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THE GENERAL ELECTION.

CITY NORTH.

The nominations for the representation of City North took place 011 Saturday at noou, in the City Hall. There were about three hundred persons present Mr. S. Y. Collins, Returning Officer for the electorate, presided, and opened the proceedings by reading the writ for the election, and called upon the electors to nominate candidates.

Mr. J. H. Melton, without making any remarks, contented himself with nominating Mr. Harry Warner Farnall. Mr. Andrkw Otto seconded the nomination. He entered at length into the abases of oar land system in the past, and eulogised Mr. Ballanoe'a scheme of perpetual leasing, whiah was fair to the present generation and that which would succeed it. Sir Robert Stout was the best statesman of the day. (Cheers and hisses.) They should eduoate their children while they bad the chance, for the time was coming when the children would have to commence work at eight and ten years of age to help their parents to earn a livelihood.

Mr. K. C. Bakstow said that " good wine needed no bush," and therefore it was not necessary for a good man to puff or advertise himself, the people knew it. He had been over 40 years in the colony, and had not taken an active part in political life, though even then he assisted at making our laws, but it behoved every oitizan now to do his part, as the colony, on the authority of the Colonial Treasurer, was spend* lug £20,000 a month in excess of revenue. If they in private life did that sort of thing, they would shortly have to make the acquaintance of the Official Assignee. (Laughter.) The great que*tiou now was to whom the electors would trust the reins, whip, and brake—the man who was used to it or a new man ? They knew Mr. Thorap son as a good man on the District Highway Board, the City Council, the Harbour Board, and he was going to go in. (Cheers.) He was not taken up with "fads"—land "fads" or railway " fads" of people running up and down the country cheaply. Englishmen would never be attracted to settle here through perpetual leases. They wanted a freehold, if it was only for the land they were to be buried in. (Laughter.) It gave him great pleasure to propose Mr. Thompson.

Mr. J. J. Holland seconded the nomina tion. Mr. Thompson was interested in City North, and had always done his duty faithfully and fearlessly. What he had done in the past the electors might feel certain ha would do in the future. (Cheers.) Mr. Winks proposed Mr. Samuel Vaile. He would not make a long speeoh, as it was not needed on an occasion like that, and Mr. Valle would sprak for himself. If they wanted "pluck" his man had got it. (Laughter and cheers.) Mr. Alexander Mackie briefly seconded the nomination, Mr. William Hodgk then came forward, and said lie intended to nominate a candidate who was an opponent of one of the most corrupt Governments that ever existed. If his man had his way, he would put the whole Ministry in a vessel, and ship them to Sunday Island. (Laughter.) If the Ministers were to be believed, they could not live on £1250 a year, and travelling allowances of two guineas a day. He saw from the public journals that Sir Julius was able to walk again, and he hoped he would shortly be able to walk out of the country. (Laughter.) It was with muoh pleasure that he now nominated Mr. William Hodge as a fit and proper person to represent them in the General Assembly, as he was honest and true. (Laughter and great cheering, the ruse tickling the electors greatly.) There being no seconder, the Returning Officer called upon the candidates as nominated to address the meeting.

