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The break-down in the International Con. ference respecting the affairs of Emt* appears to be welcome news to the people ot Britain. The Government now propose t> take some important step in relation to the affairs of Egypt, the nature of which h*j not been disclosed. A credit vote is to be pro. poaed to moet the expense of an expeditioa for the relief of General Gordon and the garriion at Khartoum if that atep should be deemed necessary.

The question of Australasian federation, it will ba seen by our cablegrams, is receir. ing some consideration by the Imperii! Parliament. Mr. Gladstone is said to be willing to propose an Australasian Federation Enabling Bill, if it is not likely to b» opposed, bat it is stated thtt the Cos', servatives have not agreed to assent to the proposal this session. Whether any further steps will be taken ia the matter remains to be seen.

The negotiations between Prance ui China respecting the indemnity charged for the Langson affair, have come to an end. France hea refused the sum offered by Chiia, and apparently China is not prepared to make another offer. It is stated that the French Admiral is preparing to nuke 12 attack upon some of the Chinese ports. The relations between the two coon trie* wen never more delicate than at present, and tb* peace between them may be broken at any moment.

The Auckland members of the Genenl Assembly left by the Hinemoa yesterday in order to he present at tlm opening of the House on Thursday. The following gentlemen were passengers :—Hon. P. Dignu, Hon. T. Henderson, Sir G. IT. O'Rorke, Messrs. Moat, Hamlin, Bnckland, Hobbi, Morris, Moss, Peacock, Fraser, Thompson, Tole, Lake, Whyte. M.JELR.s; Mtsra. Leys, Geddis, Berry, jon., Kinsella, Sherrin, Douglas, and Spragg. Most of those going by the steamer left Auckland by a special train at three o'clock. The Hinemoa wu moored in the stream, as the tide had not flowed sufficiently to enable her to come alongside the wharf. Captain Fairchild had gone into the stream for the pnrpose of enabling him to leave as early as possible, so as to clear the bar before the daylight faded. The passengers were taken off to the Hinemoa by the steam-tender Manukan.

In another coltunn will be found aa account of the annual report of the director! of the New Zealand Shipping Company, from which it will be seen that the company propose to pay a good dividend; and it will be satisfactory to learn that the basinesa in connection with the company's direct steamers hats been highly satisfactory. Towardi the end of the balance-sheet there appean to be soma ccnftision in the telegram, which, owing to the latent sa of the hoar at which it was received, prevented' the possibility of a rectification by having it repeated from Christohurch.

The fortnightly meeting of the Harbour Board was held yesterday afternoon, bni the business possessed few features of importance beyond the ordinary routine. An application for the remission of dock daei on the barque Flora, which came into port in distress, wu refused, >9 although in cases of this sort barboor dnea are remitted, there is no prorisioa for remitting dock dues. It was determined on the report of the Works and Tariff Committee to abolish a nuisance which hai bees experienced by Northooto residents, sad instruct the Harbourmaster to enforce the time-table. It waj also agreed to form * fascine embankment at the B»j intake eo as to collect sOt, Ac., and help to form the reclamation. A proposal in regard to Freeman's Bay was deferred for estimates and specifications. Perbaps the most important matter which came before the Board was that contained in the minata of a special meeting containing suggestions and alterations in the sew Barbour Board Bit). We publish the minutes of this meeting in eztemo in oar utual report of the Board' - proceedings, and we have no doubt they will be perused with great interest by all who are interested in the managemest of our harbeur.

The Supreme Coart was occupied yerter* day up to the time of rising, in hearing a case which had bero partly heard on the previous day. It was a claim for £487, preferred by Mr. Merrick, a storekeeper, agauxt the Patetere and Knranni Land Company, for goods and stores supplied to natives on the order of the company or it* servant. Tfct defenoe was that Mr. Campbell, by vbta the order had -been given, had not th» authority of the company. Mr. Hugh Campbell (Rnasell and Campbell), appeared for tbt plaintiff; and Mr. E. Heskath (Hesketh aid Kicfcuond), instructed by Mr. James BaneS (Jackson and SnsscJl), appeared for the defence. After a very careful and patient hearing of the evidence of a large number <f witnesses, and the arguments of counsel ca both sides, His Honor gave judgment f® the plaintiff for the full amount of dais, and costs on the middle scale.

