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Our cablegrams this morning' state thai - J two more murders have occurred in London of a very horrible character, the victim;, . in each case being a woman. The police, force of the metropolis is apparently utterly* ' /' dumbfounded by these occurrences, no arrests having: been made. It muse be remembered, however, that any criminal working what is known as the " lone hand" - , may pursue a career of- murder in London- s , for years without being discovered except' by accident. The German Government,' very unwisely, as most people will be inclined to think, have decided to prosecute, the publishers of Frederick's' diary, and have arrested Professor Geffeken, who ia . • supposed to have compiled the extracts •*■■•"■ which have appeared. The situation iii ... Zanzibar is growing, worse, and very serious trouble in that quarter appears imminent. The position in the Soudan is becoming very unsatisfactory, and it is nob ' improbable that operations on an extensive scale will have to bo undertaken by the British and Egyptian authorities. ■. ; :<.. 1 ' . ■ ■ '. . " ■ ■■• ' ■ /,'k; ■ The Hon. Shirley W. Baker, Premier of*: 1; r Tonga, returned to Auckland by the s.s.' Richmond yesterday, after paying a visit tot Tonga. '•.■' i •: •• ■' ■ • •• '■■••: . A case of considerable interest to travellers: in tram cars was heard before the Judge o£ the Supreme Court and a jury of four yes-; terday. The claim was laid by Mr. McLeod., for £200 damages for injuries received. Mr.; • , .McLeod was a passenger by an evening' tramcar to Ponsonby in July last, and in j stepping off the car he fell and broke his' : . - leg - The question at issue was narrowed . down to whether or not the car was in' motion when he stepped off it. The evidence was of the most contradictory char* ivcter in some respects, but the jury after a , few minutes' deliberation brought , in a verdict for defendants, for whom judgment was given with costs. ' -• The commissioners appointed to inquire into the circumstances under which certain land at Point Resolution was taken by the Government for defence purposes — Dr. Giles, R.M., and Colonel Roberts—will hold their first sitting at the Harbour Board' office on Friday, at 11 o'clock. The com* mission arrived by mail yesterday, and wa understand that certain persons connected with the matter hare been notified to appear on Friday. - With respect to our Hamilton correspondent's report that it is understood Dr. Laishley will be a candidate for United Waikato at the next election, we have ascertained that Dr. Laishley knows nothing of thd report whatever, has no such intention, and has no idea how any 'such report originated. At the meeting of the Newton Borough Council last evening a satisfactory solution of the difficulty between the Council and ' the Archhill Highway Board as to their . respective contributions for repairing the' Great North Road was arrived at. Hitherto the assessment made by the Council was on the basis -of equal contribution, but the Board failed to see it, and there were no means of compelling them to so contribute. They were willing to pay one-third of the cost, and on that basis the allocation has now been settled by the Council, so that all further ground of difference between the two local bodies is at an end. In a communication to the Newton Borough Council last evening, in reference to the waterworks contract, the borough , engineers, Messrs. Boylan and Lundon,. • notified that Mr. Robert Lundon had retired from the firm, and that in future the style of the firm would be Lundon and Vogau. A discussion arose out of the letter respecting the variation in the weight of the pipes, some of the gauges being 2$ tons over weight, while other gauges were 161 tons light weight.' The contractor, Mr. Archibald, said there was a variation in weight in the manufacture of the pipes, and that in the trade an allowance of 4 per cent, was made- icr. variation. Ultimately it was agreed to pay : the contractor for the over weight, and to ~ deduct for the light weight. Yesterday Major Hume was engaged in inspecting the new gaol works at Mount) Eden. To-day he will pay a visit of inspection to the defence works at Fort Cautley. Yesterday morning the second mate of the s.s. Herald met with a painful accident? while working on the Onehunga wharf. Ik an unguarded moment he got one of his legs in between two trucks, getting it severely bruised. He was afterwards attended to by the Drs. ErEon, and brought into town to his residence in Union-street. . There was no further disturbance or . annoyance of Messrs. Garrett's mefi yesterday, the strikers being desirous first or ■ seeing what will be the outcome of the legal prosecutions instituted against - some of ...v their number by Messrs. Waw man and McCarthy. Some non-union men commenced work yesterday at Messrs. Garrett's factory. No further communication has taken place . between the firm and the Trade and Labour Council. .