Mr. Faßnall, in doins; so, entered at some length luto the past parliamentary history of the colony. He contended that the Trades and Labour Council had ft right to mako aeleotions of candidates, as they represented labour, an t could return every member if they thought tit to do so. Mr. Thompson said he would state shortly his views. tie did not fill many pages of Hansard, be admitted, but he could say that he had faithfully fulfilled his duty, attended punctually to the business cf the country, and recorded his vote according to his conscience, »nd in the direction which he believed to bo of benefit to the colony and his constituents. As they knew, he was not connected with any syndicates or land "rings," or political rings of any sort, but was free and independent. Ihere were three subjects which would have to be considered in the ensuing session whatever Ministry was in power—retrenchment, settle* ment of the laud, and encouragement to local industries. The present Ministry was a Ministry of expediency. While Sir J. Vogel was a member of it it would never receive his hearty support. The finances of the colony were in a mess, and there must either be retrenchment, further taxation, or a further loan. He believed in retrenchment from the top of the tree downwards. In the defence vote there oould be a large saving made by lopping off ornamental officers and offices ; but he was not prepared to reduce the capitation to volunteers. Mr. Balance's land scheme had done a good work by getting people on the land, and it wafl better to help them there than through the Charitable Hid Board; but it had its points, and he was prepared to give perpetual leases, freeholds, or lands on deferred payments, as the people might desire it. He was prepared to do all he could to foster local industries in a legitimate way, but not " bogus" industries which were not natural to the country. His best services were at their disposal, if they desired to return him to .Parliament again. Mr. Vaile «aid he would not make a long speech, as he would have the opportunity of addressing them uu two occasions before the polliog day. The subjects he would take up would be their future railway policy and education, more especially as affecting the Roman Catholics and private tuition. He would have something to say also on the mining industry and native reserves, of whiob little had been said as yet. With regard to retrenchment, he was in favour of effecting it, not by cutting down the salaries of poorly paid Government officers, many of whom had only £150 a year, but by simplifying the machinery of government, and making two officials do where three were now employed. The proposed railway boards would give no satisfaction, but he saw. a number of fat billets looming out for somebody. If their representatives had been watchful when the public works policy was in full swing—and the public works governed all their politics—they would have seen that the .North Island railway system was being so planned as to converge the traffic on Wellington. J heir representatives should have resisted it, and obtained connection with either Napier or TaranaUi. Mr. Vailo then referred to his railway soheme, and showed how it would aid settlement on the land, and make the railways a source of profit rather than of loss. During next session a section of the House would advocate the selling or leasing of the railways, either of which was the most fatal mistake they could make. Any company would want 7 per cent, for Its money, and the rates would be largely increased instead of diminished. His object in asking the electors to return him was that in Parliament there was a want of men with special knowledge on special subjects. He had studied the railway problem for many years, and he would yield to no man in the House—or out of it for that matter—in a knowledge of it. The Kktuknkno Officer called for a show of hands, winch resulted as follows: — Mr. Vaile ... ... ... 59 Mr. Thompson . .... 49 Mr. Famall ... ... .... 5 A poll was demanded on behalf of the other candidates. PARNELL. The nomination of candidates for the Par* nell electorate took place at noon on Saturday. Captain Thomas presided as Returning Officer. There was a good attendance of the friends and supporters of the candidates. The Returning Officer having read the writ, called on some duly qualified elector to propose a candidate. Captain D. H. McKenzik said he had maoh pleasure in proposing their late member, Mr. F. J. Moss, as a fit and proper person to represent Parnell in the House of Assembly, and in doing so he referred to his long Parliamentary service, and the consistent manner in which he had supported and advanced Liberal views, and the great interest which he had shown in local affairs, Mr. A. Bell seconded the nomination of Mr. Moss, concluding his speech by saying that the absence of Mr. Moss from the House at the present juncture would be a loss to the colony at large, and to Parnell in particular,

Mr. Napkan Pollard proposed Mr. Seymour Thorqe George as a fit and proper person to represent them in the next General Assembly, tie said it had been admitted that Mr. Moss was a supporter of this present Government, and it was their duty to return a member opposed to that Government Mr. Thomas Sklfe seconded the nomination.

