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CLERK OF PARLIAMENT.

RESIGNATION OF MAJOR

CAMPBELL.

PROBABLE CALL TO THE UPPER

HOUSE.

[BY TELEGRAPH.—-OWN CORRK3PONDKNT.] Wellington, Tuesday. The resignation of Major Francis Eastwood Campbell, clerk to the House of Representatives, and clork of the Parliament of New Zealand, is announced. This event had been rumoured from time to time after each session of the General Assembly* The reasons assigned for snoh anticipations woro various. The more obvions reasons in this case are the real reasons—namely : that Major Campbell had filled the position ho now resigns for a period of thirty-five years, and that lately he has found the duty of incessant attendance upon the deliberations of Parliament prejudicial to his health. Ho retires with the respect and sympathy of all who were either personally acquainted or officially connected with him. The night work of Parliament has had a very prejudicial influence upon his health. Tho capacity in which Major Campbell has served the colony did not allow much scope for individual enterprise, or intellectual display, but his office, nevertheless, was one of the most important in the public service, and lie had during his tenure of it discharged his duties with great personal dignity and authority. He has been enabled to invest official reserve with great courtesy and dignity, and to maintain his personal influence and authority by considerable kindness and delicacy. His father, Colonel Campbell, an officer in tho Imperial service, was One of the oarliest settlers iii Now Zealand who took great interest in all matters relating to early settlement in this colony. The late Clerk of Parliament was also an Imperial military officer. Ho was a captain in the 23rd Regiment when he arrived hero, in the time of Governor Gore Browno. Ho was born in the year 1823, so that ho is now 66 years old, although looking much younger. Major Campbell rendered important military service to tho colony in tho early days, in company with Captain Stewart, who was military secretary to Governor Gore Browne. He organised the Ist and 2nd companies of Volunteers in New Zealand. These services were rendered in Auckland from 1554 to 1864, when tho seat of Government was removed to Auckland. He performed other military services. He organised the militia which was called out upon the outbreak of the Waitnra war, and, aided by hie advice, the. defensive organisation under various military officorb who hold Her Majesty's commission in New Zealand. Before coming to New Zealand lie served with his regiment in Canada. Tho rumour has again obtained currency that Major Campbell will be called to the Legislative Council. There is reason to believe that all sections of the Honse of Representatives would concur in tho propriety of such an appointmoiit. All tho influential people I have spoken to upon the subject acquiesce in tho opinion that Major Campbell in the Legislative Council could discharge most important public functions. His great experience of Parliamentary procedure and practice would invest his opinion upon a subject of that nature with the highest authority. The continuity in the legislature of such practical acquaintance with t.ho spiritof Parliamentary usageand tho forms of debate is, taken by itself, an important matter. Tho public journals which have yet commented on the resignation of Major Campbell are unanimous in their recognition of his important public services, and his claim to some special distinction, which would have tho effect of giving greater dignity to an official retirement after a service of 35 years, in a capacity which required for tho fulfilment of its duty . personal and intellectual qualities of a high order. ' It is said that Major Campbell is likely to spend the years of his rotiremont in Auckland. I believe he has the kindliest sympathy for Auckland and its people, but I cannot forget that some of his family aro now settled in the Canterbury province. I am sure ho will bo respected and honoured in Auckland, where he is so well known.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18891009.2.30

Bibliographic details

CLERK OF PARLIAMENT., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVI, Issue 9491, 9 October 1889

Word Count
657

CLERK OF PARLIAMENT. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXVI, Issue 9491, 9 October 1889

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