has been agitated for years, but from various causes first one line aud then another was agitated for, with the result that there were no less than three tracks opened, but none of the three more than a mere cattle track. He pointed out on a diagram exhibited the relative merits of the Kaimai and Thompson's track. That by Kaimai brought Tauranga within 50 miles of Camhridge, while by Thompson's track to Te Aroha the distance would be 70 miles. He thought it was the work of the Government not of the counties to do this work. It was a colonial work, connecting two important districts. The Tauranga people were unanimous in favour of the' Kaimai line. The Piako, Waikato, and Waipa County Councils were in favour of it also. The Te Aroha-Lichtield Road would strike the .road advocated. He proposed "That that portion of the Tauranga-Cam-bridge Road, known as the Kaimai track, be at once formed, so as to complete the road between Cambridge and Tauranga." Mr. T. Wells seconded and apologised for the absence of Mr. G. E. Clark, who had asked him to repeat for him the remarks < made by Mr. Clark at the Farmers' Club, that a man might trot all the way in his buggy along this road when made. Mr. Wells drew attention to the fact that Tauranga and the East Coast settlements had received no benefit from the £14,000,000 expended on railways, and it was little enough that the Government should expend a couple of thousands in connecting them with a railway system. The motion was carried unanimously. Mr. T. G. Sandes, of Hamilton, said, as an engineer and surveyor, he had given great attention to the rival routes. The necessity of a road connecting the East Coast with Waikato was generally admitted. He pointed out that the route was looked on for a long time from the T&uranga-Te Aroha point of view, not as now from the Tauranga-Waikato point of view. Part of Thompson's track traverses private property, which would open the question of compensation, a fact which has been kept in the background. There was not a grade of under 1 in 20 in any part of the track. The Kaimai track was the best bush track he had met with. Only two bridges were needed, one of which he had estimated for the Piako Creek, to cost £280, the other £200. One other bridge would cost £50 or £60. The cost of making either track would be about the same. He thought either could be made for £3000. The principal traffic from Waikato would be stock to Tauranga and settlements south of Tauranga. It would take from one to two days longer driving cattle from Waikato to the East Coast by way of Te Aroha. Mr. Souter proposed, "That a petition be forwarded to the Premier asking his Government to carry out the formation of the Kaimai track at once." He thought that a good colonial work like this was a legitimate way of finding work for the unemployed.The following petition was then read and adopted:—

l. That it is ?ery necessary in order to develope the resources of the Country, that the Waikato and Bay of »'lenty Districts should be connected by a road suitable for wheeled traffic and driving sheep and cattle. The distance from Cambridge to Tauranga is 60 miles, and of this 38 miles of road good for wheeled traffic, with substantial bridges i already made, tiz, 14 miles on the Tauranga side,

and 24 miles on the Cambridge side.-The inter raning portion of 12 miles is. known as the Raima! - track, and the making of this is the purpose of this petition. There are no engineering difficulties and the grade will be easy.- .2. That the Cambridge- 7 Tauranga road via the Kaimai track is the shortest I and roost direct route between the districts of I AVaakato and TAurangn,. an.l that the opening of I this mad for. wheeled traffic would confer subManual benefits to the >Vaikfttb and Bay of Plenty di-tricts, and result in a large-interchange of cattle, sheep, and horses, establish commercial relationships, and open up Crown and other suitable lands for settlement in the extensive district between Tauranjra. and the Thames Valley. The opening of this road would -? 180 be the m*ans of largely augmenting the railway revenue-, as- it would bring Tauranga within a day's journey of Auckland by coach and rail, connecting with the' Auckland railway at Mangawhara, on the Rotorua line, 32 miles „»°JSiJ an - r,n! it-- Ih strong objection hitherto urged against this road-viz., the expense involved in clearing the bash-is now partly done away with, the Thames \ alley Land Company having lelled the bush on both side* of the track to the Piako County boundary, more than one-third of the entire distance. It is roughly estimated that the work of format can he done at the outside for £2 per chain, hence it is believed that a sum of £250 • will open the track from nd to end for wheeled traffic Cambridge. Oliaupo and Hamilton are the established stock markets for Waik. to and Waipa, and dealers and d.-overs from the Tauranga side, by using the Kaiuiai track, as against present route via Waihi, would save 65 miles of 'veiling. 3. That there are a number of good labouring men out of employment in (he district, and the immediate starting of the work would prove a great boon to many. Your petitioners therefore pray that your Government will take the foregoing statement into your favourable consideration, and cau-B the construction of the remaining unformed portion of the Cambridge-Taurauga Road through the bush to be immediately proceeded with. Mr. Escott seconded. This motion was carried unanimously. Mr. Sarjeant moved, and Mr. Davies seconded, "That the resolutions passed be forwarded by telegraph to the Hon. the Premier, and also to the Waikato delegates now attending the Agricultural Conference at Wellington." Carried unanimously. Mr. T. Wells, in proposing a vote of thanks to the Mayor, said he would go a step further, and thank him in the name of the people of Cambridge, for the manner in which he had identified himself with this movement and advanced the cause. Mr. Bond suitably replied, and the petition was signed by nearly all those attending the meeting. _^__^_____^

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18940530.2.80

Bibliographic details

THE KAIMAI TRACK., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXI, Issue 9524, 30 May 1894

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1,219

THE KAIMAI TRACK. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXXI, Issue 9524, 30 May 1894

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