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COUNTRY NEWS.

[from our own correspondents.]

Hamilton, Thursday. The want of pure drinking water is badly felt in the main portion of West Hamilton. Not a drop of water fit for household consumption is at any time obtainable from wells sunk on ten acres in the centre of the business part of the town, on the block between Hood, Anglesea, and Victoria streets, and the inhabitants depend for a local supply from the tanks, and as these are dry, from water carried from the river. A very moderate outlay from the loan fund would obviate this yearly recurrence, and give the town a partial water supply. One of Richardson s small windmills, placed on the bank of the river, would keen a small reservoir, a tank would suffice, filled with water, and from this tank a ram could be worked which would send the water into a cistern in the Jubilee Garden, where a drinking fountain, or pump, and trough available from the outside could be provided, and the water could be carried again from thence by a two-inch iron pipe to another drinking fountain half-way between the Hamilton and Commercial Hotels. The whole of the business portion of West Hamilton, including the block above referred to, could thus be supplied with an abundance of pure water, available also in case of fire, for a sum certainly not exceeding £100. Mr. Robert Bradley had he done nothing else has earned the gratitude of the people for the most useful watlr supply at the cast end of the bridge, and the Councillor who will propose and work out the above scheme will succeed in covering as many municipal sins as he may have been guilty of. It is proposed by the Borough Council to proceed at once to take a poll of the burgesses to obtain leave to devote a second £ 1000 of the loan to the wiping out of the several overdrafts. If this is permitted it must be on the distinct understanding that another overdraft is not started, and run up to the fullest extent as soon as the old one is wiped out, as was done when the loan was :'vst raised.

A sura of £.10 has been fixed as the stakes for the Steeplechase at Claudelands on the 12th April. Something should be done at once to the furthermost pier adjoining the earthwork embankment at the west end of the Hamilton traffic bridge, the piles of which are fast rotting. The control of the bridge rests with the Borough Council, although the two counties pay half the cost of maintenance. Mr. Bryce, in making a few remarks to the gentlemen who received him at Hamilton on Tuesday, stated that. the settlers of Waipa had established a strong claim upon him, and that if he stood at all at the next election, and the district wished it, he was entirely at the disposal of the electors. Ohaupo, Thursday. Great complaints are made of the Manilla binding twine of colonial manufacture supplied to Waikato farmers. One settler complains that it would not stand the necessary strain when used for thatching, another that it will not deliver half-a-dozen sheaves from the reaper and binder without breaking. Could. not a suitable article be manufactured locally from our own New Zealand flax? Whatawhata, Thursday. The annual picnic of the school children, thanks Co the interest taken in carrying out the arrangements by Mr. and Mrs. lain and Mrs. Dawson, was a great success. It was eld on the green near the the schoolhouse, where a variety of games and sports were engaged in. The elder folk wound up the evening with a dance in the schoolhouse.

[BY telegraph.—OWN correspondents.] Cambridge, Thursday. The ordinary meeting of the Borough Council was held last night. Present: Mr. J. H. Priestly (Mayor), and Messrs. J. Hally, James Webber, James Young, Richardson, Fawcett, Ferguson, Bond, and Gillett. The Mayor's action in re postal service was approved of. The Mayor stated that the memorial to Mr. Hudson for a daily train had been largely signed and forwarded. A reply had been received from Mr. Hudson to the effect that the same was receiving careful attention, and that a definite reply would be forwarded so soon as completed. It was resolved to reduce the yard fees at the Borough Yards to £ per cent. An application was received from Mr. Dyer, acting for Sir William Wasteneys for the transfer of lease of allotment 601 (premises of Waikato News) for a period of three months from Sir W. Wasteneys to Mr. Mllward, who ha» leased the Cambridge paper. In the matter of railway reform, Mr. Bond thought the suggestion of the Farmer's Club that the League should formulate a series ot resolutions, and forward copies to all local bodies, so as to ensure uniformity of action, a good one. The question was allowed to stand over. An . application was made by Mr. Mllward for the use of the Public Hall for six months, two nights a week. As the purpose for which the hall was required was not stated, it was resolved to ask Mr. Milward to state his requirement, and on receipt of his reply the matter to be considered at a special meeting. The Furze Committee presented their report. As the action to be taken thereupon was decided at the last meeting, nothing was now done. PAPAKURA. We have to record the loss of another of our most useful and universally esteemed and respected settlers in the death of Mr*. Willis, who, after a lengthened illness, which she bore with exemplary patience and Christian fortitude, peacefully departed from this life on the sth February in the 62nd year of her age, The deensed was a. pioneer settler oi

