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OBITUARY.

DEATH OF THE PREMIER. Wellington, April 27. The Hon. John Ballance, Premier, died ab his residence, Tinakori Road, ab nineteen minutes pasb six o'clock this evening, aged 54 years and one month. During the latter part of last session Mr. Ballanco became indisposed, suffering from an internal complaint, and ho had been in indifferent health since. Recently he visited Wanganui, and the trip was reported to have have had a beneficial effect, bub on his return here the old complaint re-appeared, and he had several relapses. A fortnight ago he was sufficiently well to make a trip round the harbour in the Government launch, Ellen Ballance, but a day or two later he had a severe relapse, and on Saturday, April 22, the intestinal obstruction having become more acute and all other means having been tried without succobs, ib was absolutely necessary to afford the patient relief by an operation. Tho operation was successfully performed on April 23 by Drs. Cleghorn, Henry, and Fell, and Mr. Ballance felt immediate relief. Since April 22, however, Mr. Ballance had been unable to partake of any food, and on April 26 champagne was injected and gave temporary relief. The patient's weakened constitution gave the utmost anxiety to his friends, and this morning a decided change for the worse took placo, and ab a quarter to five his medical advisors gave up all hope, and intimated that the end was not far off. During the afternoon Mr. Ballanco became unconscious, and remained so till death intervened. Amongst thoso around tho deathbed were Mrs. Ballance, two of her sisters, and her brother; Sir Robert Stout, Sir Patrick Buckley, Hons. Cadmon,. Seddon, Reeves, and McKenzie, and Drs. Henry, Cleghorn, and Foil, and Mr. A. Smith, private secretary. The following is a copy of the Gazette issued by the Colonial Secretary :—" lb is with deep regret I have to announce that tho Hon. Mr. Ballance died this evening, ab tho Premier's residence, Tinakori Road, at twenty minutes past six. Tho officers at Government Buildings are relieved from duty on Friday and Saturday." Drs. Fookes and Grace examined the body of Mr. Ballance after death, and fouud a stricture in the course of the bowels, which could nob help proving fatal. There was no tumour in the stomach or bowels. „ _ . Tho late Premier was twice married. He leaves no children of his own, bub had adopted ono of bis nieces. His life was insured for £1000 in the Government office. Concerning the operation on April 23, the Post says :— " A room had been specially prepared, everything being saturated with carbolic antiseptics. Dr. Cleghorn was to perform tho operation, Dr. Fell assisting him, and Dr3. Macgregor and Mackenzie wero there with Dr. Henry. When tho summons came, the Premier, casting off In an extraordinary maimer the depression and weakness which the suspense had produced, sprang oub of bod, and walking unassisted to tho operating-room, shook hands cordially with the medical men, said good-bye to all, stepped on to tho operating table, and throwing himself upon his back, bade tho operators begin. Ib was a wonderful example of physical courage triumphing over physical weakness. Chloroform was administered, and for about two hours and a-half the operation proceeded. Ib was still incomplete when ib was felt ib would nob be safe io continue longer, and the patient was brought back to semi-consciousness. During all this time his' relations, Sir Robert Stout, and his colleagues had been waiting, fearing the worst as moments wenb by. Next morning Mr. Ballanco was partially conscious, and was able to speak hopefully of the ultimate success of his operation to his brother-in-law (Mr. Anderson) and Sir Robert Stout; and on further consultation that evening, ib was decided that the operation might be resumed on Tuesday morning, April 25. Once more that anxious group of Ministers and friends gathered at tho Premier's residence, and once more the poor sufferer, who had been kepb more or less under tho influence of opiates, was laid upon the operating board and placed under the knife. At eight a.m. the operation was resumed, and by eloven ib was-suc-cessfully completed — the old adhesions removed, the obstructions overcome, the gaping wounds sewn up, and a syphon inserted. As the sequel proved, vitality was too-exhausted to bear up under the strain, and the knife of the surgeon was applied all too late."

A BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH. I Tho Hon. John Ballance, M.H.R. for Wanganui, and Premier of New Zealand, was born at the little town of Glenavy, in tho County of Antrim, Ireland, nob far from the shores of Lough Neagh on March 27, 1839. His father, Mr. Samuel Ballance, was a tenant farmer on Lord Hertford's estate. HIS EARLY LIFE. Mr. Ballance received his early education at the Irish National Schools, and when 14 lefb his father's farm to be apprenticed to an ironmonger. After serving is apprenticeship ho went to Birmingham whero he became a commercial traveller, before he had attained his majority. While there ho attended the classes in tho Midland Institute, devoting greab attention to the study of history, biography, and modern politics. Ho was for some time secretary of the Birmingham Literary Society, and contributed largely to the press. EMIGRATES TO NEW ZEALAND. Early in 1866 Mr. Ballance determined to emigrate to New Zealand, and arrived in Wellington in August of that year. He was undecided whether to go into sheep farming in the Wanganui district or business, but ab lasb decided in favour of the latter, and on the advice of friends he settled ab Wangauui, and opened a jeweller's shop on Taupo Quay, in the latter end of the year. HE BECOMES A JOURNALIST. Mr. Ballance's natural benb being toward a journalistic career, he soon gave up his business, and started an evening daily Eaper, the Wanganui Herald, of which ho ecame proprietor and editor, and the -controlling ana guiding spirit. In 1868 the famous guerilla chief Titokowaru took the field, and war broke oub on the West Coast of the North Island. Naturally enough, there was grave anxiety among the Wanganui settlers. A meeting was held of which Mr. Ballance was chairman, and ib was upon his motion thab the Wanganui Cavalry Corps was formed, Mr. Ballance joining as a private. The troop wenb to the front, and Mr, Ballance was presenb -the first fight at Nukumaru. After this engagement) Be was , promoted. to corporal,