Mr. Moss was received with applause, and after a few remarks in answer to Mr. Pollard's observations, he proceeded to explain the reason of his vote in favour of the Government. It was because on that occasion there was an intrigue to stifle protection, and he an an old protectionist would not be a party to it, and thought it a fair opportunity to have the question placed before the oountry. It was also urged against him that he stood alone in the House, but did not Sir G. Grey stand alone. (Cheers.) He assured tbem it was by no means a pleasant position to be thus isolated, but he felt that the policy of both sides was ruinous to the country, and he could not ally himself with either. He explained his vote regarding the women's suffrage. The second reading of the measure had been carried, but it was destroyed by men who voted for the seoond reading, but who feared it might be oarried. He had opposed the measure from the first, for while he acknowledged the intellect of women, they had not the experience nor did he wish that they should have experience of the low motives whioh actuated politics often. It did rot make them batter men and it would not make the women better. Mr. Moss then referred to the reforms in the past effected by the Liberal party* His platform was retrenchment, decentralization, a reduction of the number of members to half the present number, protection to uative industry, and the settlement of the people on the land. As to the Government, ho would oppose the Tory element in it. The proposed reduction of the honorarium was a Tory measure, as it meant a property qualification, and he hoped when he went to Wellington this time, as no doubt he should—(laughter and cheers) —he hoped to suooeed in carrying the remaining plank of the Liberal platform one vote for one man. (Cheers and interruption.) Mr. Gkokqk, who was received with loud cheering, said after a few introductory remarks, that he sought their suffrages as an opponent of the Stout-Vogel Government— (oheers) —and of Vogel in particular he had spoken against. He had said they were both equally bad, and as for Ballance he was a mau of fads, and it was right that they should be turned out of office. He opposed the Ministry because they were extravagant and reckless ; and the vote of want of confidence made the direct issue before the country the question whether the present Ministry should remain in office or not. When the Government was defeated in the House Sir Robert Stout must have gone to the Governor and assured him that although they were defeated in the House yet their policy would receive the support of tho country, for on no other grounds would a dissolution be granted, but at the same time he wrote a letter to the Agent General in London stating that the Government would probably be defeated. (Cheers and interruption.) Then as to Mr. Moss's reason for voting with the Government because of their protectionist policy: why Sir Julius Vogel said twice during the session that the tariff was not for protection bub for revenue purposes, and Mr. Moss voted for it for revenue purposes (Cries of "No," "Yes," and interruption.) Mr. Moss had boas ed of the measures carried by the Liberal party, as if be claimed all the credit for them. Why did not he, Mr. George, rote for them ? They were carried by the Grey Government, of which he was whip, and did he not often have great trouble to whip Mr. Moss into the right lobby. (Loud cheering.) He was always a Liberal, and the only question now before them was were thsy in favour of the present Government or not? ("No.") If they returned Mr. Moss would he vote for the Stout-Vogel Government, or would he not? For himself, he had no fear of the result of this election, for he had the best committee in Auckland. (Cheers.) A number of questions were then pat to Mr, George. Mr. Geohqr Gdird asked Mr. George whether he thought it right for a candidate to go to a man's employer in order to influence his vote. Mr. Gxouqb said he had met Mr. Holland, who he believed was Mr. Guird's employer, and in the course of conversation Mr. Holland told him that Mr. Guird was a voter, but he (Mr. George) replied that he was a Moss supporter. He was in favour of fosteriug local industries, and had given the best proof of it by putting his money into them. (Cheers.) He also explained his remaiks in regard to doing away with the deaf mute asylum. A show of hands wag then called for, and the result was—For Mr. Moss, 18; and for Mr. George, 64. The Returning Officer declared t&e show of hands in favour of Mr. George. Mr. Moss demanded a poll, and moved a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, which was seconded by Mr. George, and carried. The proceedings then terminated. EDEN. The nominations for the Eden electorate took place at Waite's Hall, Mount Eden, at noon on Saturday last. The building was crowded to suffocation, and both candidates were warmly applauded on making their appearance. Mr. M. Niccol, who was Returning Officer for the electorate, road the writ authorising the election, after which he asked for nominations. Mr. H. M. Shepherd then proposed Mr. E. Mitohelson to represent the electors of Eden in the forthcoming Parliament. Mr. Mitohelson had been in Parliament for six years, and had worked hard during his term of office. He denied fl*tly that Mr. Mitohelson had exchanged constituencies with Mr. Dargaville. Mr. Mitohelson had always been honest, and had never been guilty of log rolling. He was a colonial, and his interest was ours, and he had therefore great pleasure in nominating Mr. Mitohelson as a lit aud proper person to represent the district of Eden in Parliament.

Mr. John Bollard seconded the nomination, and also spoke egotistically of Mr. Mitchelion. He hoped they were not going to stultify themselves by putting in a man with Southern sympathies. Great uproar, hisses, and applause.) Mr. John Douglas had much pleasure in proposing Mr. J. A. Connell as their repre* sentative. (Applause and uproar.) Mr. Mitchelson asked his supporters to give Mr. Connell and his supporters a fair hearing.

Mr. Douglas said personally he had a great regard for Mr. Mitchelson, and he was sorry to be opposing him. Although Mr. Connell was a stranger to most of them he had known him for 20 years, and had always found him a good, true, and honourable man. (Applause.) He did not know any man he would more readily trust his business to than Mr. Connell. (Applause.) He hoped that they would place such confidence in him as would put him at the top of the poll. Mr.. Mitahelsoa had left his old seat at Marsden. He should never havo done that (uproar), and he was very sorry indeed that two suoh men should have stood for one seat. He had great pleasure in proposing the nomination of Mr. Connell.

Mr. RoBSRr H. Abbott seconded the nomination, and said the Eden electors would have to go far before they found a better man than Mr. Connell. (Applause.) The reports about Mr. Council's southern connections were utterly untrue, and he hoped the electors would put Mr. Connell in the position he undoubtedly deserved. (Applause.)

