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OBITUARY.

DEATH OF SIR JULIUS VON HAAST. Sir Julius Von HAASS died suddenly at L'hristcburch early on tho 16th August. He was apparently well on August 15, and went in the evening to a lecture at the Philosophical Institute, where he complained of feeling ill. He went home and to jed. A doctor waa called in and prescribed .or him, aud he apparently went to sleep. At tbout half past odo Lady Von Haaet noticed him breathing heavily, and sent for Dr. Symes, bat when he came Sir Julius was dead. He was ti-'J years old. The supposed cause of death was heart disease. This wellkuown geologist, paleontologist, and explorer waa born in 162-1:, at Bonn, Germany. He received his education there, attending the univereity. Later on he resided for some time in Belgium and France, and made extensive travels over Europe, continuing his geological and art studies. In ISSS he came to New Zealand on a scientific mission, joined Professor Hoohetetter, who had arrived in the Novara, and took part in all the labours o£ that distinguished geeJogiat. During 185'J he was engaged on an exploring expedition on behalf of the Provincial Government of Nol* eon. In 1861 he was appointed Government geologist for the province of Canterbury, and in 1866 the Canterbury Museum at Chriatchurch waa founded, of which he waa appointed director, and which be made take i\nt rauk among the museuroa of the Southern Hemisphere. Sir Julius was also Professor of Geology in Canterbury College, Christchurch (the New Zealand University), and a Fellow of the Senate of that University. Early in 1885 the New Zealand Government appointed him Executive Commissioner, to represent the colony, and as Commissioner' in-Charge at the Indian and Colonial Exhibition of 1886. During his stay in England Sir. Juliua received marked attention from the Queen and the Royal Family, owing to his having rendered signal service to Prince Albert while a student at one of- the German Universities. He waa knighted on the occasion of hie visit in recognition of liia services as Commissioner at the .Exhibition. He went to the Continent to vteit the Continental Museums in order to procure specimens for the Canterbury Mnseutu, and returned to Nuw Zealand, as it haa turned out, to die. His son was one cf tb a Canterbury team of footballer*, and

he left Auckland on Aug. 16 by the Rotorua for the South on learning of hie father's death, Sir Julius Von Haast was interred at the Avondale cemetery, Christchurch, on August 20. The funeral was the largest seen there since that of Mr. W. S. Moorhonae. It was attended by the governors, professors, and etudent* of the Canterbury College, the City Council, the Industrial Association, the consuls, the Freemasons, and a large number of citizens. Deceased leaves one daughter and four sons born in New Zealand, one of whom is studying painting at Duseeldorf, and another son by a tormer wife is an officer in the Prussian army.

DEATH OF MR. C. H. STREET. A profound sensation was caueed in Auckland on the morning of the ISth ultimo, when it became known throughout the city that Mr. C. H. Street had died suddenly at his residence, Judge's Bay. Up to a few minutes before his death the deceased gentleman appeared in porfect health. A post-mortem examination disclosed the fact that death was the result ot long-standing aneurism of the heart, the existence ot which was not suspected by the deceased or any of his friends. Mr. Street was an old colonist, having arrived in Otago iu 1553. He was one of the earliest settlers in the Warepa district in that province, one of his nearest neighbours being Mr. Justice Gillies. He afterwards gave up farming, and removed to Dunedin, where bs occupied the position of accountant in the Provincial Treasury. He resigned that ollice in 1559 to join tho late Mr. Robert Gillies, for somo years M.H.R. for Bruce, in business as land and estate agents, under the title of Gillies aud Street. He withdrew from tho busine»s about ten years ago, but his name remained in tho firm, which was afterwards known as Gillies, Street, aud Hislop, Mr. Walter Hislop being admitted as a partner at the time of Mr. Street's retirement. Since giving up business Mr. Street resided in Auckland. He was known throughout the colony as a shrewd aud reliable business man and distinguished for % his rare good sense and kindness of heart/ Although lie refused many invitations to enter public life, he was widely known as one to whom appeals for assistance and advice were not addressed in vain. He was for many years the successful superintendent of the Knox Church Sabbath School in Duuedin. During hie residence in Auckland he was aa enthusiastic supporter of boating, cricket, and football — tho ap< preciation of his sympathy with these mauly exercises being testified by numerous letters to his widow from all tho Auckland clubs. The deceased geutlemau leaves a widow and one daughter, the widow of the late Mr. Robert Gillies, M.U.R. The funeral wae atteuded by a large number of friends aud citizens, who thus manifested their sympathy for the bereaved aud respect for the deceaied.

