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Several interesting items will be found in our cable news this morning. The report that Russia had waived her claim to the Zulfikar Pass is confirmed by the St. Peters, burg correspondent of the New York Herald. The dispute which has arisen between Spain and Germany in regard to the Caroline Islands io beginning to assume a threatening aspect. Great excitement prevails in Spain, and thp diplomatic tension between the two countries is so great that an open rapture is provable. The death of Sir H. St. George Jrd, formerly Governor of Western Australia, is announced. The English hop crop is expected to be a comparatfve failure.

The ordinary meeting of the Harbour Board will take place to-morrow (Tuesday), at half-past two p.m. Amongst other business tenders will be received for (1) repairs to outer western tee, Queen-street Wharf; (2) repairs to decking, Queen-street Wharf; and (3) for travelling crane.

Among the passengers by the Rotoru* yesterday from Dunedin were Bishop Neville and the Rev. Mr. Kirkham. They proceed by the Jsnet Nicoll to the Islands. His Lordship preached at St. Sepulchre's yesterday evening, to a large congregation. They are staying at Oram's hotel.

At the regular meeting of the Auckland Institute to-night, a paper will be read by Dr. J. Murray Moore on the Sphygmograph, illustrated by photographs of pulse tracings ; and Mr. J. Martin, F.G.S., will give a lecture and photographic illustrations of pre-hi«torio weapons, tools, etc.

How it is possible in Parliament to prevent the remedying of an injustice may be seen in the following paragraph, which we quote from the Thames Star:—"Mr. W. Fraser, M.H.R. telegraphed to-day to the effect that he had succeeded in getting an attempt to give Monday's sitting for private members business negatived, and thus he thought that the Spencer Bill had little chance of being put through successfully this session."

A meeting of the Auckland Bowling and Lawn Tennis Club was held on Saturday evening, at the Waitemata Hotel, when the trophies won during the past season were presented by His Worship the Mayor (Mr. W. R. Waddel) to the successful competitors. Touching reference was made to the decease of the late Mr. Thomas Macffarlane, for so many years President of the club, by the Mayor, the Secretary, Mr. Tait, and Mr. Andrew Bell. The Mayor of Christchurch (Mr. Hulbert), was among the visitor* at the reunion. He was formerly resident in Auckland, fourteen years ago. In acknowledging the toast of his health, while complimenting the Mayor on the growth of the city, he took occasion to have a sly rap at the state of our streets, which were not so clean as those of Christchurch, but he supposed their hilly character, and the consequent increased expense had possibly something to do with it. Mayor Waddel is never at a loss for a repartee, and, amidst roars of laughter, he interjected, that " Christchurch would be none the worse for a hill or two round it." Mr. Waddel is per fectly correct, as the following Parliamentary episode will show :—Many years ago, Mr. (now Sir William) Fox had his attention attracted in the General Assembly to the peculiar habit Mr. (now Sir John) Hall had of raising himself on his tiptoes at intervals, in addressing the House, when he desired to be particularly emphatic. Mr. Fox, during the course of the debate, referred to the matter, and expressed his belief "that the hon. member was either extracting his ideas out of his boots, or acquired the habit through craning bis neck over the Canterbury Plains in an endeavour to find his sheep !" A detailed report of the meeting will be found elsewhere.

The anniversary services of the Ponsonby Baptist Church were held yesterday. The Rev. Thomas Spurgeon preached in the morning, taking for his text, Ezekiel chap. 34, v. 26, "And I will make them and the places round about my hill a blessing ; and I will cause the shower to come down in his season ; there shall be showers ef blessing.'' In the evening the Rev. A. J. Smith was to have preached, but was unable through indisposition, and the pastor, the Rev. J. H. Jones, took the engagement, delivering a discourse from the passage, " He that hath ears to hear, let him hear." There were large congregations at both services, and the collections liberal. The usual soiree will take place to-morrow evening (Tuesday) at halfpast six, when addrebses will be delivered by the Revs. J. Robertson, M.A., Thomas Spurgeon, J. H. Jones, and Messrs. Sbalders, Griffiths, and Bram6.

Our Hamilton correspondent, telegraphing on Saturday, says Mr. W. A. Graham, who returned to Waikato to-day, had an interview with Mr. Banks, of the Freezing Company, when in Auckland, and learne definitely from that gentleman that the Auckland Freezing Company have no intention whatever of erecting slaughtering yards in Waikato, or of starting a meat tinning company there. At the same time » er ® exists no feeling of jealousy, and instead or the interests of their tinning factory clashing with a Waikato factory, the two, Mr. Banks thinks, might work amicably and prohtaoiv together.