An inquest will take place to-day at ballput two o'clock, at Mr. Keay's resides#, Epsom, on the body o£ the yonDg roan J. Barlow, who was accidentally killed on the Onehunga-road on Monday evening, 67 coming Into cob tact, while riding, with » dray laden with spars. We have ascertained some farther particulars concerning the no fortunate Mo. Gill, a ' whose reaide&ce, Ponsonby, he Icdge4, st»te» that deceased had been staying at her plf 6B for some fear months. He had been working aa • carptnter <vith Mr. Hind. On Monday he went to his work, but retimed home, saying it waa his birthday—his twentieth— and he would go oat to Onekanga. I Smith, a fellow-lodger, states tb.it dec *£y arrived in the colony by the lonic, »t W«liogtoo, on the 9th of Movember, 18S3. waa "» remittance man " from Home, ana well connected. His father and mother aw both dead, and in England be had residing with hi* stepfather, Mr. Char"* Taynor, Conniston h School I*°®; Waikworth. Deceased waa going home cn attaining his majority, as he was coming » for a lot of property. He had been " Nelson and Blenheim previously to co® l "* to Auckland. Mr. Smith is acquainted WJ deceased's friends, and will take chsrgp the body of deceased, and see to the fan*** 1 arrangements. The want of Justice* at the Police it would appear, is still unremedied. terday the Court was delayed nearly an fc<>« «fter partly going through the charge en«j» Mr. Smith having to leave for the ThamesWorship the Mayor and Mr. D. B. McDo***® were at last brought in. and s»* for the mainder of' the cases. It would ieem . the rota of .attendance resolved on at u»» meeting of Jaaticea of the Peace the other o»/ has sot beea acted upon.

Th» f» ;l steamer Zealandia, on the next outward trip, will call at tbe Navigator Islands on her way to Honolulu and San Francisco. It appear* the Samoan Government have aaked that this might be so, and the Sew Zealand and New South Wales Governments have agreed. The arrangemeat come to will not cause the steamer to be delayed more than six to ten minutes, and will not > a aa y way affect the timetable. As the steamer passes through the Diwage between Upolu and Tatnila, the Samoan Government will have a schooner cruising there when the steamer is expected. On the steamer being sighted, the schooner -rill come alongside, and have the mails put jn board, after which tbe steamer will proceed on her voyage.

Mr. C. W. Adams, tbe Government Geodeiical Surveyor, who has just completed the work in connection with the transit of Venus, necessary to determine the correct longitude of New Zealand, oameto Auckland in the Hioemoa, to carry on a series of observations, already commenced at Mount Cook observatory, Wellington, for determining the correct latitude of the colony and thr. true meridian. These will occupy several weeks in Auckland, and further observations will have to be taken at the Bay of Islands, Tauraoga, Gisborne, Napier, and other places on the East Coast, as well as at various stations on the West Coast. The Surrey Department yesterday obtained permissive from tbe city authorities to erect a building for purposes of astronomical observation in the Domain, at tbe site of the station used by the American Venus Transit party. Mr. Adams will take up his quarters there for the purpose of making observations.

Wi Pere, who has juat been elected for the East Coast Maori District (says the Napier Telegraph) is a half-caste, being the son of Tommy Albert, the first European settler In Poverty Bay. Albert was drowned in 1866. Wi Pere is of a very dark oomplexion, and, thongh only a haif-breed, is in disposition and taste a Maori of the Maoris. He is said to entertain an intense hatred of ths pakeha, and his alleged connection with the Te Kooti troubles in 1868 has made him a most unpopular man amongst the old settlors. His knowledge of English is vrry limited, but he i> quite an orator in tbe Maori language.