As there were no other nominations, Mr. Nicgol invited the candidates to address the meeting. Mr. Mitch elson then addressed the meeting. The electors had a most important duty to perform, and would have to solve a most important question. The candidates in the Eden district were on the same political side, and the electors would, therefore, simply have to choose the best man. The present Government had shown themselves to be utterly incompetent; and if they were turned out, he hoped a Ministry would be formed having the confidence not only of the House but of the colony at large. ' He would faithfully support any new Ministry which would carry out measures he thought necessary for the welfare of the colony. He then referred to his programme, and pledged himself to carry out retrenchment with a firm hand, And reduction of legislative expenditure, to resist further borrowing except for the completion of the North Island Trunk Railway, to foster local and mining industries, to facilitate the settlement of land, reduce the education vote without interfering with the system, to advocate railway reform, anil to do away with the property tax as soon an possible. He referred to Mr, Douglas' remark about his vacating the Marsden seat. When he declined to mutest the Marsden

seat he had no intention of going into public life again, and had induced Mr. Thompson to stand for the district. When he was induced to stnnd for Parliament aijaln he could not go back on his word „ and contest Marsden. That was why he had stood for Eden instead. He had no ambition to serve, and bad nq logrolling to do. If elected he would serve the eleatora faithfully, and to the best of his ability, (Loud applause.) Some questions were then asked and replied to. Mr. Con null addressed the meeting. The pablic had heard him so often that he would confine himself to a few words. He did nut suppose there was an elector in the room who did not know his opinions. The reason they were there that day was that the present Government had been unable to make both ends meet. The issue before the country was whether this deficiency was to be met by increased taxation or by reduction of expenditure. He, if elected, would, go strongly for retrenchment. He would never tell them that protection would be good for the country though he was to lose a thousand elections. (Applause). But he did not intend to go in for freetrade pure and simple. They had fifteen per cent, ad valorem duties, whioh were very consider able promotive duties, but he would not interfere with the existing tariff, and thus injure the present manufacturers. In touching on some protection fallacies, he said he was not iturpiised at any ignorant persons—(loud bices and interruption). He then explained that ha did not use the word in an offensive tense. He meant people ijjno' rant of political ooonotny believing in such fallacies. If the colony could not find markets fos their produce outside the colony then the country una done for. (Applause.) But he firmiy believed in the country. They would yet have millions of exports, whioh would be thoir salvation. Taxing to support industries was a sort of Kilkenny cat business and would not work. He had published his articles of faith and he would adhere faithfully to them. Any man who thought him so base as to support Southern interests if eleoted should not support him at the ballot box, He would represent the people he was living among, and if elected ne would never do anything but faithfully represent the district. He hoped they would return him at the top of the poll. (Loud applause.) A number of questions were then asked, and satisfactorily answered. He upheld the present tariff duties, although they were not freetrade ones, but he would not support any increase in them. He despised the man who wanted eight hours' bills. Ttiey were Anglo-Saxons, aud had to fight their own battles. (Loud applause.) Mr. Niocol then asked for » show of hands for the candidates. The result was 109 for Mr. Mitchsdson, and 53 for Mr. Counell. The announcement wai received with loud applause, and three cheers for Mr. Mitobelson. The candidates then deposited their sureties of £10 each, as required by the new Act.

Mr. Connell demanded a poll, and Mr. Niccoll accordingly announced the time ani various places where the poll would be held.

WAITEMATA.

The nominations of candidates for the representation of the Waitemata seat lu the House of Representatives were received at noon on Saturday, at the Borough Council offices, Devonport. Mr. Thomas Seaman, returning officer, presided, and about eighty electors were present. Mr. SbamaN referred to the honour which had fallen to him in again coming before the electors to ask them to nominate candidates for the seat. Re had no doubt they would ezeroise with oara and judgment the privilege which fell to them as voters. Since the Representation Act had become law, the transfer of a considerable portion of the Waitemata constituency to that of Eden had been effected. They might, however, still feel proud of the high numerical position maintained by the electorate. Mr. Seaman oouoluded by inviting nominations. Mr. E. Bkll proposed Mr. Richard Monk as a fit and propel person to represent the electorate of Waitemata in the House of Representatives, He said Mr. Monk was a well-known business man, and his record was unsullied. It was true that he was not a professional politician, nor a financial genius, but this was au advantage ; for for some years the country had beeu in the hands of professional politicians, and the people must now go in for economy in administration. Mr. Monk was pledged to this, and he had endorsed the aims of the Auckland Financial Reform Association. The nomination was seconded by Mr. W. Buchanan. Mr. D. Gasooione nominated Mr. Reader G. Wood. He referred to the steps taken to bring out that gentleman to contest the seat. It was thought that Mr. Monk would have had a walk-over, and a number of the electors looked about for a person of large political experience and independence, aud who had not an axe to grind. Mr. Wood possessed these qualifications, and had not a black mark against bis name. Mr. LAdEHtM seconded the nomination.