( The Inspector-General of Schools, the Rev. W.J. Habens, who has been here during the past week in connection with educational and industrial school matters, lett yesterday for the Thames, He is expected ! back to-day. ' ; Now that Pond's new factory in Welles-ley-street West, for the manufacture ol • enamelled butter boxes, approaches com- [ pletion, portions of the machinery in the L old factory in Fort-street are being taken , down, with a view of the gradual transfer ' of the plant to the new premises, ' : whole of the seasoned timber m stock will ; ! be used up at the old factory to save the ' ' trouble of removal. A large_ number ot l I these butter boxes are now being shipper - to the South and to the Australian colonies, , the merits of the patent being now fully ! recognised. ' ' i Among the recent donations to the Free ' ! Public Library is a gift of four volumes of : I " Knowledge," an illustrated magazine for j scicnce. literature, and art, edited by tha j late Mr. Proctor. On Sunday evening the Rev. H.J. Lewis, ' of the Congregational Church,, Newton, delivered an eloquent sermon to young | men, his subject being "Christ's Warrior I Priests," and the text being taken from 1 Psalm ex., 3. The sermon was listened to i with marked attent-on, and at its close the ; rev. gentleman addressed a few words ot | farewell to the members of his church and ! congregation, as he leaves by the.Mararoa on Wednesday to attend the meetings ® Melbourne in connection with the celebration of the Jubilee of Victorian Congregationalists. Mr. Lewis expects tobeabseu for a month. The Rev. Mr. Bray, assistant! pastor ab the Tabernacle, preached his last sern \ on Sunday in * that capacity, the e "S a => | ment having terminated, owing to the , I cessity for retrenchment on the part w church. Mr. Bray will still reroal 2,, , j Auckland as pastor of the Mount ku , | Baptist Church, ' ;

The Schanschieff patent battery, for the I electric lighting of railway trains, has come • under the no bice of Mr. Maxwell, the General Manager of New Zealand Railways, who is making inquiries as to whether it . accomplishes all that is claimed for it, with * a view to seeing whether it could be • adopted on the New, Zealand Railways. It was recently tried in the carriages on one of the lines of the London and South-Western Railway Company, and is stated to have been highly successful. The system of . electric lighting is by means of a primary battery, consisting of a single fluid cell, the elements being carbon and zinc, and the exciting fluid a preparation of basic sulphate of mercury. This mode of lighting is said to be equally handy for lighting factories, mines, &c., and Mr. J. C. Firth has also written to Melbourne concerning it for further particulars. Owing to.an unfortunate hitch at the last moment 5 , there was not such a large audience as usual at the open meeting of the •Progressive League at Robson's Rooms last evening. The chairman (Mr. F. Renshaw) opened with a short speech explaining the subject for debate—Freetrade and Protection, as applied to New Zealand. Mr. West took the Freetrade side, and commenced by admitting that new countries could not compete with old ones, and that if local industries needed fostering they should have bonuses, which need not be continued. He maintained that Protection had ruined the shipping, and had also discouraged labour in America, and that it woulcf do the same in New Zealand. Mr. Farrington, advocating true Protection, claimed that freetrade, though very good in theory, did not work in practice, and that if the Customs was not made to produce the revenue, either land or income would have to do it, and indirect taxation was fairer than direct. Messrs. Macarthy, Calver, Renshaw, Newcombe, and others continued the discussion. Mr. F. J. Moss, stated as his opinion that Freetrade benefited individuals at the expense of the people, and that though for a time a slight rise might bo felt in prices under Protection, no one would object, as the whole country would benefit. Those countries were best .off where the true Democratic principle of " country first and self afterwards" held sway. During the evening Mr. Macarthy recited in a pleasing manner, "Kissing Cup's Race." Mr. Feet gave his opinions of the " Art of Bookkeeping," and Mr. Farrington caused much merriment with a burlesque speech on the subject under discussion. The meeting closed with a hearty vote of thanks to the ladies and other visitors. : There has been quite i:. chapter of acci- ; dents within the last two days. On Sunday i morning the Rev. C. E. Ward got thrown from his horse, while riding in Wellingtonstreet, and had his left arm broken near the elbow. The cause of the accident was the breaking of the saddle-girth. Another accident of a like character occurred about . the same time, to Mr. Joseph Barlow, while riding from Nihotupu Falls. His horse stumbled while crossing a bridge, throwing the rider to the ground, and causing him to suffer some contused wounds about the head and face. Mr. Barlow was taken to the District Hospital to have his injuries attended to, and then proceeded to his residence. Yesterday afternoon an accident happened to the waggon of Mr. Ferguson, farmer, of East Tamaki. He was driving it with , a load of straw down Wellesleystreet, when the breast-strap broke, and the