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The leader of the Irish Party has given utterance to his opinions regarding the action of the Pope, and the scope and character of the famous Plan of Campaign. They will not bear very close examination. Mr. Parnell, of course, resents the Pope's interference. He is not a Cotholic, and is, therefore, not bound by the decisions of the Vatican. But great as his influence in Ireland undoubtedly is, it is as nothing compared with the influence of the Church of Rome, and he might as well attempt to push back the Atlantic with Dame Partington's mop, as to destroy the power of the Pope over Irish Catholics. With regard to the Plan of Campaign, Mr. Parnell's utterances are feeble and illogical. Hβ repudiates on behalf of the National League and his own party all responsibility for that system of organised tyranny. He says that he would have opposed it, had he known of its existence before it was given to the world in the official organ of the League and the Irish party. But why did not Mr. Parnell condemn it when it appeared ? And why has he waited until the Pope has done so before declaring his disapproval of it ? The mere fact that he now suggests the adoption of a system of trades-unionism in lieu of the Plan, which is, apparently, to be discarded, is an admission of the injustice and immorality of that notorious instrument, and a justification of the Pope's decree. The condition of the German Emperor is such as to cause great anxiety. His Majesty is rapidly sinking. He is growing weaker and worse, and unless he experiences a change for the better, the end cannot be far off. The Emperor's recuperative powers are great, but they have been severely taxed in the long struggle which he has waged with the fell disease which afflicts him. The disturbed and critical condition of Europe is further shown this morning by the intelligence that the Turkish Government have given orders for the construction ot an immense entrenched camp. We have to make the interesting announcement that Sir George Grey has purchased lot 8, part of the Hurstmere estate at Lake Takapuna, and intends to erect a house there at once. The lot contains

about five acres, and has now upon it some native bush. It has a frontage to the Lake, and to the road which goes round the Lake. Sir George will occupy a situation hardly to be surpassed anywhere for beauty, while he will be within an easy distance of Auckland. He has always manifested a great interest in the beautiful district of Takapuna, with its remarkable lake and its beautiful sea beach.

Our Wellington correspondent telegraphed that Mr. E. Withy, member for Newton, was expected to second the Ad-drese-in-Reply on the opening of Parliament. We have seen Mr. Withy on the subject, and he states that he has had no communication on the subject, and further, that he ehould not do so even if he were naked.

The directors and committee appointed by the shareholders at the last meeting of the Union Sash and Door Company have decided to bring forward a scheme for carrying on the business under new auspices. A meeting of shareholders is convened for noon to-day, at the Chamber of Commerce, Insurance Buildings, to consider the proposals, which will be found in our advertising columns.

The City Council held a formal meeting yesterday (the Mayor presiding) for the purpose of certifying the burgess rolL There were no objections, and the Mayor, in moving that the roll be signed and certified, said that this year there were 6529 burgesses on the roll, and 424 defaulters, and the rates owing were £3148 10s 6d, as against £4343 8s owing last year, so that the city was much better off this year from this point of view. The burgess roll was then formally approved.

The strike of the journeymen tailors has assumed no further developments, and there are about twenty men still "out." They complain greatly of the action of the employers in giving them no notice of the reduction, which has occasioned all the trouble, and state that they do not intend to give way. They have been offered the sympathy and co-operation of their fellowtradesmen in the Southern cities, and also of the Trades and Labour Council. In all other places in New Zealand the price for an hour's work is one shilling, and the recent reduction by the Auckland masters from 10d to 8d is considered by the employes as quite oub of reason.

As Sir George Grey is to leave for W«i lington to-day, he has been unable to com ply with the request that he should delW an address on the.Chinese question. H,Z ever, his views on the question ara so well known that it hardly was required that h should expound them on a public platform With that far-seeing shrewdness which characterises his every action in regard t the colony, Sir George Grey has dealt with this subject more than once. The moab striking instance was on the occasion of the proposal for the federation of the Australian Colonies. Sir George Grey, when address. ing a public meeting at the Theatre Royal opposed such a federation. He pointed ouh that the northern portions of Australia were unfit for Europeans, that inferior races would be attracted there, and mush inevitably spread through the colonies and that therefore New Zealand, being a' land specially adapted for European industry and development, was much better untrammelled by any ties of federation with the Australian colonies. He has not changed his mind on this subject, and is determined that New Zealand should be preserved for the Euro. pean race and its native population. Sir George Grey was in the Public Library u D to a late hour last night, and he intimated to the Mayor before leaving that he i n . tended to make further additions to magnificent gifts by fresh purchases during his projected visit to England. ° A visit to the Avondale Lunatic Asylum was paid on Tuesday last, by Mr. T. Thomnson, M.H.R., accompanied by Mr. R. Stevenson, one of the official visitors of the Asylum. Mr. Thompson was anxious to make himself acquainted with the state of the Asylum and its affairs before proceed. ing to Wellington, as it is anticipated that some matters in regard to it may vise during the Parliamentary session. They found the main building all right, and its arrangements satisfactory. The new portion is complete, so far as the contract is concerned, but it is not yet furnished. It, will add largely to the accommodation required. The farm, under the management) of Mr. Boyd, is all that could be expected and the Auxiliary Asylum is also in perfect order. The cleanliness, discipline, and order observable throughout the whole institution were moat satisfactory, and Mr. Thompson expressed himself well-pleased and satisfied with all that he had seen. The funeral of the late Mr. Joseph Banks took place on Tuesday afternoon, from hia late residence, Sefton, Epsom, and the respect and esteem in which the deceased gentleman was held was manifested by the large and influential concourse which assembled to pay him the last tribute of respect. There was a large attendance in carriages and on foot to follow the remains from Epsom, and the concourse was very largely increased when the funeral reached Newmarket. Mr. A. Buckland, father-in. law of the deceased, and Mr. Joseph Banks, eldest son, were the chief mourners. The coffin was heavily laden with wreaths, bouquets, and immortelles. The funeral service in the church, and at the grave, was impressively read by the Rev. I. Richards, incumbent of St. Mark's, Remuera.

