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OBITUARY.

The death of Mrs. Nome, wife of the Rev. Thomas Norrie, of Papakura, which occurred on November 7, will cause deep regret to all who knew her estimable qualities, and create a sad blank in a wide circle of friends. Arriving at Auckland in 1555, in company with her husband, to whom she was married shortly after his receiving his appointment to the colonial field, she shared with him the toil and trials incident to the work of establishing the Church in sparsely settled country districts. The difficulty of obtaining a residence was overcome by the generosity of the Hon. James Farmer, who placed at their service the house which had been newly erected on his property at Drury. But, some little time thereafter, a manse having been erected at Papakura, on the glebe presented to the Church by Mr. W. S. Grahame, they took up their permanent abode therein, and made that tho centre of Church operations for the future. There, accordingly, with the exception of a short interval during the native war in 1863, when, for better security, she and her children were removed to Otahuhu, the deceased spent the long, and though chequered, yet happy period of 33 years, until, as the announcement states, an attack of inflammation of the lungs terminated her patient and useful life. She will bo greatly missed by her husband, whose numerous labours sho did so §much to lighten, and by the large family she leaves to mourn their loss, as also by many colonists, both old and young, who had benefited by her genial and kind disposition. Though of such long standing as a colonist, she has yet been cut off in comparatively the prime of life. But the struggles ot her earlier years had told upon her constitution, and in its enfeebled state it ottered but a brief resistance to the attack which has proved fatal. The community can ill afford to lose so quiet and unobtrusive a worker for its welfare as Mrs. Norrie proved herself to be. Her death bus cast a gloom over the district in which she lived, and the settlers far and near were found in attendance at her funeral, which look place at Papakura at one p.m. on November U. The memorable wreck of the steamer Tararua, at Wai pa pa Point, in 1881, is recalled by the death, at the age of 39, uf Mrs. Paddon, of Fortrose. On that occasion tho deceased lady, who was of tine physique and a splendid horsewoman, rude over rough country and throuirh a, number of streams with food and clothing for the survivors, while she also took an active part in the melancholy task of dressing for burial the bodies washed ashore For her services she received the thanks of a number of public bodies and a presentation. Our Mercury Bay correspondent writes :— Quite a gloom has been cast over u large circle of friends by the death on the I'Jlli October, after a lingering illness, of Mr. William Howard. Tho deceased geutie man—of kind, gentle, and unobsirusive habits, made him a. universal favourite. His pleasant face and graceful form will btt sadly missed in the snug and tastefully furnished parlour at Whenuakite House, not only by his arllicted wife, but by a largo circle of friends, whom the deceased was wont to entertain, and to extend his hospitality. The funeral, which was numerously attended by friends from Mercury Bay and surrounding , districts, loft the deceased's late resideuce, Whenuakite River, at eight a.m. o;i tho 21st October, in Mr. Meiklo's steam launch, for the cemetery, on the south bank of the Whenuakite River, about iive miles down. A number of ladies gathered round the grave, and strewed the coffin with fiowers. Tho Rev. W. Lee, of Mercury Bay, very impressively performed the funeral service. The death of Mrs. Hooker, at the ripe age of eighty-six years, removes another of our old identities. She arrived with her husband and family at Taranaki, in 1542, residing there lor six years, when the family removed to Auckland, where she has been for about thirty yours. She made many friends, and was very highly respected. The deceased survived her husband eleven years, but leaves a large number o: relatives to mourn their loss, amongst them being three sons and one daughter, forty grandchildren, and fiftythret) great-grandchildren. Intelligence has been received from the Rev. E. V. Cooper, of Huahine, that the Rev. \\. E, Richards, missionary at Kaiatea, Society Islands, is dead. Mr. Richards left Raiateu in September for the island of Rurutu, with the view of opening a native church. Hβ left Raiatea in a small craft built by the native?, and sailed by them. On the arrival of the barque John Williams at Raiatea, Captain Turpie was alarmed at the absence of tho missionary, who was reported to have been unwell when he loft. Captain Turpie chartered a small vessel to proceed at once to Rurutu to ascertain the state of things there, and the probability is that Mr. Richards took cold during his passage over, and died in Rurutu. We are informed that Mrs. Richards and child are on their way to Sydney. Mr. Richards was first appointed by the London Missionary Society to labour in the Education Department at Madras. Ho worked hard amongst tho students, and was much esteemed by them ; but he was seized with choleraic dysentery, and was taken to Madras Hospital, whero he was brought very low. His medical adviser recommended him to corne to Sydney. The change of climate was beneficial to him. He was unable to return to India, but was to take up a station in the South Sea Islands. Mr. Richards was accordingly appointed to Raiatea in 1884, and his health greatly improved, rendering him able to carry on native missionary work. The recent conflicts between the French and the native residents were very trying to him. He endeavoured to act as a peacemaker between tho contending parties. It is evident that the effort was beyond his strength, and whilst seeking a change of labour and scene he died at Rurutu.