and shortly afterwards as corporal of the guard escorted Colonel Whitmore to the front, where that officer was to take corncommand. Mr.. Ballanco was soon after this elected cornet by his corps, and took an active part in the movements along the coasb editing his paper from the front, a work necessarily very severe and difficult of successful accomplishment. His doing bo lead to his being the centre of a controversy, which influenced in. a marked manner his career. He had acted as " war correspondent," and incurred the displeasure of the powers that were. His commission was cancelled, owing to the publication of an article in the Herald in which the way the Government wero conducting the war was somewhat severely criticised. Neither a court martial nor any other official inquiry was held, the commission being simply cancelled solely on the assumption that Mr. Ballance was tho author of tho article in question. - KNTRY INTO POLITICAL LIFE. His position as editor of the Herald, and his keen interesb in public affairs, brought him into still greater prominence, and in 1872 he plunged into politics, standing as a candidate for Egmont against Major Atkinson and Mr. W. S. Moorhouse. Major Atkinson and Mr. Ballance were both standing in the Stafford interesb, bub Mr. Ballance soon retired in favour of " the Major," who was elected, and in a public address . thanked Mr. Ballance for retiring in his interest, and predicted for him a successful public career later on. Three (years afterwards Sir William (then Mr.) Fox retired from the representation of Wanganui, and Mr. Ballance contested the vacancy, defeating Mr. Watt and Mr. W. Hutchison by a small majority, on the Abolition of Provinces ticket. It is remarkable that in this his first session he comes into conflict with the Legislative Council. He introduced a Bill to enable municipalities to raise loans by a vote of the ratepayers on the security of a special rate, without the necessity of any further Parliamentary legislation. This Bill passed the House of Representatives, but was rejected by tho Council by a small majority. In the next session the principle of this Bill was embodied in the Municipal Corporations Bill, which was introduced by Sir Julius Vogel. Sir Julius, in moving tho second reading of the Municipal Corporations Bill, acknowledged the assistance which had been rendered by Mr. Ballance in framing the Bill. Ab the general election in 1876 Mr. Ballance defeated Mr. James Bull for the Rangitikei by a large majority. In 1877 he moved an amendment to the Native Land Courb Bill, and the Bill was then withdrawn.by the Government. Throughout < hat session ho supported the Grey party in the House of Representatives. HE BECOMES A CABINET MINISTER. In 1878 Mr. Ballancebccame Colonial Treasurer in the Grey Administration, but retirednpon thoground of apersonal misunderstanding with George Grey. In 1879 there was a dissolution ami a general election. Mr. Ballanco stood for Wanganui, being returned with Mr. John Bryce, Mr. Fox being defeated. In 1880-81 Mr. Ballanco. took a prominent part in opposing the Whitaker-Hall Government. Ho was defeated for Wanganui in 18S1 by Mr. W. H. Watt, by a.majority of four. At the next general election in 1884 ho was elected, by a large majority over Messrs. Watt and a eorge Hutchison. Tho StoutMinistry now being formed, Mr. Ballance joined the Government as Native Minister, bub they were nob long in office. On their returning to power later on, Mr. Ballance took the combined positions of Minister of Defence and Native Affairs and Minister of Lands. In the latter capacity he established the village special settlements, while as Native Minister tho prominent feature of his policy was the employment of the civil forces instead of the military in order to enforce law and order among the natives. After the general election of 1887 Mr. Ballance defeated Mr. Gilbert Carson. Sir Robert Stout having been defeated tho Ministry resigned, and Major Atkinson came into office, Mr. Ballanco becoming one of the leaders of the Opposition. When the general election of 1891 took place Mr. Ballanco was again returned for Wanganui by a small majority over Mr. Carson. Tho elections went against tho Atkinson administration, and Sir Harry Atkinson resigning, Mr. Ballanco was sent for by His .Excellency the Governor, and the present Ministry was formed. POLITICAL MEASURES ASSOCIATED WITH HIS NAME With respect to the measures in connection with which his name is specially asso ciated, the Village Settlement Scheme of the Stout-Vogel Government, deserves the most prominent place. Ib furnishes the key to his general course of political endeavour. Aba somewhat earlier period ho was associated with another proposal to extend popular influence. Mr. Ballanco proposed a scheme for returning to the local bodies one-: of the land revenue derivod from deferred payments. This proposal he introduced in a Bill in 1887. He introduced a land tax in 1878 when a. member of the Grey administration. This was passed, bub subsequently repealed. He was particularly successful in his native .policy. In 1878 ho announced his intentionof introducing a measuro to confer the franchise upon a purely residential qualification, manhood suffrage, in fact. As Defence Minister in 1884, tho moment he heard of the Russian war scare he sent a singlo order to London for £100,000 of war material. In tho discussion which ensued as to tho claim made by Great Britain for a specific sum tor the protection of each colony, Mr. Ballance occupied the foremost place. Ho -contended that) the protection of English commerce was as much involved in the question as the protection of the colonies. The result was that the claim was reduced from something liko £50,000 to £23,000 as an annual contribution from New Zealand. Under Mr* Ballance as Defence Minister the fortifications wero commenced and carried to an advanced stage. Under him also the permanent militia was organised. Ho was opposed to the federation of New Zealand with the other colonies upon the ground that the condition of New Zealand was wholly dissimilar, and federation with Australia would destroy her autonomy. As a man Mr. Ballanco was kind and genial. He assumed no superiority, but at tho same time was frank and outspoken. Mr. Ballanco leaves no family. Throughout his political career Mrs. Ballance has been his able coadjutor, and during his long illness his devoted nurse.