Mr, Monk said that in the spring of last year, on the death of Mr. Hurst, he was induced to come out for the Waitemata seat. He .as in hopes that some person more fitted than he would havo stood ; and had bis present opponent then came out he (Mr. Mouk) would probably have supported him. But when his opponent now offered himself he (the speaker) could not gracefully retire, especially as he believed that his political sentiments were more in accord with those of the electors than Were Mr. Wood's. During his (Mr. Monk's) career as their representative he had done no politioal wrong, and he knew the pttople of Waitemata too well to think that they would whimsically throw him aside. He oontended that 'those who were in sympathy with his opponent six months ajjh must vote for him (the speaker), or not vote at all, and he must therefore have an overwhelming majority on polling day. (Olieera and "no, no.") He would do nis bust for the electors, and would endeavour to secure the politioal reform which the colony required. If bis opponent a policy in Parliament had baen in accordance with the pledges Mr. Wood had made the other day, the colony might not be id the position that it now occupied. Mr. Wood said he would not follow the example of hi* opponent, and abuse him. (Hear, hear.) He had only oome forward at the solicitation of the electors; he fully intended to remain quietly at home, and not interfere with politics at all, but when he was naked by a number of the electors to come out, he thought it his duty to do so. Mr. Monk seemed to know all about the result of the election; he (Mr. Wood) did not. If he (the apeaket) was returned, he would endeavour to do his duty ; if, on the other hand, the electors returned his opponent, nobody would be more satisfied than himself, and tie would again retire to the peaceful seclusion of his own home, to cultivate bis own taetes, satisfied that he was not obliged to re-eater the turmoil of political life. Mr. Wood stated that he would address the electors on Wednesday evening next, at the Devonport Hall. A number of written questions were handed to Mr. Monk,, aud his replies were as follows 1. He had all his life endeavoured to keep wages at a high standard, and he should continue to do his best to supply work for good wages. 2. He would most certainly not advocate the truck system, to which he was quite opposed. 3. He would uot assist to close the qumtields during the summer months. Mr. Monk continued, stat ing that reference had been made to his remarks regardinghisoppouent,but the political situation of the colony was a matter of great momunt, and he (the speaker) could not think of it without some emotion. The Returning Officer read clause 6 of the Electorul Acts Amendment Act, which stipulates that each oandiduie shall deposit £10 with the Returning Officer. Mr. Wood then handed in the required deposit, amidst some applause; and Mr. Seaman announced .that Mr. Monk had already paid him £10. The show of hands gave the following result: — R. Monk... .„ S3 R. G. Wood .... 32 The Returning Officer, having announced the arrangements necessary with respect to the appointment of scrutineers and other matters, the meeting closed with a vote of thanks to Mr. Seaman, proposed by Mr. Monk, and aeoonded by Mr, Wood. MANUKAU. The nomination of candidate! for the Mauukau seat took plaoe At the Courthouse, Onehunga, at noon on Saturday. There were about 120 electors present. Captain Qalbraitb, the Returning Officer, presided, and opened the proceedings in the statutory manner by reading the writ for the election. He then called on some duly Qualified elector to nominate a candidate,