Many old Auckland residents will regret to hear of the death of Mr. Charles Culledge Barley. Mr. Barley arrived here in 1855, and opened the store then standing on the site where the shop of Mr. Atkin, draper, now is. Tho store was made very attractive by a large signboard over the verandah painted with the flags of the Hied Armies. It was called " The Alliance Store." Alter about three years Mr. Barley left Auckland owing to the business not paying. The rent at that time was £'.i per week. Mr. Barley was one of the first, ii not the first, to issue tokens, in lieu of small cards, bearing "IOLJ Id," or as the case might be, 6d. This had to be done owing to the scarcity of small coin. Mr. Barley died at his residence, Peel - street, Wincksor, near Melbourne.

Our Waipu correspondent writes :—This week it is my sad duty to chronicle the death of a young man, taken away in his bloom. Hugh Alexander, the third son of Mr. Hugh McKeirae, J.P., passed over to the great majority, after a long and painful illness, sustained throughout with Christian fortitude, on November 4, aged 24 years. The deceased young man was much respected throughout the district for his unselfish and generous habits, and more especially by his own class, tor his genial and kind disposition. Widespread sympathy is felt for the bereaved family for the loss of a dutiful son and an affectionate brother, whose early death was the first cause of grief the deceased occasioned to his people, and that grief will be lusting. The funeral took place on November (j, and as a mark of respect for their departed friend, his mortal remains were followed to their final resting-place by one of the largest assemblages of people I have witnessed here. The funeral service was impressively rendered by the Rev. G. Jones.

Mr. W. Atkinson, an old colonist, died a few days ago at Hangiora, Canterbury. Hβ landed at Nelson early in the forties.

Another old settler, Mr. Hurndall, connected with the early history o. '.he Alberfcland settlements, has passed away within the last few days, at his residence, Hamilton Road, Ponsonby, and was buried at the Avondale Cemetery on November '25 by the Rev. Mr. Runciman. Mr. Hurndall arrived in Auckland by the ship Owen Glendower, in 1863, and joined some of the special settlers who came out at the same time by the Tyburnia. They took up land at Maungaturoto, and here for more than twenty years Mr. Hurndall took a leading part in all matters connected with the welfare of the settlement. For fifteen years lie was chairman of the Road Board, and was elected to the County Council when that body was formed. He was for many years chairman of the school committee and the licensing- committee, also in the Commission of the Peace, and for many years attended actively to his duties in this department. Deceased took great interest in all religious matters, ana was senior deacon of the Church to which he belonged, and whilst the district was without a minister conducted the services in the Church. The immediate cause of death was a fall whilst walking in the garden, which fractured the thigh bone, and caused a severe shock to the nervous system. At the time of his death he was seventy-three years of age. A well-known resident, Mr. Frank Perrott, check-taker at the Opera House, died somewhat suddenly on November 22. The following are the particulars so far as we have been able to gather them : —Deceased was at the Opera House the previous evening attending to his duties, and reached home about midnight in his usual health, and went to bed. About three o'clock in the morning his daughter heard him moaning, and on going into his bedroom to ascertain the cause, found that blood was issuing from his mouth. At his request she called in a neighbour, Mrs. Ellsworth, and some brandy was administered to him, and hot bottles put to his feet, as he complained of cold. He would not allow a medical man to be sent for at that hour, but early in the forenoon he consented to Dr. Lewis being called. Unfortunately the doctor was not in, and word was left for him. At this time deceased seemed to fee'i a little better, but later on, after two o'clock p.m., he got worse, took a fit of coughing, spitting more blood, and shortly after, exclaiming, " I'm dying," he expired. He had been in indifferent health for some months, and consulted various doctors. His latest medical attendant had been Dr. Bnkewell, who states that the cause of death was ulceration and aneurism of the aorta.

The funeral of the late Mrs. William Lynch, of the Aurora Hotel, Victoria-street, took place on Nov. 21 at the Symonds-street Rosrnan Catholic Cemetery, and was largely attended. The remains were first taken to St. Patrick's Cathedral, where the Rev. Father Hackett read a portion of the burial service. Thft brethren of the Hibernian and Oddfellows' Societies were present in regalia, while a number of old residents took part in the funeral cortege. One of the oldest settlers at Mangapai, Mr. John Hall, was found lying dead in his house on Thursday, Nov. 8. He was 70 years oU, and was living alone at the time of his death. Mrs. Bullians paid him a visit the evening before his death, and found him in oheenul spirits. Hh nephew, Mr. Robert Hall, who resides within about a mile of him, usually went to =ee him once or twice a week, ami intended to have paid him a visit ou Wednesday, but was prevented till tho evening of his death, when he found his uncle lying dead at the fireside. He had not been many minutes dead when found, as lie was suil warm, and the tire, of small wood, was still burning. It was fortunate he did not fall iiilo the lire. From the position in winch the body was lying, he seemed to have made an attempt to rise up, perhaps to go to bed, but finding himself ill, tell in the attempt. His interment took place on the 10th, and was attended by a large number of friends, although tho day was very stormy with heavy rain. Mr. Harrison conducted a short service at the house and at tne grave. Mr.-Hall arrived in New Zealand July, 1859, and shortly afterwards settled in Mangapai, where he has since resided.