THE FUNERAL.— IMPRESSIVE CEREMONY. [BY TELEGRAM.—FROM our SPECIAL CORRESPONDENT.] , Wanganui, April 30. Never in the history of Wellington was thore such an assemblage as meb "this morning to pay the last respect -to' the memory of the late Premier. The morning broke fair, -after a fortnight's dreadful weather. Ab 6.30 the naval detachment from H.M.s. Katoomba, the Wellington Navals, the Petone Navals, the Wellington Guards, the Wellington City Rifles, detachments from up-country, including a small detachment of the Heretaunga Cavalry, drew up at the bottom of Hill-street, opposite the late Premier's official residence. Carriages containing Ministers had already entered the grounds. The whole of Hill-streob, Molesworthstreet, and Sydney-street), through which the funeral cortege was to pass, was lined with spectators two and three deep. For 100 yards on either side of the entrance gate to the official residence was a large concourse of people of both sexes, and of all classes. The grounds were filled with members of the House of Representatives, friends, officers of the several departments, and others having invitations. The Southern members, with Speaker •Steward, were in greab force. The demeanor of the crowd wasrfitting to the occasion. The general silence lent an additional air of solemnity to the occasion. Shortly before seven, the Governor's carriage, containing »bis aides-de-camp and private Secretary, drove up and entered the grounds. They were received by the Ministers, the Hon. R. J. Seddon, the Hon. Sir P. Buckley, the Hon. Mr. Cadman, the Hon. Mr. McKenzie, and the HoiwMr. Carroll,whoactcdaa-chief jnoiurnesa.. r