The Hon. Treasurer of the Orphan Home acknowledges the receipt of £10 from Mr. F. Hull, handed to him by the National Bank of New Zealand, to be devoted to charity at his discretion. We understand this sum has been paid in settlement of a contemplated action against the bank for injury done through the dishonouriog of a bill, owing to an error on the part of one of the clerks of the bank.

At about four o'clock yesterday afternoon, a horse attached to one of the carts of the Auckland Forwarding and Parcels Delivery Company, when being backed into Messrs. Adam Laybourn's store, in Durham-street West, from faulty backing, fell and broke the shaft of the vehicle, precipitating the contents, consisting of oats, into the mud.

Tb» usual winter triat given by the congregation of St. Paul's Church to the Sun-day-School children took place last evening in "tna St. Paul's schoot-rcom. There were CoO children present, and a numbf of their parents and friends. A bountiful tea was provided for tho children, after which the more intellectual portion nf tho evening's entertainment commenced. The Rev. C. M. Nelson presided. The programme was as follows :—Tableaux, in three parts, " Binebeard song. " Moriarty. the Bobby," by an amateur policeman; sang, " Buy » Brconj," by a lady ; tableaux, in three parts, " Rfd Hiding Hoodcharacter song, •' What Can the Matter Be" (with bassoon accompaniment), by an aged lady ; Scotch song, " Farewell My Friends," by a gentlemm : soog, " Aches and Pains," by a decrepid old gentleman ; song, " Dinah Doe," by a negro Udy ; recitation, " Battle of Tel el Kbebir," by a gentlemen who was present at the action ; character song, " Kobinson Crusoe," by a lady ; tableaux, ia three parts, "Cinderella." "Aula Lang Syne" and the National Anthem brought the entertainment to a close, all departing pleased with their jvening's enjoyment.

Mr. Jenkinson's t&nder for the erection of Judge Smith's new residence has been accepted, on the recommendation of Mr. Smith, architect, althongh it was not the lowest. Doubtless, on account of the satisfaction he had given in such large contracts as the Pa Farm mansion, the addi*3ons to the Lunatic Asylum, and other extensive contracts, Mr. Smith had no hesitation in recommending the acceptance of Mr. Jenkinson's tender.

It was stated in a report recently presented to the General Assembly of the Church of Scotland that among the applications for admission to the status of an ordained minister of the Church of Scotland was one from the Rev. G. M. R. Browne, D.D., a priest of the Roman Catholic Church. The gentleman in question was for ten years Vice-Rector and Professor of Metaphysics. Theology, and .Ecclesiastical History in the Millhill Missionary College, London. For a short interval during that time he was superintendent in the field of the priests who went through the Afghanistaa campaign with the British army.—Dr. Browne having marched with General Roberts to Candahar.

A dividend of 40s per share h» been made to the shareholders in the Union Bank of Australia. This dividend is now payable to the colonial shareholders.

Mr. Hales, District Engineer, intends shortly inspecting the section of the Auckland tramway already completed. It appears, however, that according to the Ac: the Governor has to officially appoint the Inspector, and when the appointment is made, no doubt Mr. Hales will be in a position to grant the usual certificate.

The two cases of embezzlement brought by Froftssor KUis against his late traveller, Gearge H. Brandis, were heard at the Police Court yesterday, before His Worship the Mayor and Mr. D. B. McDonald, J.P.'s. The tccused conducted his own defence, and was fined 40s and costs, and ordered to pay the {.mounts, £1 7s 6d and £1 13s 6d, less commission, or in default, fourteen days' imprisonment.

At the declaration of the poll for Wairarapa South. Mr. Bunny said he was the representative of the European constituency, and had been beaten by the Maori vote, which had been obtained by bribery and corruption.

The building trade seems to be cutting it very fine just now. Yesterday Mr. E. Bartley, architect, received seventeen tenders for the erection of four cottages at Newmarket. Three are four roomed, and one of two rooms, all under one roof. The highest tender was that of Mr. Richardson, £597, and the lowent that of Mr. Holmes, £375.