""The Auatralian^iT^ 11 »™" d a ' San Francisco by the steamship Australia on Sunday, July 12. »« despatched to New York in the fastest time on record. The steamship was docked at a quarter-past two d «•?, and the several waggon loads of mail were on board the overland tram S a quarter-past three p.m. the tram having he en delayed fifteen minutes to permit the feat being accomplished. The mail reached Sew York en Saturday, July IS and England on Saturday, July '25. The brass twelve-pounder on board the Australia exploded as the salute on entering the harbour of San Francisco was being fired. Fortunately no one was hurt.

A letter has been received by a gentleman in San Francisco from Colonel James P. Maxwell, present Lord Farnham in the County of Cavan, Ireland, in relation to statements made in American newspapers, connecting Walter H. Lennox-Maxwell, the St. Louis murderer, with that ancient and honourable family. Under dato July S'-h, Colonel Maxwell writes : "In reply to your extraoidinary inquiry, I beg to state that my late brother, Somerset R. Maxwell (Lord Farnham), died on the 4th June, ISS4, without issue. He was twice married, but had no children, and died a widower. So much for the correctness of Mr. Richard Owen's statement contained in the catting from the San Francisco papers of April loth enclosed in your letter. As to the individual supposed to be the perpetrator of the St. Louis crime, and said to bear the name Walter H. Lennox Maxwell, I have to state that the existence of such a person is unknown to Lord Farnham or any of his family."

The Rev. G. B. Monro, of St. Luke's, Remuera, preached the call of St. David's Church vacant yesterday morning. There was a very large congregation, the building being filled. Mr. Monro took his text from John xi., 11. "Our true Lazareth sleepeth." At the clo->e he made a very feeling reference to the late Rev. T. McKenzie Frasor.

Mr. Gerald Massey delivered his closiug lecture at the Opera House la*t night. There was a large attendance, although the house was not so crowded as on previous occasions. The subject of the lecture was, "A page from the book of my life." It, had mainly reference to his observations of the phenomena of Spiritualism, and the causes which led to his belief in it after a thorough and searching investigation.

A singular incident took place on Saturday night. A settler was ruling a young horse, when in a fit of stubbornness he refused to budge an inch. The chance for the larrikins of getting sport was too good to be lost. In five minutes a mob of several hundreds cf people bad surrounded the animal, hooting and yelling till the poor brute was beside itself. At last they commenced to shove it along amid tho protestations of the rider, and at last the police interfered, and made a lane for horse and rider to escape from their tormentors.

Constable Coughlan, of Kawakawa, telegraphs to Inspector Kiely, that the rumoured disturbance at the native settlement cf Waiomio. was only a dispute between two natives about land, which is deferred till the 31st instant, and will be arranged by arbitration.

Professor Baldwin will give another of his amusing spiritualistic mind-reading and clairvoyant exhibitions this evening at the Devonport Hall.

On enquiry at the Hospital last evening, the man Whitman, brought in from Rotorua, Was stated to be in a precarious state. Mrs. Wakeham is progressing favourably.

The Sunday evening service in the Theatre Royal was largely attended, Mr. T. Buddie, Hon. Sec. Young Men's Christian Association, presided. The Rev. J. S. Hill delivered a stirring address, taking for his subject " Seek out the old paths."

The special address in the Young Men's Christian Association Rooms, on "Some evidences of the Resurrection," yesterday afternoon, was largely rttended. The Rev. J. S. Hill delivered a lengthy address, which ■was attentively listened to. Various questions were asked and satisfactorily answered by the rev. gentleman. The interest in these meetings is increasing.

The wrestling match between W. S. of Auckland, and J. Reany, of Dunedm, for the championship, and a stake of £100, came off in the Lorne-etreet Hall, belore about 400 people, on Saturday night, and resulted in an easy win for Fagan by Jive falls to two. The conditions were Cumberland style, and the winner of the first five in nine falls to be the victor. Fagan won the first three, and Reany the .fourth, when several were declared no falls. The fifth was won by Reany, and the sixth and seventh by Fagan. At the close the ■victor said he would not wrestle again for money, hut would do so for sport or a cup. The stakes were paid over during the even ing at Bairett's Nevada Hotel.