Excellency's carriage was followed by a great number of carriages, containing friends of the deceased and members of the various public branches. At a quarter-past seven o'clock a start was made. • The Naval and Military Corps fell into the order of march, and proceeded along Hill-street in fronb of tho spectators, The Permanent Force, with arms reversed, headed the procession ; then followed detachments of the local corps. The time occupied in passing from the residence to the railway station was a little more than half an hour. The Garrison Band played the "Dead March" in "Saul" from the house to the railway station, where the train was in readiness. A crowd followed in the wake of the funeral cortege from the residence; in fronb of the station there was a dense mass of people. Some time was occupied in carrying tho body from the gun >jarriago to the place assigned to it on the train. The coffin was covered with very magnificent wreaths, the prevailing colour being that of white chrysanthemums. As the train moved off from the Thorndon Station, the concourse of spectators took up a position by the fences along the line. The windows of the opposite houses were full of ladies. The men and boys stood uncovered as the train passed alongside of Thorndon Quay. ■Wellington was soon left in the distance as the train spud on its melancholy journey. There were few incidents worth noting on the journey from Wellington to Wanganui. The body had been placed in a special carriage forward, the carriage in front being occupied by Ministers, the medical attendants of the deceased, Mrs. Ballance, Lady Buckley, relatives of the family, and friends. The representatives of the Governor occupied a carriage next to the Ministers. There were some thirteen carriages altogether attached to the train. The rest wero occupied by persons of all classes having invitations from Cabinet Ministers. At Otaki there was a touching episode. Tho Maoris of the neighbourhood, to the number of about 100, headed by their band, mob the train, the band playing the "Dead Match" in "Saul" with excellent effect. Here the; train stopped ten minutes. The tribute paid by the Maoris to the memory of a formor Native Minister started tears in the eyes of many. Several of the natives were on horseback. The train started again, the mournful wail of the " Dead March" being still heard for a considerable distance. The remainder of the journey was accomplished without anything of importance occurring. At the settlements along the line groups of people, natives and Europeans alike, were assembled to see the train pass. The men uncovered reverently, and the grave and serious aspect of the women and children told that they recognised the solemn import of these flying carriages filled with officials military and civil, with members of Parliament and representatives of the general public. The train, upon arriving ab Wanganui, was met by an immense crowd. The whole town- appeared to have turned out. The local volunteers were present under their officers to accompany the remains of their deceased member to the grave. The same decorum was manifested. The Maoris of both sexes assembled in largo numbers to meet the train upon its arrival from Wellington. The weird tangi of the native race contrasted impressively with tho " Dead March " and the bent and silent form of the firing party. This was renewed at every street corner, dying away for an interval, then bursting forth again. The bell in the tower of the Post and Telegraph Office tolled until the immense as* semblage returned from the cemetery. The following is the order of the largest) funeral cortege Wanganui has ever seen : — Firing party, including the Permanent Force. Wanganui Garrison Band. Wanganui Town Band. Otaki Native Band. Freemasons. Gun carriage with coffin, .pall-bearers walking on either side. Chief mourners. Governor's representatives. Foreign Consuls. Members of Legislative Council. Members of House of Representatives, Mayor and Councillors of Wanganui. Members of the Harbour and River Trusts Boards. Wanganui Herald staff. Bank,of New Zealand officers. Civil servants. Alexandra Cavalry. | Volunteer officers. Old members-of Wanganui Cavalry. 1 Wanganui Fire Brigade. Foresters. Railway Employees. The general public. The whole formed a gigantic procession,' which, including v he whole of the public following and on "the footpaths on both sides, must have numbered something like 4,000 or s,ooopeople. This greab concourse of people moved slowly to the cemetery, taking a route up Victoria Avenue and along ton-street and Cemetery Road. In tho cemetery a largo square was -reserved for the mourners. Police representatives wero presenb from almost every station between New Plymouth, and here under Inspector Thomson, and with the Alexandra Cavalry were engaged keeping back tho largo crowds anxious to obtain as near a view as possible of the ceremony at the grave side. The chief mourners assembled close to the grave, accompanied by prominent Masons. The ceremony was periorm3d by the Rev. A. O. Williams, P.G.S., of tho Tongariro Lodge, assisted by Brothers-J. H. Keesing, P.M., and J. Stevens, R.W.M. The Masonic odes, " Solemn<>Sbriker," "The Funeral Chimes," and ** Days and Moments Quickly Flying," were the usual service was read. The words, " We cherish his'memory here below, we commend his spirit to God who gave it, wo commit his body to the grave," were repeated three times by the Masons, with appropriate signs. The Masonic apron, the emblem of purity, was de{>osited in the grave, after which Brother Ceesing pronounced the benediction, " Merciful and Mighty: may the virtues of our departed brother be ever green in Thy memory, as they will be in- ours." The brethren then deposited green acacia twigs into the grave, accompanied by the words, "Alas I my brother ;" and the ceremony was brought to a conclusion by the firing of three volleys by the firing party, 230 men. A great number of wreaths were sent, a fire brigade ladder-carriage being covered with them. All the Ministers were at the Premier's funeral to-day, as well as the Hoira. Shriinski, Jennings, McCullough, Richardson, Jenkinson, Rigg, Walker, and Kelly of the Legislative Council, and the following M.H.R.'s:—Speaker Steward, and Messrs. T. Thompson, W. L. Rees, E. M.Smith, W. O. Smith, J. G. Wilson, Buick, Buchanan Hutchison, R. Moore, Joyce, Wi Parata. Taipua, Hall, McGuire. G. Fisher, Mill, W. Earnshaw, Dawson, Sandford, Tanner, and Richardson. - m ■ Wellington, May I. Tho Post, which is regarded as an authority on Masonic matters, gives the following explanation of the way in which the late Premier came to be buried under the Masonic ritual Mr. Ballance was formerly Worshipful Master of the St. Andrews Kilwinning Lodge, then working under the Scotch Constitution. When Sir Robert Stout established a Lodge in this Colony, under the Grand Orient of France, Mr. Ballance joined it, and so cub himself off from Freemasonry, as recognised by the Scotch Constitution, or the New Zealand Constitution to which St. Andrew Lodge transferred its allegiance. Prior to the operation being performed, Mr. Ballance expressed a wish to Mr. Seddon, who is also a Mason, to be buried according to Masonic form by his old lodge should the operation terminate fatally. A similar wish was expressed to his wife. On this being represented to the Grand Lodge, the % M.W. Grand Master granted a dispensation to enable St. Andrew's Kilwinning Lodge to comply with Mr. Ballance's wish. The D.G. Lodge of Wellington, E.C., also granted a dispensation to enable its lodges to bake - parbiin the < ceremony, arid; the P.G. M. of the North Island, 8.C.. ; Brother McCullough, was amoogatdilie bretkroa.pre-«ont)-ab the grave. ; - ~■~