waggon " took charge. In passing the corner of Wellesley and Albert-streets, the wheel came in contact with the lamppost at the premises of the Young Men's Christian Association Rooms, when the vehicle at once capsized. No damage was sustained by either horse or vehicle. The Maori Kin", Tawhiao, took up his residence in May last at Pukekawa, opposite Mercer, on the Waikato River, Since then a considerable extent of land has been ploughed up and fenced. There are three settlements, about a mile distant from each other. Potatoes were planted in the vicinity of these settlements about a month ago, and the ploughing and sowing operations are still being continued. The seed was brought from Whatiwhatihoe, from Maungatautari, and from several other places in the Waikato district. The houses erected in the various settlements are of raupo, and are roofed with nikau. All of them are very commodious, and sanitary measures have been well attended to. The ' tribes who have taken up their residence there are —Ngatimahuta and Ngatiapakura, and other tribes are continually arriving. This land on which Tawhiao and his people are settled is near to Major Te Wheoro's ancient residence of Te Kohekohe. ' The waterpipes received for the Newton Borough waterworks by the contractors, Messrs. T. and S. Morrin and Co., were tested at the City Market by hydraulic Pressure yesterday, in the presence of Mr. Thomas Robson, foreman of works for the borough. The pipes were 3, 4, 5, 6, and 8-inch in diameter, and they were tested up to 285!bs to the inch, although the contract only requires 2601b5, and the working pressure will not exceed 751bs. The borough may, therefore, bo well satisfied that they have a plant equal to all emergencies. The committee of the Mount Eden Rifle Range, met last night, and accepted the tender of Robert Somers, at £10 10s,. for alterations and improvements at the firing points. When these are completed the range will be second to none in the colony. Two of the targets have lately been altered, bo as to point out each shot when marking, thus ensuring greater accuracy in the firing, as mistakes are impossible. Want of funds only prevents the other targets being similarly altered, and we trust to soon see them in the same condition as the other two. The Police Department is putting its best foot foremost in view of the advent of Commissioner Gudgeon. Various alterations and improvements are being effected at the police station, and the painters are busy at work. The authorities can scarcely be accused of reckless expenditure, inasmuch as these are the first repairs and renovations since the police buildings were erected.. Commissioner Gudgeon is expected to arrive to-day by the s.s. Mararoa. Additions are being made to the Auckland Roller Flour Mills, in the shape of a biscuit factory, capable of turning out five tons of biscuits per diem, with all the latest improvements. A new engine of 150-horse power lias just been received from home, which will drive the machinery of the mill and factory. Tinning and blacksmiths' workshops are also to be erected. Mr J. J. Holland, contractor, has made a start with the work. The prospectus of the Moanataiari Goldmining Company is advertised in another folumn, on the terms which we spoke of a tew day/3 ago. There are to be 50,000 shares )f 10s each ; 6d per share is to be paid on application, (id on allotment, and the Balance as required in calls of 6d, at Intervals of not less than one month. The claim comprises 71 acres, 3 roods, and 23 parches, and it has yielded 141, ounces of gold; £121,367 has been paid in dividends. There is a battery of 40 stampers attached to the property. Other essential information in regard to the mine will be found in the prospectus. We give the following extract from the letter of a gentleman of considerable experience in all the colonies :—" What you Bay confirms what has been told me of the depression in Auckland being more severe than in other parts of New I believe, however, the tide is about turning, and you will see better times again before twelve months are over. The extraordinary inflation in Victoria is solely due to the many millions of English money recently poured into Melbourne for investment. Bar gold, • the resources of the colony are inferior to New Zealand, and the exports instead of increasing with the population have actually fallen off during 'he last year or two." • A gentleman in Sydney, formerly resii(e^'n Auckland, writes to a friend here:— ~v e aretold there are thousands of gumai SKers in New Zealand who are not averaging 5s a-day, who would gladly come here; wo will give them 10s a-day, perhaps 12s, with a chance of their earning i or more, a-day for eight hours' work, with constant employment, and military and polios protection, if needed. There are » a men in our pits who earn £1 a-day ;; ior less than three days of eight hours n° r k the week 5 the other three days wey enjoy themselves, and draw their £6 &-week. Any really smart navvy can nearly ®arn this in our mine. It is such easy, clean, pure-air work in a seam such as we nave—in fact, a railway navvy works hard, very hard, as compared with our miners."

