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OUR HOME LETTER.

T3B first session of the eighth Parliament of New Zealand was opened on ' the 18th of May, and the speech of the Governor, in which the policy proposed f will beofoupd.c«l3ewhere. T The_ r Whitakei: TBjmetrjV- coniposed-of v in6if- of' large " ea.pgnence-m : -pnblic-affairß > ~wh6 have shown themselvSa able to carry ouli a r','.'. poUey_o£ retrencHment .ih'-jexpenafture;; ' "and who"ge'.'concluct during their term <>■;; most! prudeptyand ' -l '<&cufestfec£.'< The''retirement of- , Mr, -■ Hall 1 ; has .no- doubt' to v some .extent ■■■■•Sreak&ed'the Ministry, but with?care-•—-fol management - they ought to .retain % lUiwJj the session.' The I Unopened the.lbnsiness , . of i.the' session 'on ■ May will , be found else-r"Tw£3?*-I .3£?> S^ 6 contains a large ,• Vi'vprQpoxtion.Qf niew members,. ' | . L]___The-much-talked-of._ineetifag culled J- t bJ-Tawhiao, the Maori Kingi has como •" 'off J dunng'the past month, but has! ' „"?",; beeoyKgreat disappointment" lit will !»?•'? Jw 'remembered\that TslWhiao spoke of, . tie-meeting when he was in , Auckland, 1 he' invited -at-" ! '" ; The"pfoceedirig3-did not 1 comappointed, and so -t;';nnich:time lost at the' beginning that very few' Europeans" remained for - ut " l ; i '. Owing to-the; near ° s l ! approiicn' of; ..the", meeting; p£ 'ParliaMinister .was not c« i --j&iV.it«.aiiendy '* even .iiad he been die- „ -poe»i-to do'so, bufcthe GoTernmerit was Mr. K S.- Bush.'BesiU ' r Asnli "Magistrate \i at;! .Qpotikij,. and r~7"£«^perly, ;^at.r Raglap.; jthe: ~ 'made "at . tfie ! ; by . ___Tawhiao aiid "several :!of ;the-. principal •...ri.'.;j H^a .>'.ofA the.{party ,t the'.desirea ..of: the ,; ' !i "''Kiiijgi^ fv&ij, 'be gathered pretty dis.~~fiSSt'lyr; ;They" find caiinpt: ; fpr»s;'ent_tn!Bir'; territory/iro'm- being encroached, upon; Members of .v their -j;i iierwn'parfcyiwilLseUjand, and.t,hns ' '■ :r S3ag boun.trf" is curtailed. : They have, r.. . to the .conclusion that ;■' , to riitike d certain :"ieeritoryr:a. i:eserve, ! and to_obtain the x;>H.'.'^motion;i of the-. . Government toi the This is the fii-st time party-hare' in 'any way rea,nd/ ijome oj '-■•»arrangement; of;benefit:to both parties, may be the consequence. The GovernT 'm(sA'iit is thought, will not' "be/averse .■foHmakingjiiiaHe'nable; a! ; certain, terri-, —Jaryifor_ tUfi_Jling _party, and prevent.Jf.'j.., :ing- land-dealing, withfin ;*' Government, how- ' 'ever, no doubt '.that tb.e -r.?.r,c;Kingitesr. ihiireturriT for ' tliis :r ',j- i '. ; iction ! ,' concede /a -Tailway: line, with '" 'blocks of land'.ion:,;the, route. ••^γ;3Jhei-jJKlingiteaT, haye ; -"empowered :r £a ". I ?'' / , r ;Wiie6rD I t; Mi,H.-R.j to.make repr'esenta'"^'""fiorS'^on,''thlir ''behaUi.'.tpJthe'GjJverns andr it ..ia f "quite.: possible j that »it .•.■.aomething;-oiE.. importanoe, V and of • ! ' irf '' :) ■tJexiffiVto : ■b"o^ T )H'^^. , pfty.■) : !' resu l* ; - r jquitje: manifest &dny ihe tone of i:.:.t.- o±&aE[ngites that tiey,seelqiiiiejplauily vs '~~ to'theEurp-' ~i~ ;-rpeans, - and :;that-. r .iheir.- earnest endeasV^rr,.TOu^',liM:,liie t: 'dtteciecl i to-preventing isiia any disturbance of-peaceful rrelations -——between-the-races.' "£. which. ;';;:,;■ prohibited all dealing in',,liquors;in;the_ nwghbourhpba-' of'. Alexandra'-'during' -s -•' ■. ■ 0.. meetings;' a 'good' deal -of JdruhkeniJsss: took 'place . amongst : the •-; -j•■:> and'o n the -last day, Tawhiao came ■ ; v forward himself -to -speak while h> : a " i.!! Vstate.of is :vje'ry sad ;. T ;:; : ? ( to.see a fine-'raco like the Maoris de- - by the vices; ■yvhich :-.'