The annual meeting of tbe members of the Takapuna Jockey Club takes place at tbe Flagstaff Hotel, North Shore on Friday avecing next.

Referring to the departure of Mr. T. Rracken from Danedin, the Otago Daily Times says :—" It is not only by bit talent as a poet tha'; Mr. Bracken has reflected honour on this community. As a journalist hi« witty and vigorona pen has been a potent influence amongst u>, and if we assert that he has done Dunedin more service than he has afforded it amusement, it is not because <e appreciate ' Paddy Murphy' less, but Mr. Bracken more. iSven through tbe heat of *he recent contest it was noticeable that no opponent could be bitter to him, and that •ul were obliged to recognise that he had 'lone his best in the House for his conitituente, his province, and the colony,"

Commenting on the action of the teachers of Auckland schools giving a half-holiday on polling day the Waoganui Chronicle says :— " To stop all business on polling day would be to nullify to a large extent the provisions which the Legislature has imposed for tbe quiet »a 4 peaceful carrying oat of the elections. . hitever argument might be advanced in •«vcur of allowing electors perfect freedom ifora the pursuit of their ordinary avocations r - a wbat can be said in defence « the ridiculous absurdity of turning thousands of school children adrift in the streets on election day, as was done in Auckland y • Wo are glad to notice by our teleg«ms that it was done without the know♦t ? e *? r CoMent of the Education Board, and .J. te «hers are to be called to aocount or ""«• responsibility in the matter." There were in the lock-op last sight six pertong on charges of drunkenness; and ~ 4ra " l Thornton (on warrant), ebarged with • husband, and patting bim in ) thAfe he was afraid to go

A. holiness " meeting will be hsld this *' 019 Ponsonby Wesleyan Church chool-room, at half-past wren oWk.

.The following description of a meteor seen in Dunedin is published in tbe Ota go Daily Times " A very brilliant meteor flashed across the sky this (Sunday) evening, a few minutes before seven. Appearing like a shooting sttr darting from the southern heavens, but comparatively near the earth, it grew in brightness till, in two or three seconds, it blazed into mass of flame, lighting up the whole sky, and lookiag as if it were so near that it might fall to the earth. In a moment more the brillianoy bad diminished, and quickly was extinguished altogether, the meteor disappearing in a westerly direction. Was it a world in combustion? One could hardly look at the sudden vision without a feeling of awe. At any rate, it was the grandest meteor I have ever seen."

A Gisborne paper has tbe following :—A few days ago a Maori, well known in Poverty Bay, visited various officcs in Gisborne, "seeking a place," not to build his home, but to get his life taken. Yes, the first instance on record, we believe, of a native waiting to insnre bis life. It is a well known fact that natives aro exceedingly superstitious, and generally look npon life insurance as a tempting of providence and ill luck. Our native friend in question took a more practical view of tho case, and when questioned as to why he should seek insursnce, so uncommon with a Maori, he replied, "Oh, I know it is a tikanga pakeha (European custom), and I have not been well for somt time and will not live long. If I die I want to leave some money to my children." On being informed that ill health would be a bar to bis getting an insurance, he naively replied : "* Why, what is the use of insuring and paying premiums when well and likely to live long ? I thought it was only for those likely to die." Our friend the innocent Maori did not succeed in inducing a local office to do for him, but was advised to apply throagb Mr. Bryce to the paternal Government. Our friend's last exclamation was : " Pakeha, pakeha, your ways are perplexing."

The Timaru Herald writes an article on the characteristics of Mr. Ormond and Mr. Sheeban, and thus conoludes :—" These are the two men who are at present engaged in a death struggle at Napier. If Mr. Ormend g«ts in he will be oue of the most valuable public men in the House, and will go a long way towards restoring public business to a respectable condition. If Mr. Sheehan gets in he will, no doubt, ber what he has been before, an object of wonder that the Almighty should have seen fit to put so much talent into a man so utterly incapable of using it aright."