Another old settler has passed away, namely, Mr. John Kelly, who died somewhat suddenly at the residence cf his son, Mount Albert, at the advanced age of 91. he had spent over a quarter of a ceutury at Epsom, and neighbourhood. Deceased was a native of Dublin.

A Dunedin telegram states that Mr. Jamee Speight, the well-known Dunedin brewer, died suddenly on the 16th August. He paid Auckland a visit not many months ago. Deceased was president of one of the Dunedin Bowling Clubs, and while up here offered a set of handsome bowls to the Newmarket Bowling Club for competition. We regret to have to announce the death of Mrs. Seth Smith, the wife of the Resident Magistrate. The deceased lady, who was only 24 years of ai;e, was the daughter of Mr. Fredk. Larkins, late of this city. The cause of her early death was, we believe, consumption. Our obituary column contains a notice of the death of an old resident in this province —Mrs. Elizabeth Runcimau, late of Papatoetoe (widow of the late Mr. George Ruuciman), who expired on Sept. 4 at her residence, Liverpool-street, at the ripe age of S3 years. Mrs. Rnnclman arrived in Auckland with her husband and family in ISSI, and shortly afterwards took up a farm at Papatoetoe, where they remained until nine years ago, when, on the death of her husband, she came to Auckland, and has since then resided in Liverpool-street, with her two unmarried daughters. She leaves, besides a large circle of friends, four daughters and one son to mourn her death. Two daughters are married, one being the wife of Captain Runcimau, of Waikato, and her sole surviving son is atill in Papatoetoe. Mr. John Macphersou, of Matat», died somewhat suddenly on the 13th August. Another of the old Nova Scotia identities, Cbiriatiana Gann Haswoll, the beloved wife of Mr. Robert Haawell, of Waipu, died on the 17th August, after having suffered a protracted and eevere illness. The deceased was born in Sutherlandshire, Scotland, 55 years ago, and after marriage accompanied her huaband to ISova Scotia, whence the family came to New Zealand ia Mr. Munroe's brig, Gertrude, 30 years ago. The deceased was uniformly estimable in character, aud highly appreciated by all who knew her, for her many amiable qualities, and they teel their lose in sorrowful proportion. She has left btiiind a large number of children, grandchildren, and great grandchildren to grieve with her now forlorn huaband.

The first death at the Waikato Hospital occurred on Aug. 27. Th& patient was Mr. W. Nabbs, late of Alexandra, who suffered from an internal disease, incurable for want of the necessary surgical instrument*, which were not to be procured in the colony, but which Dr. Kenny had ordered from home. Mr. Nabbs was one of the earliest Alexandra settlers, having been a sergeant in the Waikato regiment located in that part of the Waikato district.

Mr. Wyndham Phillips, of Gate Pa, one of the oldest settlers in the Tauranga district, died suddenly a few days ago. For some two ytara he has been suffering from heart disease, and when at dinner ho died in the chair in which he was sitting. The deceased was at one time a lieutenant in the army, and was in the militia in the Maori war.

The Rev. Matena Waiti, a Maori Wealeyan Minister, died at Omawharo, Kaipara, on the 2Gth August, at the early age of 2b. Deceased waa the second son of one of the oldest Maori ministers in connection with the Wesleyan Church, the late Hone VVaiti, and was ordained, with two other young Maori ministers, at the Wesleyan Conference held at Auckland in January last. The loss of the Wesleyan Church in connection with the Maori mission will be much felt, as he was a young man of more than ordinary promise. Mr. Donald Campbell, one of the very first of the Nova Scotian settlers, died at Waipu on the 22nd August, within a few months of eighty years of age. When a youug man, he accompanied three other brothers ana a sister from the Isle of Skye to Cape Breton, where, by energy and enterprise, be quickly established himself in comfortable circumstance!. Some thirty years ago he, with a young family, came to New Zealand in the Gertrude, and settled in Waipu, where prosperity again rewarded his indnstry and perseverance. His character was uniformly upright and amiable to an exceptional degree, aud his last sickness and death strongly illustrated the placid hope and loving resignation of the really true Christian. A Mauugaturoto correspondent states that another old identity has passed away in the person of Mm. Morrow, whoso death took place on the 17th August, after a short illness, at the age of 74. The respect in which she was held was shown by the large number of settlers who attended the funeral.