.i -.line'have introduced .amongst them. -;;.'?■ 'V llp'vTamhaki,. all is quiet amongst ,^li.! s linost; ;pf', the Maoris formerly_liying_at L Parihaka,- under the ~!o 'e teaching of; the prophet Te, Whiti, 'dispersed tp. their O'svn settle-■:-.j .i,-j MjastAs. -.-Te: Whiti' and : . Tohu 'are -—---npw-at- Ohristchurch, _ awaiting ■ their ;charges on/ which, iiL-i-! -^eyVwere'coVmitted. to .the Supreme !:'}, !; Apparently, ,the Government _- __'de3ire_ to treat them with, indulv '--ir gence, ;■ for since'they"" have been in ';,\j:\ yOanterbury, they have been engaged; •; ■■;'»' under the" guidance ..'of, the Resident _. Magistrate, in seeing the sights of ~l plac'ej including!the Exhibition. -•■'.■- J:!^Xi£. l ;sxa ,: v cases' 'at-.; I New' Mymouth, - '""-ander'the ■ West Coast /Settlements —— the Government entered a nolle ~~',%'.' : . va. consequence of' ; a ' state--'■■>.'•;*men'fc,'l)y ; Mr-'-' Justice Gillies in his V..f.Vj.;:!oi^j^,to'the'''Gfraiid : Jary that the Act required that the officer making the :;:.-!..' r arrests shToul3 .haye.aspecial anthority ■,fi l ~ r .- : &<)nl'theGovernor.-.-.- , v ■:.- ■'■': •;.'; -The.-Gustdins returns continue to a.gratifymg increase, and the ■jriT.i)iS?!??* r 7 9P t} 16 ■w'hole is prosperous and ],There will be a. surplus : I , : of ; over £200,000, which, will t-'» -materially assist the Government in ~ -~~an.y arrangements which it may make opening up ( o£ ;the country and -;-- ..-> V'wia"cb:astruction of public works. The progress is being made in si-!*'. .iMs-iprovinclai' district, of :Auckland, .._.. -—•yhere a> large amount of new land »is '■ .tieipg^:brought into cultivation,, and nfik i'whicb:; is; receiving considerable acces- '■''■'■ '■' nbis of settlers with capital adequate -' '.~tq making the best use of the land they '.a j/tairfliup. - :,;.; ;'•. ■ '■■ \' - . ;'.,, •'-'■_- -On the Bth of May a meeting was Mm teld. in Auckland to add another voice ,'" : ■ :'l of protest against the outrages being in Russia against the Jews. - :;, .The meeting was addressed by His '> :v"Worship the Mayor r Bishop Oowie, ' : Mr; J. O. Firth, Rev. T. Buddie (Wesleyan), Rev. McKenzie Fraser (Presby- . >rian), Mr. Larkins, Mr, G. W. Griffin , (Fnited States Consul), &c. The news received by cable in Auck--"land on the Bth of May of the murder of Lord F. Cavendish and Mr. T. H. Burke in Pho3nix Park created a strong feeling throughout New Zealand. There is, as a matter of course, iponsiderable difference of opinion in Zealand on the Irish question, and ■whether or not the land laws should nob be entirely changed; but there is ft nniveral sentiment, even amongst those -who approve the objects of the Irish Land League, of deep sorrow and nndignation that an officer should have been murdered who came to Ireland as the inaugurator of renewed concession by the Liberal. Government. A sad calaniity occurred at Timaru on the 14th of May. On that day a heavy sea rose, and two ships -which were lying in the roadstead—the City o£ Perth ..and the Benvenue—parted ' -their cables and went on shore. The <Hsaater was unhappily attended by loss of life. Some of the boats which went ,off to attempt to save one of the ships were upsei; by the heavy sea, and Bev Mal meii were drowned. Hirinii Taiwhanga and two other * aatiye chiefs;: of the ; Bay of Islands eistncfc, are now on'their way to Eng- ™* *•***,>. petition to the Queen, K^ 8 f -° r « r x^ resa of breads o£ the Treaty o £ Waitangi.