In aa address to the tieraldinc elector* at Temuka, Mr. Kolleston said:—"There was no question that was exciting m ire interest than education at the present time, and he considered that there could be no medium between a national and a denominational system. He considered great credit was due to the Roman Catholics who from conscientious motives erected schools in which to teach their own children. He trusted they would also allow him credit for the conscientious belief that the present system of education was the best. He believed that a hotter education could bo given under the national system than nnder any other. Althongh he strongly held that a man without religion must be an unhappy man, it would not do to have the State making class distinctions or invading religious principles for which men in former days fought and died. As a member of the Charch of England, he had voted for the exclusion of religious tcaohing in national schools, and he was not prepared to have his children taught the Bible by one who might afterwards scorn and mock it. The grants wonld either starve the country schools or greatly increase the expenditure, and he was of opinion there was no possible means of giving aid to denominational teaching without endangering the national system. Mr. Cox had said that the cost of Higb Schools was too great, and others had proposed that State education shonld go no forther than the Fourth Standard. It was, he thought, • piece of humbug to say such things; the Primary schools were for the poor, and the High Schools were for the rich. He was not one who wished to see his adopted country behind any other iot that most important of all questions—Education. (Cheers.)'*

The passengers by the «.*. lonic testified their appreciation of the care the captain had bestowed during the passage by those in each of the three cabins presenting him with a testimonial just after arrival. The passengers in the sevnral cabins acted in the same direction at one time but quite independently of each other.

His Honor Jadt;e Ward, at a recent sitting of the District Conrt in Timaru, expressed the opinion that the Consolidated Statutes are a nuisance, and he wished the consolidation people would leave the laws alone. They inserted all sorts of ideas and fancies that strnck them as they went along, and the House passed them in bulk, thinking they were mere consolidations. These remarks were made apropos of a reference made by Mr. White to clause 35 of the Property Law Consolidation Act ISS3, which, it appears, is a new enactment. The sooner it was struck out, said the Judge, the better.He was sure the House would not have passed it if they bad seen it, but they accepted these laws without hesitation, supposing them to contain nothing new. Ha remembered that Mr. iVbite had previously pointed out a new clause in the Bills of Sale Act, which upset a number of cases founded on the law as it had stood before its consolidation.

A lad employed at one of the Queen-street saddlery establishments met with an accident yesterday. While engaged at his work he received a cat across his face, extending from the ear to the nose, and going to the bone. The lad'a injuries were attended to by Dr. Huxtable, at Mr. King's dispensary, Qaeen-street.

Mr. Edward Drury, who took an interest in the unfortunate man from Dunedin, who died in Queen-street, has aacceeded in finding ont that he had a brother in Londoo, Mr. W. Young, in good position. He has aent the particulars of Fred Young's death to his brother'* address, "Lodge Hooae, JNew Kent Road, near Deptford, London," so that the relative* of deceased may take each action aa they think fit.

A school teacher, from Lichfield, Waikato, Miss Minnie Harding, was brought down from Waikato last night by the down train, in charge of friends, suffering from temporary aberration of mind, through over study. The young lady will be examined to-day by two medical men as to her mental condition.

A toll-bar is being erectsd on the Mount Albert Road, at Morniogside. ?It will be opened in a few days. The carting of heavy metal, kerbstones, *c., over the road, has been so severe that the Highway Board havdetermined to make a levy on the traffic i„ keep the roads in repair.