the colony, having arrived in the Bay of Islands in 1840, and after residing there some time she came to Auckland, and in 18481 she, alone with husband, the late Mr. Robert Willis, became the first settlers at Papakura. The funeral took place on the Friday following, and was largely attended, lhe Rev. T.Norrie officiated, and in the course of an impressive address he paid a well-deserved tribute to the pioneers of the colon y.< »™ especially to the mothers, and among them he referred to the deceased as worthy of all praise. Her goodness of heart, her benevolence which shone forth in kindly deeds to all around, her many virtues and Christian graces, and in general her useful life and peaceful death, were recounted as an example that might well stimulate others to be "followers of those who through faith and patience, axe now inheriting the promises. The whole service was very affecting and full ot sympathy with the sorrowing sons and daughters, and other relatives who are lett to mourn their loss. On Sabbath last reference was made to this event in the pulpits of the Presbyterian and Anglican Churches in the village, and suitable hymns were also sung.—[A Correspondent.] -

WAIROA RIFLES. A GRAND concert and ball, in connection with the Wairoa Rifles, was held in the Wairoa Public Hall, on Friday evening, the 7th instant. The hall was beautifully decorated with evergreens. There was a good attendance. Captain J. Creighton presided, and in an excellent address said the volunteers of Wairoa were not so well supported by the people of the district as they should be, and he hoped the people of Wairoa would take more iuterest in this matter. The following programme was then gone through in a most satisfactory manner :— Duet, pianoforte, Messrs. Adams and Edwards; song, "Queen of the Earth," Mr. Tait; song, I Will Ne'er Forget," Miss Tait; song, "Flora McDonald's Lament." Miss Moncur; song, " Kissing," Mr. Findlayson (encored); violin solo, Mr. Tait; song, '-Alas! Those Chimes," Miss Tait: duet, "I Have Wandered In Dreams," Mr. and Miss Tait ; song, " I Lo'e Nae Laddie But Ane," Miss Moncur. Miss Moncur had to submit to a recall, and gave the song "Caller Herring." Reading, " Mrs. Caudle's Umbrella," Mr. DeCastro: song, " Marguerite," Mr. Tait. Mr. Tait had to appear a second time, and gave the song, " Walking in the Garden. Maud." Recitation, " Maloney's Fenian Cat," Mr. Findlayson. This gentleman was encored several times, and pleased the young people with comic songs. Song, "Pretty Jane," Mr. Tait. This was the last item on the programme. The customary votes of thanks were passed with applause. The company then sang "Auld Lang Syne," the audience joining. This brought to a close a most pleasant concert. The hall was then cleared, and dancing was kept up until early morn, Messrs. Adams and Edwards supplying excellent music—-[Own Correspondent, February 11.]

NESS VALLEY (WAIROA SOUTH). At the close of the usual monthly service on the 9th of February, the annual meeting of the Presbyterian Church was held ; the Rev. T. Norrie in the chair. From the report of the treasurer it appeared that the following sums had been received for the year 1889 — Sustentation fund, £7256 d; Foreign Mission, Is Od ; Dayspring fund (collected by Miss S. McCall), 6s 6d : total, £7 10s 6d. The report was adopted. It was formally agreed to procure a harmonium to aid in the service of song, and several subscriptions have been promised for this object. The following were appointed as the committee for the present year :-—Messrs. McKenzie (secretary and treasurer), McCall and McCormick.—[A Correspondent.] __^

«* PAPAROA. The good prices realised by Messrs. Haines Brothers' wool at the recent wool sale, have led some of the settlers here to seriously consider the advisability of dipping their sheep. Messrs. Hames dipped the greater number of their sheep last year, using Cooper's dipping powder, in a dip of their own construction, according to the directions of our late sheep inspector, Mr. Elliott, with very satisfactory results. Perhaps the greatest benefit arising from dipping, one at least which will commend itselt to an intelligent mind, is the fact that, owing to the sheep being freed from the tormenting presence of those troublesome insects called ticks, they no longer felt the urgent necessity of rubbing their backs and sides against every log and stump which presented itself; the manifest result being that the fleeces were in a much better condition. Wilson and Co.'s hydraulic lime was used in mixing the concrete for the dip and draining-pens, and has stood well.. Care should be taken that good sharp sand be used in preparing the last coat. Messrs. Ariell, Cliff, F. Colbeck, Jackman, and Tibbits were on Saturday nominated,, and there beiug no opposition, were declared elected a licensing committee for the Paparoa district. They were nominated on what is called the moderate ticket. I believe they will hold the position foi- three years.—[Own Correspondent.]