This treaty, it ws(f° e em \ er was concluded the colony wal constituted, gj TJfe natives of the B&V pi Islftads district complain that .it, number of payticultCrs/aria "tKey subscribed £300 to send Homo three of the Queen. They Mr ;; Bright and other politicians who'tßey. : | think-afe disposed, to. assist their.cause,;.; The first annual iroporfc of tho directorsjof the Northern Steamship Company, presented, at tho annual general meeting of ahareholdere held 'on May 15, discloses: a very successful business year. Tho result, if wo inoliide the sums carried to the insurance is about 17 per cent, on the-paid-up capital. The bencat conferred upon the northern districts especially; as indicated by: tho abeve figures,'is not tbbo estimated by reference to tho operations of a single- year. As a matter of fncfc, local trade -only needs an impetus to extend itself, and besides tho facilities of carriage to tho centraV market/ there is always an increase of activity where there is a certainty that its legitimate results will find a ready sale. The net profit on the year ending March the 31st, after full appropriation for. all known bad doubtful debts, amounts to £8550. From this tho shareholders receive > handsomq" dividend for the half-year ending September 30,, 1881,' i»t the rate of 10 per oent. por annuni, and a dividend at tho same rate, for tho quarter ending'the~3lst of December, ISBV, making £3791 8s 3d,<lenving available for division' for the last quarter of ,the year the sum of £«5S 17s 10d. -Ou* of this divisible -balance, the directors, recommended on Monday, a dividend, »lso atjthe rate of 10 per c*nt. per annum, which payment will absorb £1303.12s 3d. They have written off £1000 for depreciation, and they carry £2000 to the creation of an insurance fund, carrying forward to prowls and loss new account, £t55 os 7d. The report -of ithe directors was: adopted unanimously." and . tho services of•'the directors, which ; wore acknowledged to bo most valuable, wero rowarded. by. the shareholders with eubjitoatial recognition.:. This young company has dono, is doing, and is likely to do, further, good service to this, part of the colony,. They are building a 'new ; eteamer , for tho East Coast trade, and, taken altogether, thoir prospects are as bright as thoir energy and success have been remarkable. , ■ . ~■ ; . ECCLESIASTICAJL.. ' ■"• The Rev. Mr. Downing, Baptist minister, ■whohaslately arrivedfrom Brisbane, preached in the WeUesley-strcet Baptist Church on the 23rd April, to a crowded congregation. Hβ also addressed tho Suuday-scliool in the j afternoon; , ■ •• . Dr. Messing, Chief Rabbi of the congregation of Bath-Israel, San Francisco, was a passenger on April 25 bythes.B. Australia for 'Frisco. His mission in the Australian colonies ..and .New- Zealand,, .was' to procure financial aid from his co-religionists for some schools- in connection with his synagogue, founded on the model of the free schools iu London.' , ...' .'.' '";■-,.' On April 30, the/anniversary services in connection with the United Methodist Free Church Sunday-school, at the corner of Pitt and Vincent streets, were held. In the morning tho collection amounted to £14 93, in the afternoon td £3 19s 3d, and in the evening to £lt 11s 9d, making for tho day £30. ■ The opening services in connection with St. Johnjs new YYesleyan Church, Ponsonby, were .held on/April 30.7 The collections, which were in aid.of,,the .church building fund, wore as follows :—Morning, £20 133; afternoon, £3.2s 7d; : evening, £7 11s 8(1: :total,-£3l7s 3d. ~;:-,;;■ :?:-■■■ Aservicejwas.holdott Sunday, May 7, at the hospital, by the Rev'. B. T. Dudley, for -thabenefit-bf the patients and others. It ww3 held in the main corridor up3tairs, owing to the inclemency of' the weather. JA ; largo' number of the members of 'St. ■ Sepulchre's choir were present, the service being full choral. '. .'•■,.'. .'. ■ ■■ .'A ''", -'A '.''J' j The anniversary services of the iWellesleystreet Baptist Church Sunday-school j were held o-a. May 14 ,i'n the Choral Hall. ; Mr. Thomas. Spnrgeon preached morning* aud evening. , ".. . /■'.., '•'■';■"■ .:\,,\ -TRESENTATiaNS..