There has just died at Mercury Bay Mr. William Frost, son of the late Thomas Frost, of Howick, He had been for 15 years iu th« service of Mr. Bloxsouie, of Gumtown, Mercury Bay, where he was a great favourite with both Maoris and Europeans. The body was brought on by the steamer Douglas, and through the kindness of tho captain landed at Buckiand's Wharf, Howiek. A large coacourto of people of both races followed the remains to the vessel. The tunerul left his mother's residence, Howick, on November h. Captain T. Sproule, one of the earliest settlers at Lytielton, died there ou Nov. 5, aged 77. lie first came there in ltiol, in command of the barque Hoogley, from Australia, was harbourmaster and pilot from 1557 to lbtiO, and was afterwards marine aurveyor for Lloyds and the New Zealand Shipping Company. The funeral oi Miss Jahn took place on Nov. 11, and was largely attended. The interment took place at St. Thomas' cemetery, Tamaki. Miss Jahn was well known in musical circles, and as she was a member of the Auckland Choral Society she frequently assisted in the concerts given by that body, when her sweet and expressive singing delighted large audiences. Her relatives have widespread aympathy in their bitter affliction Our Mahurangi correspondent writes : — With sorrow ami regret I have to record one of the saddest and most melancholy events that has ever occurred in the annals of our settlement, and that is the funeral of a daughter of Mr. H. Phillips, butcher, Warkworth, and sister of Mr. W. Phillips, of the Dome Valley. The deceased lady was with her husbind and two children on her way to this neighbourhood with the view of settlement in tuis county, as 6he had been in delicate health for some time, and great hopes were entertained that this climate might be of some benefit. A large number of relations are domiciled here, and she looked forward with some delight to seeing so many of her friends, but her hopes were not to be fulfilled, for she died on landing at Wellington, and her remains were forwarded heie for interment, which took place in the Church of England Cemetery on Friday, the 16th November, and 1 need hardly say that the sorrowing relations have the sympathy of the whole settlement.

Mr. Edward Hall, who arrived in Auckland by tho dismasted ship Bombay, which arrived in Auckland in 1865, and which gave its name to the Bombay settlement, near Drury, died on Nov. lb at his residence, in Newton Road, at the good round age of 74 years. On his arrival in the colony Mr. Hall proceeded with his family to the Bombay Settlement, and took up his land, and commenced farming operations. He remained there for some time, and then took a farm at Cabbage Tree Swamp, near Mount Albert, and from thence he went to Penrose, where he carried on farming up to about twelve months ago. He then felt that old age rendered him somewhat untitted for the active life of farming, and he came to Auckland, and has since resided in one of his own houses in Newton Road. He leaves a wife, and a, son and daughter, both of whom are grown up and married. The funeral took place on Is'ovembor 18 at three o'clock. As has been usual during the last two or three trips of the mail steamers, the Mariposa on her leaving Auckland for Sydney on October 17 took away a dozen lumpers to work the vessel. One of these, named Daniel Driscoll, was taken seriously ill on the day previous to the vessel's arrival in Australia, and died from pneumonia in the Sydney Hospital, whither he was removed. He leaves a widow and children in Auckland, and the agents of the ship generously handed over to tho former the wages which would have been due to Driscoll had he lived to perform his contract by working on the ship till her return to Auckland.

Another old settler has passed away in the person of Mr. Alex. Pollock, of Newmarket, at the ripe age of 78. He it- stated to have arrived in Auckland with the Duchess of Argyle or Jane Gifford division of Scotch settlers.

The funeral of the late Rev. C. Cockerton took place on Nov. 28 at the cemetery at St. John's College, Tamaki. The deceased clergyman, who was in deacon's orders, was only 25 years of age, and cTod of brain fever after a brief illness. He was continuing his theological studies, and at the same time visiting suburban and country districts, and the Hospital and Refuges. Deceased was much esteemed and respected. Mr. William Wilson, one of the early sottlers of Canterbury, died a feu , days aao. at the ripe age oi seventy-tive years.

xvir. Edwin Woon died somewhat suddenly at the Gisborne Hospital on November 14. The deceased gentleman had been a resident of the Poverty Bay district for the last twenty years, and was widely known and respected. Mrs. Green way, another of Russell's oldest residents, parsed away on Nov. 23, and was buried on Nov. 2j. A large number of settlers attended the funeral.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18881203.2.63.9

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 9227, 3 December 1888

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2,980

OBITUARY. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 9227, 3 December 1888

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