Yesterday evening, about five o'clock, the Auckland representative fifteen held a practice at the Metropolitan Ground, at) which all the players save Conway and Elliott attended, and also fully five hundred spectators. The first work done was passing, which, though on the whole good, frequently erred through throwing forward. Sides were then chosen, and play indulged in for about half an hour. Running was the principal feature of the game, and in this department Madigan and Whiteside did good work, while McCaueland also proved himself to be in good form behind the scrum. The forward play was ao;ain disappointing, though several members showed improved passing. The defect preriously mentioned in the columns of the Herald, of not keeping closely after the ball and waiting offside till it is returned by the backs, was again apparent, though nob in so marked a degree as on Saturday fast. O'Connor and Hobson were conspicuous for general good play, while Twiname showed up once or twice in the open, and Marshall and Keefe did good work in the scrums.

The Baptists of New Zealand are at present supporting two missionaries in East) Bengal. One of these ladies is Miss MeGeorge, of Dunedin, who has well-nigh mastered the language, and will soon bo fullj equipped ; the other is Miss Ncwcombe, a member of the Auckland 'fabernacla Church. The society is about to acquire 01 erect mission premises, and asks the aid 01 all interested, in foreign mission work. Thi offering at Pastor Miiller's missionary service this evening will be devoted to this good cause. Mr. Charles Edward Button, Being the only candidate nominated yesterday for the Mayoralty of the newly-constituted Borough of Birkenhead, the Returning Officer, Mr. Seaman, declared that gentleman duly elected. The nominations for six councillors will take place this day before noon at the Post-office, Birkenhead. We learn that Sir George Grey has purchased for the Auckland Public Library, from a gentleman in Canterbury, five manuscript books of unpublished poems by " Peter Pindar" (Dr. Wolcott). The works of this author were collected and published in four volumes in 1796, and have been frequently republished since. "Peter Pindar" is still quoted and read, and these unpublished poems must be of much value in the literary world. Besides these there is one large volume containing Dr. Wolcott's correspondence with his publishers, and his agreements in reference to the publication of his works.

Ib is not so generally known as It ought to be that Mr. Redgate, the inspector for the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, is a special constable under the Police Offences Act, and hae power to arrest on a charge of cruelty should such an extreme measure be necessary. He has also power to seize horses, vehicles, or other chattels, and in fact exercise all the powers of a constable under this Act. The Wellington Chess Club held their annual meeting in the club-room, Athenffium Hall, on May 4, Mr. C. W. Benbow presiding. Mr. C. L. Barraud, the secretary, brought in his report, which showed the club to be in a very'sound and prosperous condition, and had made exceptionally good progress during the past year. There were now 48 members, 18 of whom had been elected during the year. The balancesheet showed the expenditure for the year to have been £40 14s 3d, while the receipt* were £40 19s 3d, leaving a small credit balance to the club. Messrs. Brook and Co. wrote offering a silver medal to be competed for by the members of the club under certain conditions. The medal is to be won three years in succession before" becomes the property of any member. W offar was accepted with thanks. The following officers were elected for the coming yew:—President, Mr. C. W. Benbow; vice-president, Mr. W. Whittem; secretary and treasurer, Mr. W. Mackay. The Grey River Argus, of April 28. says:—" The Westport Coal Company have. to borrow a phrase from the goldmine craft, 'struck it rich.' In the course oi their underground explorations in ">» part of the mine known as ' the dip, tß ° quality of the coal was found to be niuc" superior to anything known in the raw* previously. It is a jet-coloured, bngJW. hard coal, showing a brilliant face «W» broken. It ignites very freely, and burn* right out without leaving anything mow than a light grey ash behind it. u machinist, who tried a sample supplied oy the courtesy of Mr. Gillies, says it is we best; coal he ever burned ; and it appears w answer as satisfactorily in a grate as in boiler. The exact spot in which, tw» excellent coal has been found is said to w just underneath Rocky Island. The company are to be congratulated an b*™* Found in their mine coal of sucß eupeu« quality for all purposes." A virago named Mary Brown was charged at the Onehunga Police Court, yesterda), with beating her husband, Eli Brown, wrtj a candlestick. The hupband stated in* dence that his spouse wae ill the getting drunk and making violent attach on him. On this occasion she had bloj" out the candle and attacked him in dark, threatening to take his life. evidence showed that she had beeni con victed of larceny, and had been ff**Z to three months' imprisonment, for ■<* > £ ping her husband on the head with a»» She was bound over to keep the pe*»£ three months, herself in £25 and two sureties of £25 each. , A Southern paper records a fair etancMJ fight in the Wangaehu between a»rr and a rabbit. The rabbit was victorious.