■ "T i - On the occasion of I;he marriage of the Rev. John' Haseld<:n a deputation,, representing the three congregations of Epiphnny Church, Newton; Sfc Luke's, Mount Albertf and tha Whan, waited upon iiim, and, Oα hehalf of the parishioners, tendered their most cordial good wishes for the happiness of himself and bride, aud also-presented to him a purse of sovereign,' as a token of the respect and esteem in which he is held by them. Mr. Haseldeu thanked the doputation.'and asked them to express his thanks to the parishioners. •■-• ' •• On Saturday, the 29th April, a presentation of a handsome timepiece was made by the members and adherents of the Presbyterian Church, West Tainaki, to Miss Taylor, on the eve of her marriage with the Rev. Mr. Farley. On May 0, a number of gentlemen entertained Air. Kennedy Hill to a farewell dinner at G Wynne's Hotel,, Hamilton, on the occasion of his leaving Waikato. Mr. Hill wa3 also presented with a handsome gold watch, as a kindly memento on the part of his friends then present and others, ; . of an address and purse of sovereigns was made on May 8, at Milne's Commercial Hotel, Hamilton, to Mr. W. Pickett, late Sub-Inspector of the WaikatoAuckland line, by the railway employes. ■ Ihe address had been beautifully illuminated by Mr. Slater, of Auckland, and'wa3 accompanied by a purse of sovereigns. A presentation was made on May 12 to Miss Palmer, assistant, teacher to the East Hamilton School, by the children, on tho occasion of her leaving,, which has been rendered necessary by ill-health. The Rev. Mr. Edger being about to proceed to England for his health's sake, a valedictory meeting of the congregation to whom he ministered in the Loruo-streot hall, and other ministers and friends, was held on the 17th May in the. Lornc-street hall to bid him farewell. During the evening Mr. Edger wae presented with a purse of sovereigns. Several addresses were delivered, and musical selections rendered, the proceedings throughout being of a very interesting character. At a meeting of the late Ponsonby Regatta Committee—Mr. J. Waymouth in tho chair —a gold pencil case, which had been eubucribed for by the members of the committee, was presented to Mr. F. A. Jones, lato hon. secretary, in recognition of the high esteem for his conduct generally, and for the excellent, manuor in which ho had performed hia duties aa secretary. MEETINGS AND AMUSEMENTS. ThoconcertonApril2s,giveiibythochildrcn ot the West Hamilton School, in the Public Hall, in aid of a school library fund, if as in every way a success, and roflected most creditably on the evident pains which have been taken by the public instructor of music to the Waikato schools, Mr. T. A. Bell, in the discharge of his duties. A public entertainment woe held on April 25, in connection with the Tuakau Young Men's Mutual Improvement Class, whpn some of the young people came forward to show their talent. The mcoting was conducted by Mr. W. Jones, who opened the meeting by singing one of Moody'a and Sankoy's hymns, after which Mr. Oldham engaged in prayer. A public tea meeting of a novel kind, as far as Port Albert is concerned, took placo in the Public Hall on Tuesday evening, April 25. It may be described briefly, as a public forewell to Mr. George Plummer and family, who has left for Auckland by steamer. There was the inevitable preliminary tea, extra excellent and extra abundant on this occasion, possibly to compensate for tho extra non-joyousuess of the occasion. Tno annual Eoir<Se in connection with the Presbyterian Church, Big Omaha, was held in the schoolroom on April 25. The Rev. R. McKinney occupied the chair. After an excellent tea, the Chairman gave interesting remarks on the progress made in this ana the surrounding districts during tho last twenty years. Then began the performance of a long and carefully-selected programme. The annual meeting of the subscribers to bt. Stephens Orphan Home, Paruell, was held on April 27. The Right Rev. Dr. Cowie Bishop of the Uioceae, presided. The annual report was read Dy Mr. G. P. Pierce. It showed that the institution is proeresaine satisfactorily, and there arc now 58 inmates in the Home—34 boys and 24 girls. This is the same number aa -n-as at the commencement of the sessional yoar. The roport of the medical officer. Dr. Goldsbro, was also read The Treasurer, Mr. Rawlings, read the financial statement, which showed that the total receipts from all sources was £1344 10b Id. Tho Bishop delivered an excellent address, after which the report and balanceaheet were adopted, and the customary votes of thanks, &c., passed. The names of the children recommended for prizes for needle-