Mr. W. J. Soitkb, Mayor of Newmarket, ■aid he was proud to say he had a fit and proper person to nominate ; it was their late member, Sir G. M. O'Rorke. (Cheers.) For the past 34 years he bad resided in the town, 27 years of which he had protected their interests in the colony's camoaigns. He had belonged to the Provinoial Council in the early days, aoting as Provinoial Secretary ; also librarian to the Provincial Connoil, by which he was enabled to gain useful information for the benefit of the colony. In 1872 he was a member of the Cabinet during the Hon. Waterhouse's Premiership. At that time Sir J. Vogel endeavoured to abolish the Provincial Councils, to enable the colony to borrow more money, and Sir G. M. O'Rorke was opposed to such a course, and protested gaainst it, and leaving his position on the Benches, walked across the House and joined the Opposition. (Cheers.) In recognition of his honesty, his constituents subscribed for a valuable piece of plate, and presented it to him. Tne question was— Would a man be found to do such a thing at present? (i'ries of " >o, no.") Many strong opponents had been brought out to oust Sir Maurice, but on each occasion they were defeated ; and now ag*in an opponent was in the fiald, but only to suffer the same fate as tho others. (Cries of " No, no." »nd "Yes, yea.") He alluded to the various) reserves and favours got by Sir Maurice for the people of Manukau. An important one was the One-tree Hill reserve oi 99 uores of beautiful land. The revenue accruing from that renerve was £200 per annum, which would be devoted to planting it and making it, at no far distant date, a beautiful park. (Cheers.) He bad taken a prominent part in farthering primary And higher education throughout the colony, and had been successful in his undertakings. (Hear, hear.) He (the speaker) differed wita the opinion of many electors that they were disfranchised through the high position Sir G. M O'Rorke had held in Parliament, for numbers of bills were introduced in the name of Sir Maurice* and never failed going through, and when the bills were before the committee, he was present to support them the same as any other person. He was sorry to say that the Onehunga people were quarrelling about their re'serves, presumably through having too many, but if they could not agree how such reserves should be utilised, let tbem be given to Newmarket, and he was sure there would be no disagreement over them. He inclined to think that the other candidate was a mere baby in politics, and he questioned whether there should be an election, as at present the colony was in a very critical position, and resembled & ship in danger, whicn, if manned by young and inexperienced seamen would be lout.

Mr. A leg Robb, in seconding the nomination, mentioned that Hir Maurice had obtained for them the Green Hill reserve, six aores adjoining the Council Chamber, the market reserve, a site on Geddes' Point, Mount Smart endowment, two acres adjoining Bycroft's Springs, the reoreation reserve of 47 acres, One-tree Hill reserve of 99 acres, M#ngere bridge, the lighthouse and telegraph station at Manukau Heads, and also leading lights for crossing the bar. These should speak for the energy of their member and he had no doubt when the electors went to the ballot box they would not forget a faithful servant. (Applause). Mr. Wm Bkikrly proposed Mr. Samuel Smith Osborne as a representative of Manukau. He would not quote what Mr. 0 1 'le had done for Onebuuga, but he had u-jrvr done them any harm. (A voice, "He >evtr got the chance.") Already the country had been brought to the very verge of ruin by old members, and they should be ousted. If the present Government was turned out of power the country would be completely ruined. He then proceeded to criticise the remarks of Mr. Suiter at great length with slight interruptions. Mr. JamksCarr seconded the nomination. The candidates were then called upon to address the meeting. Sir G. M. O'Rokkb came forward amidst applause and said be thanked the Mayor of Newmarket for bis kind remarks, tie had contested twelve elections on that spot without creating any ill-feeling, and he hoped there would be none on the occasion of toe coming contest. A charge had been laid against him. What was that charge? He was too old. He asked his hearers to pronounoe judgment on him if ho had grown too old to attend to their interests. He was aooused ot a orime for being elected for 27 years, bu* his electors were the criminals, for they had on each occasion returned him. They cried, " We want new blood," but it appeared to him it was a governing class of new chums they required, which were to be the saviours of the country. But until they had turned Sir G. Grey, Sir F. Whitaker, and others older than himself out. there was no room for the new chum saviours. He then quoted portions of his opponent's opening address referring to protection v. freetrade, in which he stated, and which was recorded in the New Zealand Hkrald, that he was an out-and-out freetrader, and yet, strange to say, in a few days he issued a manifesto declaring himself either in order to suit electors, which did not correspond with the concluding remarks of the address. He was glad there was such a gulf between their political viewa, as people would have no difficulty in ohoosing between them. He concluded, amidst applause, by bespeaking a patient hearing for his opponent. Mr. Osbounic laid he had oome forward at the wish of 200 elector*, ami not on his own account. He then replied to the remarks of the former speaker, and to the false rumour* put in circulation about him. He touched on the matter of protection, which had been suggested by Sir J. Vogel, and which he contended was only throwing dust in the eyes of the people. He concluded by saying he was there at the wish of the people, and by the people he would be placed at the head of the poll. (Cries of "No, no," and " Yes, yes.' ) The Returning Officer then called for a show of hands, which was taken, with the following result : — Sir G. M. O llorke ... 70 Mr. S. S. Osborne ... ... 40 Mr. O«borne demanded a poll. On the motion of Sir G. M. O'Robke, seconded by Mr. Osbjrne, a vote of thanks was accorded the Returning Officer. WAIKATO. [BY telegraph.— OWN correspondents. ] Cambridge, Saturday. The nomination of oaudidatei for Waikato was held at the Cambridge Courthouse this morning, about 150 electors being present. When the Returning Officer (Mr. «earancke) asked for nominations a laughable incident occurred that completely upset the arrangements of the Russell party. The individual who intended seconding Mr. Russell's nomination was anxious that Mr. Whyte should be tho first to be proposed, and threatened that; if they wore not quick in doing it he would do it himself. Hearing of this the Mayor (Mr. Gwynneth), who is one of Mr. Whyte's staunchest supporter*, immediately nominated Mr. George Warren Russell, and so hoisted them with their own petard, at which they were very wroth. He was seconded by Mr. Clements. Mr. J. B* Whyte was nominated by Mr. J. IS. Clarke, seconded by Mr. T. Cox. The voting was :— Russell, 59 i Whyte, 64. A poll was demanded on Mr, Russell's behalf. MARSDKN. Wangarei, Saturday. At the nomination to-day Mr. J. M. Dargaville and Mr. R. Thompson were nominated. About 300 electors were present. Both candidates gave addresses. During Mr. Thompson's speech Mr. Darvaville jumped on the platform, and called Mr. Thompson "a liar." The crowd hooted, hissed, and groaned, at Mr. JDargaville, and it was feared he would be mobbed. The show of hands gave Dargaville about 40, and Thompson about 260. Mr. Dargaville demanded a poll. Mr. Thompson's return appears certain. TAURANGA. Taukanga, Saturday. The nomination of candidates for the Tauranga electorate took place at noon, a large attendance of electors being present, and much interest being evinced in the proceedings. Mr. Richard John Gill, Opposition candidate, was nominated by Mr. Jonathan Brown, seconded by Mr, Dennis Kennedy ; Captaim Howard Kerr, independent candidate, was nominated by Colonel Dowell, seconded by Mr. Thomas Somerville; Mr. William Kelly, Ministerial candidate, was proposed by Mr. R. C. Jordan, seconded by aJr, W. J. Redmond. The show of hands resulted as follows Kelly, 33; Gill, 24 Kerr, 22. A poll was demanded on behalf of both Mr. Gill and Captain Kerr. .