THE REPORT OF THE AUTOPSY. ~ i ,»c Wellington, April 30. Dr. Fookes (Medical Superintendent of the Asylum) and Dr. Gain (Acting Medical Superintendent of the Hospital) being in private practice, were selected to perforin the post mortem examination on the body-of the deceased Premier, for the' reason that they were altogether unconnected with the treatmenb of the patient while yeb alive, and therefore likely to give an independent) opinion, as to the actual cause of death. Their examination revealed a stricture of the large bowel, about half way down-the colon. lb corresponded to an exterior, position a little above the left hip. The obstruction was simply a ring of constriction. The incision was made on the right) side, about three feet of the extended bowel above the obstruction. This position, taken with the character of the obstruction, made ib almost impossible to form an accurate diagnosis. It should be recollected that the extended bowel is upwards of mty feet in length. The operation, as a matter of fact, was performed a little above the actual stricture, but on tho right) side of the body. It was calculated to afford great relief to tha engorged and congested state of the towels. The post-mortem examination also showed great displacement of the organs.

Letters and telegrams of condolence were sent from nearly all the public bodies in'the colony. A public meeting to consider the proposal to erecb a memorial in Wellington to the late Hon. John Ballance was held ab the Theatre Royal, Wellington, on Friday night, the 12th May. There was a fair attendance, the Mayor, Mr. H. D. 8011, presiding. On the platform wero the Premier (Hon. R. J. Seddon), Hon. Sir Patrick Buckley, Hon. A. J. Cadman, Hon. J.. Rigg, Mr. J. Duthie, M.H.R., and a large number of prominent citizens. A. -committee was appointed to collect) subscriptions throughout the colony.