* Mr. Alfred Buekland writes as follows :— "The Sheep Act provides that all sheep arriving by sea (with a slight exception, which, from the formalities attending it, is rendered almost inoperative) shall be dipped on being landed. This provision is in every distriot except Auckland fairly required, the imports being almost coafined to stud sheep. But in Auckland the greater number of the sheep constantly used for food are ship borne, and a great cruelty is unnecessarily inflicted on those unoffending animals, besides in a measure injuring them for our use. The situation of Auokland, surrounded as it is by water, necessitated itu being made use of as our principal highway; and a very great injustice has, since the passing of this Act, been passively borne by our settlers, for the cost of dipping, averaging 4d each, is a serious tax, and to this is added the deteriorated appearance of the sheep, or else the necessity of keeping them at considerable expense to recover their health and appearance. The Act provides that all sheep arriving by water shall be inspected within a few days of their being shipped, and a certificate sent with them, otherwise they are not allowed to be landed. This being the case, 1 would respectfully suggest that an alteration should be made in the Act by an addition allowing the ports of Auckland and Onehunga to land sheep from clean districts without their being afterwards dipped. The number of sheep arriving weekly and being dipped is at least 1500, and those sheep are for the most part killed within a week of their being landed. The amount of unnecessary crnelty and injury occasioned is therefore great, and if all parties interested were to have meetings, and request their several representatives to remedy this evil, it wonld be done early in the ensuing session." 1

The following is the state of the Lunatic Asylum, Auckland, for the week ending August 2, 1884 Retnainiog last week, 296; admitted since, 2; died, 1; remaining, 195 males, 102 females, total 297.

Ths excitement over tho election for the Napier seat appear* to have been tremendous at the Napier polling place. The Daily Telegraph give* the following aocount of the Anxiety on the part of eleotors to poll: —" Long before nine o'clock thia morning tbe entrance to the polling place at Napier mi blooked by a crowd of electors anxioai to reoord their votes. Weakly oonatitacnts and the aged bad no chance of voting. Oar representative joined theorowd at ten minute* past ten, and at eleven o'clock, after being squeezed like a pickled herring, his toes crashed, his ribs flattened, and sore all over, fonud that h* was no nearer to the objeot of his ambition than when he started, and so gave it np, or rather was poshed oat of it. One man stated that he was lifted in the crash off his feet and was supported by his hips for twenty minutes; another man fainted through the pressure, and scores of electors dared cot face the terrible ordeal."

The following is tbe state of Her Majesty's Prison, Auckland, for the week ending August 2, 1534 :—On remand, 2 males, 0 female*; awaiting trial, 8 males, 0 females; sentenced to penal servitude, 46 roles, 0 females; bard labour, 61 males, 20 females ; imprisonment; 1 female; default of bail, 4 males, 1 fsmale; received daring the week, 24 males, 3 females ; discharged, 20 males, 1 female; total in prison, 121 males, 22 females.

Two cases of infectious disease have been reported to the Sanitary Inspector, both in Ponionby. The one is a case of scarlet fever, the other of typhoid.

We have to aoknowladge a espy of thia month's " Bredsbaw " from Mr. A. D. Bennett, the Auckland agent. This gold* appears to be greatly used bj travellers as an authentic work.

A special meeting of the members of the AseUud Licensed Victuallers' Association is called tor to-morrow afternoon at three o'clock.

Notices of interest to the shareholders in the Presaler and Lora Stanley Gold Mining Companies appear la our advertisement columni.

To-day Messrs. E. and A. Isaacs will hold an exteniire sale of general goods, Including briar pipes, dolls, jags, candlesticks. vasts, albnms. glasses, water-bottles, carafes, sc. The sal* bsglns at eleven o'clock.

A soiree dansante by the pupils of Profeisor Bsrnard is to be held this evening In the Masonic HalL

Shareholders ia ths Thames Golden Crown Company who hiri sot paid their call* by the 14th butaat, will hare them forfeited.

Forfeited shares in the New Colonial Gold Mining Compis? are to be void by Mr. Blnney on the 12th lottant at ha)f-p*st eleven.

Forfeited shares ia the Queen of England G.M.Co. are to be sold on the 12th instant by Mr. Blnney.

A call of Gd per share has been made In the UarnoUa G JLCo*, payable on or before the 18th Instant. i

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New Zealand Herald New Zealand Herald, Volume XXI, Issue 7089, 6 August 1884

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