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AUCKLAND SOCIETY OF ARTS' EXHIBITION.

The twelfth annual exhibition of the Auckland Society of Arts was opened on the 2nd March at the Choral Hall, when a private view of the pictures was given to the members and their friends. There was a large attendance, including some of the officers of the warships. Shortly after eight o'clock Sir William Fox, vice-president of the Society, ascended the platform, and after an interesting address declared the Exhibition open.

The work by students and amateurs shows a much higher standard of excellence than that of the previous exhibitions. The work of the Elam School of Art is

coming to the front, and is in close competition with Christchurch, although the pupils are not yet so advanced in life studies. While it is regretted that so many of the Society's prizes have gone to Christchurch the effect has been to stimulate the Auckland students. The prize work from Mr. F. Wright's studio and pupils is quite equal to the Christchurch School of Art. Class I. : Studies by Pupils or Amateurs. —(a) In crayons, charcoal, or monochrome. Section 1 : Shaded Study of a Head from the antique.—There were 13 entries, all good specimens of class work. The first prize is taken by Mr. R. Pheney (Wright's studio) with some good work, and the second by Miss C. Kidson, of Christchurch. In section 2, shaded study of a figure from the antique, there were only four examples, and Miss E. M. Roshfort, of Nelson, takes lirst prize, to whom, also, the silver medal for the best work in monochrome is awarded. It is a very tasteful and highly finished work. Second place is taken by Mr. J. P. Giamboniui (Elam school) for a very effective drawing. Section 3, shaded study of hands or feet, from the antique (life size), brought out seven entries, principally from the Elam School of Art, exhibiting very careful drawing. Miss Newton (Elam School) takes first prize with an excellent piece of work, the drawing and shading being artistic. Miss Ethel Rees (Elam School) runs Miss Newton very close with some good work on the same subject. In Section 4, shaded study from the round (ornament), there were 10 entries. The prize is taken by Miss Alice Denison (Wright's studio) with one of the best drawings of the kind wo have seen. This work takes the bronze medal lor the second best work in tbo whole of tho competitions in monochrome. Miss Nina Jones, of Nelson, takes second, and her modelling is tasteful and true. A study by Miss E. Reeves is also well worthy of note. (B) in colour : Section 5, Study of still life, in oil. This section brought out 11 entries. Several of tho works in this

section are of such great excellence as to warrant their being hung on the line. Mrs. E. M. Walrond (Wright's studio) takes first prize and bronze medal for a study of flowers and foliage. The roses and begonias are beautifully painted, and the pottery very realistic. Second place is secured by Miss E. Turner, of Christchurch, for a most artistic study of flowers and vase. It is beautifully soft and suggestive. In section 0, study of still life, in water colours, there are four entries. Miss lvingsfcrd's water colour study (tho first prize) occupies a conspicuous place in the water colour exhibits. Mr. Edwin Bartley's study of fruit is a difficult subjecta bunch of grapes and some peaches. The fruit is well treated, and the work generally is of a high character. Wright's studio furnishes the pupils for both first and second prizes, (c) Section 7, problem in perspective, stated in words and worked in ink. There were eight entries. These difficult subjects have been treated with great skill, the result of careful teaching. The first prize is taken by Mr. E. E. Matthews (Elam School), and the second by Mr. Cecil Stickley, of the same school. Section 8, geometrical, architectural, or mechanical drawing in line, worked in ink. This section elicited six entries. In archi-

tcctural drawing some careful work is exhibited, the problems being worked out with painstaking accuracy. Both first and second prizes go to C. E. Burnsden, of Christchurch.

Class II : Original Studies, Direct from Nature. —in section 9, study of animal life, there was but one entry, and no award. Section 10, landscape or marine study, in oil or water colours, brought out four entries. Miss E. R. Budden, of Christchurch, takes first place for a water colour study of a beach, and boats hauled up under a cliff. This is a very effective sketch, the colouring and drawing being good. Miss Nina Jones, of Nelson, secures second, with a study in oil, "Waiting for the Tide"—a cutter lying on the beach. Miss Budden also got the silver medal for the best' work in the whole of the competitions in colour. There was great difficulty in making this award, owing to the difference in composition, medium, and the diversity of subjects. In the opinion of many, whose opinions on this matter are entitled to respect, the silver medal should have gone to Miss Dora Meeson, of Christchurch. In section 11, study of a native tree, in oil, water colour, or monochrome, there were five entries. Mr. Francis S. West, of Henderson, who takes first prize, has a charming study of cabbage trees. Miss Budden, of Christchurch, takes second place with a study of South Island pine trees, which, like the rest of her work, is of a high character. Class 111: Original designs in* any medium. Section 12, Design for Decorative Panel, Natural Foliage. MissE. G. Culliford has an excellent study in clematis flowers, but debarred from competition, there being only one entry. The entry in section 13 —plaque, vase, or tiles painted — was also disqualified for the same reason. Class IV. : Modelling in Clay ok Wax.

In section 14original bust, medallion, or group—there was bub one entry. This work was a bust, modelled from life, by Miss G. W. Purchas, of her father. As a first essay in this art it is excellent, and as the work of an export it would be considered meritorious. The pose of the head is good, and the profile pleasing. The beard is rather too close and massive. Special Phizes.—A special prize of three guineas by Mr. J. R. Manna for the best study of a head from life (life size) in oil or water colours (section 17), brought out seven entries. Miss Edith E. Munnings, of Christchurch, takes first prize with a fine painting of the head of an old man, which is a careful and artistic piece of work. Miss Dora Meeson, of Christchurch, is awarded second place for the study of the head of a young girl with flowing hair, which has been very much admired, being excellently painted in a bold and vigorous fashion, though nob quite finished. The pose, flesh tints, treatment of tho hair, and colouring, are admirable. Miss Munnings' work is run close by that of Miss Culliford, whose head of a young girl has been more carefully finished. Mr. Hanna also gave a special prize of two guineas for the beststudy of a head from life (life size) in monochrome (section 18). This competition brought up several entries of great merit, in which Christchurch certainly takes the pre-emi-nence, many being from the same model. The sketch of Miss Budden, of Christchurch, is at once charming and forciblo, and takes first prize. This work deserves the silver medal for monochromes, but the artist was disqualified by having received a similar honour in a previous year competition. Mr. Edward Harris, of Christchurch, takes second place with a lady's head in crayon. Second placo was erroneously printed in the catalogue as having been awarded to Miss Rochfort, of Nelson.

The Society of Arts Exhibition was continued until Saturday evening, March 12. On March 9 there was a large attendance, and the limelight exhibition was a great success, the ante-room being crowded to its utmost limits, and some could not obtain admission. The oxyhydrogen lantern was again furnished and manipulated by Mr. F. Will, the slides showing " London by Day and flight," the views being loaned by Mr. Caughey, of Messrs. Smith and Caughey.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18920325.2.68.18

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIX, Issue 8835, 25 March 1892

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1,378

AUCKLAND SOCIETY OF ARTS' EXHIBITION. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIX, Issue 8835, 25 March 1892

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