[ A well-attended meetingoosf s those in- 1 ".terested in the promotion of the Fancy I > Costume Football Match, to be played on ] Saturday next at Epsom in conjunction i with . the Rugby Union Sports, was held ■ yesterday evening in the Imperial Hotel. , Mr. F. Edwards was voted to the chair, and briefly explained the "plan of cam- I paign'* proposed to be adopted in the j match. Several suggestions were made by . those present, and it was finally decided, on the motion of Mr. G. Osmond, that the match be played according to the ordinary Rugby rules, special latitude to be j allowed to the backs for making diversions ! in keeping with their assumed characters. ! Mr. J. Cooper then submitted several names as a Selection Committee to choose the 1 rival teams of " Iraprobables" and "Im- j possibles " according to the characters re- I presented by the players, and Messrs. ! Fisher, Murray, Cooper, and Osmond were • chosen. The Chairman intimated that fully ! forty players had signified their willingness ! to take part in the match, and that there- i fore they were sure to have full teams, while the Rugby Union had made provision | in their programme for the match, which I was to start at half-past four p.m. A large number of those present gave in the names of the characters which they would endeavour to represent, to the Selection Committee, and the list contained the following incongruous assortment Girl of the Period, Bunthorne, Gobo, Highland Piper, Charlie Hugo, Moss Jewel, "Holy Coppers," Tim Drumgoon ; " Stonebroke," Herr Golpostein, Arabi Pasha, Butterfly Dude, Last of the Mohicans, Californian Digger, Broth of a Boy, Sergeant McGinegan, Father's Darling, Bung Won and Bung Tu (Chinese twins), and many others. The teams are to be picked on Thursday next. The yacht Muritai, so well-known when owned by the late Mr. C. H. Street, of St. George's Bay, and formerly of Dunedin, has just been sold to Mr. Lushington, of Mahurangi, for £450. It appears that both an Auckland and a Wellington gentleman were anxious to secure Tier, but that Mr. Coleman, solicitor, acting for Mr. Lushington, closed the bargain yesterday. It is expected her new owner will take an active part in the yacht races at the annual regatta, and in those of the Auckland Yacht Club when the season arrives. The Muritai has been laid up for some time past, and Mr. E. Sweeney has received instructions to get her fitted up, in order to her being despatched to Mahurangi. Yesterday evening a pleasant musical and dramatic entertainment in connection with St. Barnabas' Church was given in St. Sepulchre's Schoolroom. There was a good attendance, especially of ladies. The first part of the evening's amusement consisted of the immortal Mrs. Jarley's exhibition of waxworks. The dear old lady was assisted by the "phenomenal Continental wonder, Herr Hoofie Tusk," and among the celebrities to which the audience was introduced, were the Egyptian Giant, Robin Hood and Maid Marian, Turveydrop, Gipsy Countess, the Prince and Princess of Wales, and the Babes in the Wood. The characters were excellently got up, and their performances created great merriment among the audience. The second part of the programme consisted of the farce " The Birchington Academy" and a musical medley, introducing in pantomime " Robinson Crusoe : his goods, chattels, and appurtenances, to wit, his aged mother, his pet sheep and parrot, Friday and the Blaekamores." These were all warmly received, and created roars of laughter. An excellent entertainment was brought to a conclusion with "The Prodigal's Return, Parental Gush, Universal Joy," and finally "God Save the Queen." < The steam dredge is at present engaged ' in dredging out the gutter and deepening the water at No. 2 jetty, Quay-street, so as to enable the Union Company's boats, which have occasion to lie there, to get, in and out more easily. At the rink, yesterday, Master Bernard Harrison, the champion boy bicyclist, was practising some of the new fancy tricks j which he will perform at the carnival tomorrow evening, under the supervision of Mr. Salmon, the manager. Whether as a bicyclist or as a skater, the little fellow shows remarkable proficiency for his years. - To-day, at eleven o'clock, Mr. G. Lewis will hold a special sale of furniture and furnishing goons, all in the best of order, and suited to all requirements. The quality of the goods is unusually good. They will be sold without reserve. Intending purchasers should attend early, as the selection is a large ' one. . To-day at noon Mr. Thos. Jackson will begin the large sale of books and stationery in the premises occupied by Mr. E. Wayte, Queen-street. There are over ten thousand volumes of literature of all kinds, novels, travels, ' history, medicine, science, seamanship, theology, handbooks for the farm, garden, trades, &c, besides a vast stock of stationery of all kinds, wall and other maps. There is also a very large quantity of school books, which will be sold in lots to suit teachers and dealers. In the disposal of such a large stock, many good bargains will no doubt be picked up. Messrs. S. Cochrane and Son will offer 2000 volumes of new books by auction to-day at eleven a.m. In another column Mr. C. Hemus, photographer, notifies that his studio is open on Wednesday and Saturday nights from halfps.st six p.m. to ten p.m., in order to take fancy and evening dress portraits by the new notturno process, and that appointments will be made for any night. The novel process of photography by night is likely to become a I popular one. | =' ■ i

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Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 9174, 2 October 1888

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3,540

New Zealand Herald New Zealand Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 9174, 2 October 1888

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