MR. DARGAVILLB'S RECEPTION AT WHANGAREI. Whang Saturday. Mr. Dargarille held a meeting here to* day at three o'clock; 200 electors were

present. The meeting wu i continuation of interruptions, and broke up amidst uproar. Mr. Dargaville refused to answer question! relating to a matter of what be oallea private business, but the meeting insisted, and Mr. Dargaville left the hall, having been fairly staggered. No vote of thanks or confidence was moved.

FRANKLIN NORTH. Mr. P. La wry addressed the electors on Saturday evening in the old schoolhoute, Otara. There was a very large attendance, the building being crowded, Mr. MoGechie was voted to the chair, and in bis opening remarks gave an interesting res mi of the history of tne colony during his experience as a colonint of 45 years' standing. Mr. Lawry, on rising to address the meeting, was received with applause, and obtained a most attentive hearing. At the close of his address he answered a number of questions. A unanimous vote of thanks for the address, and confidence in him as the future representative of the electorate, was passed with* out dissent. An enthusiastic vote of thanks to the chairman terminated the meeting.

NOMINATIONS TO-DAY. The following nominations will be held to-day in this district:— Newton: St. George's Hall—Hon. Mr. Tola, Mr. E. Withy. Auckland Weft: St. James' Ball—Mr. E. W. Morrison, Mr. J. M. Sheta, Mr. D. Goldie.

Franklin North: Otahuhu, Hall Mr. W. F. Buckland, Mr. F. Lawry. Auokland Central: St. Sepulchre's Sohoolroom— George Grey. The following telegram was reoeived from Sir George by Mr. John King on Saturday af&nrnoon, and it will be read at the nomination to-day : — " Mr. J. King, Insurance Buddings, September 17, 1887. Thanks fur telegram and your oare. Request nominator and seconder to state my great regret a'<: not being present. If electors please to return me all my energies shall be given to promote the welfare of Auckland and the entire colony, and thus to do credit to their choioe."

Mr. Reader Wood addressed the electors at the Wade on Wednesday. Mr. Lloyd in the chair. There was a good attendance. Mr. Jack asked why Mr. Wood had come out in opposition to Mr. Monk, their political ideas being almost the same ? Mr. Wood stated that a number of voters at Uevonport requested him to stand, and his political views agreeing with Mr. Monk's did not disqualify him from standing. Mr. Blake proposed a vote of thanks, Mr. Lord pro» posed a vote of thanks and confidence. The vote of thanks only was carried.