Mr. Thorby, who arrived in Wellington in March, 1811, died at Karori a few daye ago. He leaves a family of five sona, three daughter, and twentyvtwo grandchildren and great grandchildren. Our Pukekaroro correspondent writes on August 30 :—Another old resident has passed away from our midst, in the person of Mr. Charles Judd. The deceased gentleman was born at Puckridge, in Hertfordshire, Eng» land, in the year 1803. For many years in the old country the deceased followed the pursuits of a farmer, enjoying the blessings and sharing the losses incident to such employment. The advantages offered by the Government of New Zealand 30 years ago proved irresistible to Mr. Judd, whereupon he determined to try his luck in this colony. The old home was broken up, Mr. Judd, with hie wife and family, arriving in Auckland in 1859. Two years afterwards the deceased gentleman settled in Kaiwaka, where, with several members of bis family, he has resided ever since, He died on Monday, the 22nd August, at the ripe age of 84 years. The interment took place on the 24th August, and was attended by many old friends and acquaintances of the deceased gentleman. In our obituary column will be found recorded the death of Mr. John Maxwell, an old colonist, who has passed away at the age of 75. Hβ had been 35 years a settler in Auckland, following agricultural pursuits. He leaves a widow and four grown-up children, tiro eons and two daughters.

Mr. John Paxton H»U, manager of the Adeline mine, Kerangahake, end formerly of the Crown Prince and Alburnia ininee, Thames, and the Tokatea mine, Coromandel, died at eight p.m. on the sth September of what seemed to be cancer in the atomaoh. The deceased gentleman was well known for many years in connection with gold miuing m&ttere at the Thames and Coromandel. where he occupied the position ot mine manager. He was in charge of the Adeline mine, Karangahake, up to the time of hie death. Mr. Hall leaves a widow (second daughter of Mr. W. Wells, of Albert Park) and 6ve ohildren, We understand that his life was insured in the Government Insurance office for £500. On the Bth September an old women named Mrs. Cottam waa found dead in her bed at her residence, Gratto-street, Onehunga. It appears that eho had been in bad health for some considerable time, and the neighbours had been in the habit of visiting her, and accordingly a Mrs. Kelly called that morning to make enquirien, but to her surprise ebe could not get access to the house. She immediately called the assistance of Mr. Goldsbury, who lives cloee by, and accompanied, by Mrs. Higgens, they managed to gain admittance through the window, and found the deceased lying d«ad in her bed. She apparently had passed away quietly in her sleep, beiug in an easy position. Dr. Scott was sent for end was soou in attendance, only to pronouueo life quite extinct. The deceased was highly esteemed by the residents of the town, having lived in the locality for over 35 years. The late William Cottam, the husband of the deceased, was one of the iirst lot of jiausioners that came to the colony. He died about four years ago, aud strange to say. he also was found dead in his bed. Mr. James Res ton, late chief gaoler at Lytteltou, died on August '29 agad 72, Captain J. F. Russell, marine surveyor to the Underwriters' Association, Duuedin, died on the 30th August. Deceased, who arrived here before tho gold rush, was the owner of ships in Victoria. Ho held the position of Lloyd's surveyor for many years. Mr. Henry Churton, ono of the oldest resi« dents at Waugaauf, died on September 1. He was the founder of the college for educating Maoris, and some years ago, at the time of the war, was instrumental in procuring from the House of Commons compensation for losses to the settlers by the Maoris.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18870912.2.35.6

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIV, Issue 8051, 12 September 1887, Page 2 (Supplement)

Word Count
2,348

OBITUARY. New Zealand Herald, Volume XXIV, Issue 8051, 12 September 1887