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A BATTLE BETWEEN BEASTS.

THE FIERCE ENCOUNTER OP A CINNAMON BEAK AND A MOUNTAIN LION.

A short time ago in the light of the moon two brothers, old prospectors and hunters, who have been in the hills for years and have seen many strange and startling sights, report having seen one of the most thrilling and desperate fights they have ever witnessed.

They were camping in a canyon that comes into the main San Antonio canyon from the west, about one and one-half miles below the miners' camp. They had been out during the day prospecting on the south slope of Baldy, and had started for cnmp near sundown, when they killed a deer, which delayed them till dark. They hung the deer in a tree rather than pack it to camp over the rocks in the dark, the place where they left the deer being only a short distance from camp, in the west fork of the canyon. They had hardly rolled themselves in their blankets when they heard an unearthly roar and scream, quickly followed by other roars and screams, as though a whole menagerie of wild beasts had been turned loose. It took them but a few moments to determine the cause of the disturbance. So, dressing quickly, and taking their rifles, they started to see the fun. By crossing the canyon in which they were camped they went over a point from the point of which they could command a view of quite a piece of the western canyon. When they gained the top of the point they saw just below them, not 100 yar:ls iaway, what had caused .the noise. They could see the tree where they had hung their deer, and just beneath the tree they saw the doer and two other animals—a monster Californian lion and an immense cinnamon bear. They had eraelled out the deer, and had come for a feast, each little oxpocting the other ; but there they were, fighting over the carcase to see which was to be master of the situation.

■ Their roaring and screaming awoke a thousand echoes in the canyon, which made the fight seem more dreadful still. It was a fight to the death. Struggling and rolling, biting and clawing, scratching and screaming, did the monsters fight, only breaking away from one another long enough, seemingly, to regain their breath and strength, when at it they would go again with roar and scroam. Thus they fought for over an hour, when, torn, bleeding, and completely exhausted, evidently dying, they rolled apart, only to lie and snarl at each other, unable from their terrible exertions to do more. But there were near worse enemies to them than they were bo each other. Quietly the two brothers, knowing there was nothing, to fear from the two exhausted champions, levelled their rifles, and after five shots had been fired the two , mighty beasts had ceased their struggles, having gained what each had tried to do for the other, for the two fighters of Old Baldy lay dead. There lay a Californian lion that measured eight feet four inches from tip of nose to tip of tail a king of his race. The bear, a cinnamon, was a monster of his species. As near as they could estimate he would have weighed 1000 pounds. Each was a mass of cuts and wounds. The lion had one fore-leg crushed and mangled, as though from a bite, and the bear was cub from muzzle to tail .by the knife-like claws of his more active opponent.—" Buckskin," in the Ontario Observer,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18911121.2.66.24

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVIII, Issue 8730, 21 November 1891

Word Count
598

A BATTLE BETWEEN BEASTS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVIII, Issue 8730, 21 November 1891

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