A meeting of Mr. Mitohelton's Avondale committee will be held at the Public Hall, Avondale, this evening, at half-past seven o'clook.

Mr. Moss will address a meeting of Parnell electors At eight o'clock to-night, at St. Andrew's schoolroom, 3ymonds-strest. A meeting of his committee will be held at half-past seven o'olook, before the general meeting takes place. Mr. Connell addressed the Kden electors of Swanson district in the Public Hall, Swanson, on Saturday evening last. There was a crowded attendance. Mr, Wm. Hiett occupied the ohair. Mr. Connell reviewed at length the chief political questions of the day, and after speaking for upwards of two hours, resumed his s«at amidst prolonged applause. A large number of questions were asked and replied to satisfactorily. Mr. A. J. Thomas then moved, and Mr. P. Crawford seconded, a vote of thanks and confidence in Mr. Connell as the future representative for Eden. The ohairman calUd for any amendment, but none was forthcoming. The motion was then put, and carried unanimously, amidst load applause. Three cheers were called for Mr. Connell, and heartily responded to. A vote of thanks to the ohairman, moved by Mr. Connell, brought a most enthusiastic meet* ing to a close. Subsequently a committee meeting was held, Mr. A. Thomas presiding. Mine electors added their namen to thu already strong local committee. Arrangements of a very complete character were made for polling day, and the meeting adjourned at a late hour. Mr. J. A. Council's committee are announced to meet at Waifce's Hall, Mount Kden, and Public Hall, Mount Albert, this (Monday) evening, at half-past seven p.m. Mr. Connell addresses the •leotors of Eden at Point Chevalier to-night. Mr. Robert Thompson addressed about 400 electors at Whaogarei on Friday night. Mr. P. S. Brown, toimerly County chairman, was in the ohair. Mr. Thompson's speech was a repetition of his former ones. At the close, a vote of thanks and confidence was oarrled unanimously amid deafening cheers for the candidate. An amendment of thanks only was proposed, but found no seoonder and lapsed. notwithstanding the inclemency of the weather on Friday night, Mr. Lundon's meeting in the Public Hall, Kawt.kawa, was well attended, and the whole proceedings passed off in a very pleasing manner. Mr. Lundon, after speaking for two hours or so, reoeived a unanimous vote of thanks and confidence.

The electors of Waitemata will be addressed by Mr. Header Wood, at the Devouport Hall, on Wednesday evening, at eight o'clock. Mr. H. T. Garratt will address the electors of Newton in St. George's Hall to-morrow evening, at eight o'clock. A special meeting of Mr. Peacock's committee will be held this evening in the Baptist schoolroom, off Jervois Road. As the business is of importance a full attendance is requested. Two candidates have been returned unopposed to the House of Representatives —viz., Mr. Fergus for Whakatipu, and Mr. R. Reeves for inangahua. The former is an Oppositionist and the latter a Ministerialist. Mr* Fergus has represented the same constituency twice before. He has been a consistent follower of Major Atkinson, but his views are somewhat changed in this respect, and he would not give his support to the continuous Ministry reconstructed. It is generally believed that if the Opposition get into power Mr. Fergus would have the offer of portfolio of works, for which his knowledge of engineering, and experience as a large contractor, are believed to render him peculiarly tic. Mr. Fergus is just in the prime of life, and with his constituents is very popular—knowing almost every man in the district. A majority of the candidates in the Southland district are pledged to introduce the Bible in State schools, and to support local option in the liquor traffic. The temperance party will support Tanner for Inveroargill, Cowan for Hokonui, Macintosh for Mataura, and Froggatt for Awarna. NO CONFIDENCE IN THE GOVERNMENT. THE PREMIER AT NASEBY. Donkdin, Saturday. The Premier spoke at Naseby last night. At the close of bis address a vote of thanks and confidence in the Government was met by an amendment of thanks to the Premier, but no confidence in the Government. The amendment was carried by fully 2to 1. Mr. McKenzie had a discussion with the Premier, lasting till midnight. At the close Mr. MoKenzie received an ovation.

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Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTION., New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIV, Issue 8057, 19 September 1887

Word Count
7,133

THE GENERAL ELECTION. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIV, Issue 8057, 19 September 1887

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