The following handicaps have been declared by the handicapper, Mr. J. Martin, for the City Rowing Club's foot races, to be held in the Domain on Saturday afternoon next, in three events of 100 yards, 150 yards, and 220 yards :— J. M. dimming, scratch, scratch, scratch ; H. Goldwater, 3yds, syds, By dg ;J. Last, 4yds, 6yds, 9yds ;T. Taylor, 4yds 6yds, Hyde; T. Murray, 4yds, 7yds, 10yds; J. Evers, 4yds, 7yds, 10yds; J. Orr syds. Byds, 10yds; C. Otto, syds, Bvds 11yds; A. Williamson, 6yds, 9yds, .12yds ; J. B. Evitt, 6yds, 9yds, 12yds; E. 2j Diggens, 6yds, 9yds 13yds ; W. J. Evers, Ms, 10yds, 13yds ; F. W. Liihning, 7yds, jH-ds, 12yds ; A. Duthie, 7yds, 11yds, 14yds; J. Clarkson, 7yds, 10yds, 13yds ; H. McKaughton, 7yds, 12yds, 13yds ; James Wadbam, Byds, 12yds, 14yds ; G. Rowles, Byds, 13yds, 15yds; W. D. Cawkwell, 9yds, 12yds, loyde; A. Smith, 9yds, 12yds, 15yds; D. Slade, 10yds, 14yds, 16yds. The following is the state of Her Majesty' 9 firison, Auckland, for the week ending May Jjtb, ISSS :—On remand, 8 males ; awaiting trial, S males ; boys, 5 ; penal servitude, 44 males, 3 females; hard labour, 99 males, 27 females ; imprisonment, 1 male ; default of bail, 16 males, 2 females ; debtors, ] male; received during , the week. 28 males; discharged, '23 males ; total in prison, 182 males, 32 females. Threshing wheat has nearly been finished in North Canterbury. The railways are now taxed to their utmost carrying and ptorago capacities, and string after string of heavily-loaded drays cover all the roads leading to stations. The Police Court officials say that the time granted by Mr. Baddeley for midday adjournments on tho days on which he occupies the Bench is so short that they have not sufficient time to "get a friendly draw of the pipe," without mentioning the bolting of their lunch. At the meeting of the North Canterbury Board of Education May 3rd, tho question of the Inspectors' salaries was re-opened, end notices of motion were given, one to tho effect that the salaries should be £450, and the other to the effect that they should bo £,iOO, without travelling aliowances.

It is said that in China many of the country people are affected with leprosy, end it is therefore dangerous to eat the eggs which are sold in the markets. The ejiittle of lepers, it appears, is pecked up from the ground by the poultry, which soon become leprous, lay leprous eggs, and go transmit tho contagion.

At the Onehunga Resident Magistrate's Court, yesterday, judgment was given for plaintiff in the case G. Hyatt v. W. Filmore, claim 3s, costs 6s. In the caso of W. Morton v. W. Parks, a judgment summons for £2 3;J, the judgment debtor was ordered to pay 5s a week or five days in default. In the case of F. Givinen v. A. Turner, a claim for 14s 6d, judgment was given for plaintiff for 7s 6d, with costs 6s.

All the newspapers from New Plymouth and Wanganui to the Manawatu district mention a meteor of extraordinary brilliancy which passed across the sky about nine o"clock on the night of the 4th of May. One paper says it travelled in an easterly direction, and "when it burst the sight was one the beauty of which cannot be described." Other descriptions say it lit np the whole country as bright as day, and that it was succeeded by a prolonged reverberation in the ranges. One observer at Poraneanau says it was a " ball of flame as big as a haystack." It struck the earth v : th "a tremendous concussion, and the shock was followed by a booming noise."

The matron of the Lower Refuse acknowledges with thanks a parcel of books from the Ladies Club, Parneil, for the use of the Inmates.

A practical illustration of the waste of pood food in the process of manufacturing intoxicating liquor will be given by Mr. Harding, of Napier, at the Temperance Hall this evening.

Messrs. Pullen and Armitage notify in another column they have succeeded to that well-known business known as Dignan's Horse Bazaar, Albert-street, where they trust to maintain its character for excellence in appointments. From their large plant of horses, carriages, wagonettes, brakes, etc., they are in the best possible position to cater for the wants of the public ; and as their charges are moderate they trust thoir efforts In this respect will be successful.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18880510.2.18

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 9050, 10 May 1888

Word Count
2,952

New Zealand Herald New Zealand Herald, Volume XXV, Issue 9050, 10 May 1888

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