MARERETU.

On Sunday last the anniversary services in connection with the Wesleyan Church here were conducted by the Rev. G. Marshall, who preached both in the looming and afternoon to a large congregation. On Monday the annual Wesleyan soit#e aud concert was held. The attendance iras not so large as on previous years, owing no doubt to the counter attractions at Mangapiii and elsewhere, but on the whole the entertainment fully sustained the prestige which the former ones have acquired. An excellent tea was provided, the viands being in great abundance, and of a most toothsome description. The tables were efficiently presided over by the following ladies : — Misses Hudspith (3), M. Gibson, A. M. Evans, and Mesdames H. M. Hudspith, J. Hnllah, and J. H. Evans. After justice had been done to the tarts, sandwiches, etc., the tables were removed, and Mr. E. Pheasant (of Matakohe) took the chair, and the following programme was gone through : —lnstrumental duet (harmonium), Miss M. Hudspith and Miss M. Gibson ; glee," Where are theßeapers,"Mareretu choir ; recitation, " Hang up the Baby's Stocking," Miss Jane Birt; duet, " Children's Voices," Mrs. G. T. Marshall and Mrs. O. C. Hames; glee, "Beautiful Home," Paparoa Wesleyan Choir ; recitation, " Kelly and Her Bird," Miss Ultine Birt ; glee, selection from the "Children's Hosaunas," Paparoa Choir ; duet, " Take the Wings of the Morning," Misses E. and A. Hudspith. Addresses were delivered by the Rev. G. T. Marshall, Mr.'H. M. Hudspith, and Mr. T. W. Wilson during the evening. Any comment on the pro gramme is unnecessary, as each item was successfully given and enthusiastically received. The entertainment was shortened owing to several who had promised to sing failing to fulfil their engagements. The accompanists during the evening were Messrs. E. Wright and 0. C. Hames. At the close of the entertainment, Mr. R. Hames moved a hearty vote of thanks to all who had taken part in entertaining the meeting, and especially to the ladies for the good things dispensed that evening. This was?, seeonded by Mr. J. H. Trounson, and carried by acclamation. The annual financial statement was read by Mr. H. M. Hudspith, which showed that the debt on the chapel was being rapidly reduced, about £15 only remaining. It is, I think, only fair to state that this satisfactory suite of affairs is due in a large measure to Mr. Hudspith's own exertions. No further information has been received respecting the expenditure of the £350 voted by Government for the continuation northwards of the Mareretu-Waikiekie Road. The member for this riding (Mr. Birt) is busying himself in endeavouring to get the work in progress before the end of the financial year.. The continuation of this road on to Waikiekie would give a great impetus to the progress and prosperity of Mareretu. It therefore behoves those interested to bestir themselves and assist in agitating for this long desired" boon. Exceedingly hot weather has prevailed here during the past week. On more than one occasion the thermometer registered 126deg. in the sun. The proposal to erect a hall in the district is meeting with general approval, and is being liberally supported. Between £60 and £70 have already oeeh subscribed. —[Own Correspondent.] RAGLAN. On Sunday, the 2nd inst., the Rev. J. Haselden visited this district, preaching in the afternoon at Waitetuna, and in the evening at Raglan. His discourse at night touched principally upon the best way to keep holiday. During the service the rev. gentleman presented Mr. LaTrobe with a license to act as lay reader from Bishop Cowie. On Monday night the Rev J. Haselden lectured in the Raglan schoolroom, taking for his subject "Christianity in England, and ably illustrating the lecture with magiclantern views. On Monday, the 3rd inst., a wedding took place between Mr. Stewart, master of Matakohe, and Miss Annie LaTrobe, of Raglan. The newly-married pair are now en route for Matakohe, via Auckland, carrying with them the good wishes of their Raglan friends. m On Sunday afternoon a patch of green flax situated between Okete and Waitetuna was destroyed by fire. The patch was said to contain 200 tons, and belonged to Mr., M. Harsant, who was supplying it to Ormiston Brothers at their Okete flaxmill.— Correspondent.]

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18900214.2.53

Bibliographic details

COUNTRY NEWS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVII, Issue 8179, 14 February 1890

Word Count
2,483

COUNTRY NEWS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVII, Issue 8179, 14 February 1890

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