The following prisoners were in the

1 .l ; ce cells last night John Kelly, for being drunk and using obscene language : i lleD McGarry and John McGarry with having insufficient means of support, and their daughter, Bridget McGarry, with using obscene language ; James Mooney and John Jones, two boys, on charges of larceny ; ¥roily Diver, for stealing a silver ring from {Varies Curtis ; Louis Lumterg, for de<ertio> from the German ship Katharine ; and one man for drunkenness.

Mr. Revell, furnisher, of Hobson-street, writes to say that he is not the defendant in the case Whitney v. Re veil, heard at the last sitting of the Supreme Court.

A sale of work, or fancy fair, in aid of the building fund of the new Jewish Synagogue, P/inces-street, which is now almost completed, will be opened in the south anteroom of the Choral Hail to-morrow afternoon. The ladies of the Hebrew congregation and their friends have for some time past heen busily engaged in preparing for the sale. All the goods will be marked at most reasonable prices, and a speedy clearance is anticipated.

On Tuesday last, at Bombay, the Rev. J. 8. Hill, from Auckland, gave a very pleasing and interesting limelight entertainment in connection with the Rev. P. S. fsinalltield's evening class, in the Public Rail. The hall was crowded. Mr. Smallfield, in a lew remarks, introduced Mr. Hill. He also read a statement of accounts of last lecture. Mr. Rill explained the views he was about to show, and that as there were a good many of them, he would not have time to say much about each picture. The first part of the entertainment was scenes irom Picken'a " Old Curiosity Shop " aud " Life of Little Nell," followed with views in Northwest Europe, of the principal buildings in London and cathedrals of England, and scenes in Scotland and Ireland. He then threw on the sheet one of the hymns from Sankey's collection, which the audience sang. This was followed by a number of New Zealand views, the pictures of Cruickshauk's " History of the Bottle," and scenes from " The Story of Jessica's First Prayer." The last picture was that of Her Most Gracious Majesty the Queen. A collection was made in aid of the Harmonium Fund, amounting to a little over two pounds. lir. Allison moved a hearty vote of thanks So Mr. Hill for his very interesting enter•!>inment. The vote was carried with accla- . nation. The Ohinemuri correspondent of tho Thames Advertiser writes :—" During tho last week our mining population has been considerably increased, and several of the leases lately taken up hare been manned, in accordance with the views of the Mining Inspector, Mr. J. M. McLaren. If all the claims taken up at Karangahake are to be dealt with in like manner, we shall have at least 500 miners working there within the ensuing three months."

Reports of football matches on Saturday are held over till to-morrow.

The Salvationists can be scarcely congratulated on the arrangements for keeping order at their meetings in thj Barracks. Last evening the Auckland hoodlum was at his best, and two or three semi-drunken men who got into the meeting, were permitted to annoy some 600 respectable people (who had come to hear Marshal Booth) without let or hindrance, and practically took charge. Marshal Booth at the close of liia second addiess was fairly stamped down by this handful of rowdies, none of the officers appearing to have either the presence of mind or force of character to deal with the emergency. The Marshal, in referring to the matter, contrasted the conduct of Swiss and French audiences, whom he had addressed, with the conduct of these youths, and the contrast drawn was anything but complimentary to the Auckland larrikins. It is to be hoped that better arrangements will be made to-night, as many people left the ball last night grieved and disgusted at the non-enforcemeut of order in a place of worship, and daring the progress of religious exercises.

It appears, on further enquiry, that on telephone message was sent from the Asylum to the police station, informing the police authorities of Gschnell having committod suicide ; consequently they were not aware of the occurrence officially till the next morning. As the lock up keeper, Constable McConnell, had been blamed for neglecting to report a telephone message, it is due to that officer to state that ho has been found wholly innocent of the imputation.

The s.s. Rotorua, which arrived early yesterday morning from Southern ports at "the Manukau, left again at eight a.m. for the same ports, having on board the English mail received per P.M. s.s. Australia. During last night she would reach New Plymouth, and early this morning should arrive at Wellington, and at l.yttelton in time to catch the train for Duaedin morrow morning.

A private letter from London by the mail states that the Hon. James Williamson had quite recovered from his illness.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18850824.2.15

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 7414, 24 August 1885

Word Count
2,481

New Zealand Herald New Zealand Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 7414, 24 August 1885

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