We regret to announce the death of Captain James Bailey, C.8., late Deputy-Com-missary-General, who passed away -on the 23rd April at his residence, Penrose,, ab the age of 67. The deceased gentleman joined the Imperial service in 1848, and served in Ireland on tho Board of Work? till 1851. He was next sent to-the Cape of Good Hope in the Commissariat service until 1854 and afterwards served as Deputy Assistant Commissary-General in Turkey and Crimea in 1854-6. For his services in*tha Crimea he was made a C.B. After the closo of the Crimean campaign he was sent to the Bermudas for three years, and China for over a twelvemonths. Captain liailey came to New Zealand in 1861, and was Deputy Commissary-General. He had-the management of the Land Transport Corps, and rendered important service to the troops. He went to England on the withdrawal of ►he Imperial forces in 1867, bub three years afterwards returned to Auckland province where he has since resided. Captain Bailey was for some years manager of the Auckland Agricultural Company's estates, residing at the headquarters station ofFencourb, Cambridge, of which elation one of his sons is assistant manager. The deceased gentleman leaves a widow (daughter of late Mr. R. McLoan), and one daughter and four sons to mourn their loss. The funeral left " Bleak House," near Howick, on April 26, for the Howick Cemetery. We regret to record tho death of an old and respected colonist, Mr. John Fairburn, second son of the late Rev. W. T. Fairburn, of the C. M. Society, who passed away on April 21 at the age of 69, ab his residence, Otahuhu. The deceased gentleman was born ab the Bay of Islands in 1824, bub for the last 30 years has resided at Otahuhu, where he was much esteemed by his fellowsettlers for his integrity and geniality. The funeral on Sunday, April 23, was- very numerously attended. | Mrs. Mair, wife of Captain Gilbert; Mair, J Parliamentary interpreter, and who is well I known throaghoub the colony, died ab Blenheim on April 23 after a painful ill--1 ness. The remains were taken to Wellington for interment. The deceased lady was the only surviving daughter of tho late Mr. John Sperrey, Property Tax Commissioner. She bad obtained considerable eminence as an artist. Our Thames correspondent writes :— Mr. James Rattray, who for the last fourteen years had been one of tho Borough Council officials, died on the 27th April from inflammation of the lungs, which followed severe hemorrhage. The Mayor ab the Borough Council meeting that night referred to his death, and said that the deceased had, as ib were, been reared from boyhood to man's estate in the service of the Council, and had always been a most valued and trustworthy servant. Deceased,' who was only about 27 years of age, leaves a wife and three young children. He was on April 29 accorded a military funeral 1 by the local Naval Artillery corps. Our Waiuku correspondent writes Another very old settler has passed away, in the person of Mrs. Aseneth England, who died at the residence of her daughter, Mrs. Thomas Brown, on April 24. The deceased lady was much respected. Sho had attained the ripe old ago of 80 years.' Our Dairy Flab correspondent writes as follows:— I am sorry to have bo record the death of Mr. Bartholomew Foley, a settler of over 27 years in tho district. Tho deceased merited the goodwill of the whole community by his inoffensive and peaceful manner of life, which wag amply verified by the numerous attendance at the funeral, which took place at tho Roman Catholic cemebery, near the Wade. Mr. M. Lennan officiated at the grave side. The deceased was 75 years of aee, and leaves a wife- and four daughters and two sons, all grown up. Mr. Thomas King, chairman of the New Plymouth Harbour Board, died at four a.m. on April 28, aged 73 years. ■ He was-ona of the first settlers to arrive there in the William Bryant in 1841, and was elected a Member of the House of Representatives in 1854 and 1860. He held the position of treasurer in the Provincial Council, and was manager of the Bank.of New ZealaiiJ there for bis.ts?n years. Since his retirement ho has taken an acavu parb in matters connected with the harbour. Deceased leaves -a widow and three sons and a daughter. Dr. Truby King of the Seacliffe Lunatic Asylum, and Mr. Newton King, who is an auctioneer, and Mr. Henry King, and Mrs. Marchanb, .of Timaru. Deceased has been very infirm for some time. V In our obituary columns will bo found recorded the death of Mr. T. Stanley Gibbins, of Eden Terrace. Deceased, who was a comparatively young man, had been in illhealth for some time. Recently he went to Sydney, accompanied by his wife, to see if a change of air would do him good, bub little benefit was derived therefrom. He was-» printer, and served his apprenticeship in the New Zealand Herald printing office, bub for a number of years past has been employed in the Star jobbing department. We have to record the death of a very old colonist, namely, Mr. William Young, late Collector of Customs, who died at bis residence, Orakei Road,.Remaera, on the 3rd of May, in his 80th year, Mr. Young, early in "the forties" succeeded to the post of Collector of Customs, having been in the Commissariat Department, and coming down from Sydney to the Bay of Islands with the troops, ho-was appointed by Governor Hobson. Mr, Young retired, on his pension over 30-years ago, and has lived in retirement ever since. Mr. Young took great interest) in cricket, and was the "father" of Auckland cricketers, being one of the best cricketers' of his day. He leaves a grown-up family of five sons and three daughters. The intermeat took place at , St. Mark's Cemetery, and was private. Mc Young was highly esteemed and respected for his many personal qualities, and his genial disposition. ■>■'■■/■ ,•■> : | A man namediJamuelPattlson was found dead in his bed, a* the Governor Bo wen Hotel, Thames, on Thursday morning, the 4bh May. He was last seen alive- at halfpast seven o'clock the previous evening, at which time he retired to his bedroom. It appears > he i has ; been in ill-health : for ' several : :< months past, 4 suffering from ym affection of the , chest, and fchis,»o*dou«wg was the chief cense of his death. ;,JDeoe«seOj was a a well-known endl highly : re»poctod r miner, and had resided at the. i since shortly after thetfWWtal^M* o "**

Another old colonist) has joined the great majority, in the person of Mr. Thomas Hancock, who died on April 23 at hia residence, Newmarket, at the advanced age of 86. He h«.s been in Auckland for over 40 years, and was the founder of Hancock's brewery, Newmarket. Deceased leaves a grown-up family. An old settler of Onehnnga, Mr. Fergus Keehan, died on April 30, at the age of 66 years, after an illness of a few weeks' duration. Mr. Keehan came to the colony about thirty years ago, and by indomitable perseverance and industry acquired an independence. Until within a few months of his death he was a member of tbeOnehunga Borough Council and Licensing Committee. He leaves a widow and grown up family. Mr. Abraham Myers, a very old resident at Obago, died on May 1 of heart disease.

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OBITUARY., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 9204, 19 May 1893, Supplement

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5,180

OBITUARY. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXX, Issue 9204, 19 May 1893, Supplement

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