work, also thoeo for prizes as the result of thoiexanliAition made by the Steyp Mriv/Tfoleoij, Various renjyjred during tho j&k extraSraidaW njeetJmg of the shareholders Company was held on tho Ist instllnt, K*? tho purpose of increasing the capital of tho Company by tho ,oreation-of 5000 nuw r shares atfp oach, ria s!!c "chairman iii his address showed ~the~nvpidprog'ress ofi Auckland aa proved by the groat, increase in" tlio consumption of gas. H* -stated ■■ that-in-1878 there,wero«2a,CQ2,flaQ, feet of gas consumed ;: in 1880, 35,546,q00 feet ;in 1881, 45,098,000 foot; and during tjho. six months ended on the 31st December, 1881, 28,742,000 feet* , After aome debate the. proposed increase of tho capital was agreed 1 to, also that the now shares be disposed, of jby I tender, as the directors see fit. ',' \] i ' . An entertainment was held in the Epsom, hall on Friday, April 28, in aid of tho building fund, and was certainly tho most successful yet held under the auspices of the socioty, as the whole affair was carried but without a single hitch. ■• , j I The inaugurallecturp in connection with the i St. Stephen's Literary and Mutual Impro'voment Association wasdelivorelin the church on the 28th April, by tho'-Jtor. Mackenzie'Fraser. ■■■''>'.-::■'■. ..,>■, i ■ On 28th April a Church of England soiree was held in. the Tuakau school-house,• to welcome tho Rev.' P. S. Smallnold, who has been placed in chargoof tho district. - , j "' Another festival has been held lit Pa"paroa, the anniversary of the openingof the \Vesleyan chapel, and the trustees, taking advantage of the appointment of the Rov. A. C. Cii'ighey, their old friend, to tho Wairoa district,! invited him to preach on the ;30tW of April, which he did. The next day, Monday, a public tea was prepared for tho expected guests, of whom a goodly numbor responded, notwithstanding the adverse weather. ! The soiree in connection with the opening of St. John's Church, Pouaonby, was held on' May 2. Tea was served in the'Ponaonhy Hail. The Socretary of the trustees of-the church read the annual report. The following balance-sheet was also road :— i ■■' RHOEIPT3-—Subscriptions paid to dato. £400 4» (Sd ; gross bizaar, £438 15s 10(1; lees oxpoiuej, £50 Vim 4d—£43o 3« o.i ; amount \>J collecting- hooka, £4517 a: not proceeds soiree at stono liylnir, -£ll IB> 3d; collections at Btnna laying,' £3 On Sd -i clilld's cards, £9 Bs 8d ; collections last Sunday, £31 7<3tl — £943 3* 10d; subscriptions to ruceived, £53;25— £331 5« 10d : probable proceeds of soiree nnd service, £40-£lo2t Bβ 10d j debt £1031 14j 41: tolftl, £2053. SnrtMilTDM, — Contract, £llil)9 ; sojta, ■ £120 : Tarnishing, £19; gas Ottinsjs, 445; foncing ivrid arcliltoefs Tecs. .vn.. about £150—£2033; matting, ! &c j820: total, £2059. . , , ; A first meeting of the directors of the Waikato Cheese Factory was held on the 2nd May, when Mr. Soddou was appointed chairman, and 1 Mr. John Knox secretary. The Hamilton auction mart was fixed:on as the office of tho company. Captain Steele, Mr. Browne Wood, and tho chairman, were appointed a committee to furnish Captain Runciman with instructions for his guidance while iu America, aud it was stated that his passage was secured by tho May mailsteamer. Captain Uuncimiin will return in August with full particulars ,as _to tho sizo, &c, 01 the necessary buildings, latest improved plant, &c, so as to have the factory in. working order by the Ist. October. ' T. i . To commemorate the. anniversary of the Band of ilope and' Temperance Society a, soiree was held in the Protestant Hall,'Pukekohe East, on Tuesday, May 2. ■ •'■' The anniversary of the-Uaited Methodist Free Church, at the corner of Pitt-street and Vincent-street, was ; celebrated: on the 2nd of May by the usual .soiree. The tea was served in the school bnihling adjoining'the church, and the public mcetiug in the church afterw.irde. ■; , An interesting anniversary eolobratiori was held on the, 3rd. May in the new Wcsleyan Church at Northcoto. There was a,, very large atteridauceof adherents, members, and settlers at the soirue and public meeting held in the building. Mr. T. Buddie occupied the chair. Ou the sth May the annual meetiuc of \ the Auckland Auxiliary of the British! and Foreign Bible Society was held,in the Tijolin'g Men's Christian Association Rooms. Xheßcv. , T. Buddie occupied the chair. The meeting was well attended. : Tho RevV H. H. iiawry read the annual report. The agent of the Auckland Auxiliary reported that the stock in hand at the depot was 6423 volumes of |Holy Writ, as against 3977 last year The number of volumes issued during the year, from rtho depflti at the corner of Wellesley-street and Albert-street, has been 3426 in the'Eiißliah language, 253 in Maori, 9 Latin, 10 French, 1 Italian, 1 Danish, 7 German, 3 Swedish, 13 Greek, 5 Hebrew, and 1 Tongan, making a total o£ 3720 volumes, as against 3055 last year. The amount realised from the sale of books last year was £241 15s. .Id This year it is £244 19s Bd. The report and balance-sheet were adopted, and the officers of the Society for tho, year vrere elected, after which the meetingfseparated.' ' ■ ' ' ■ > ' ■' { The formal opening of the Kaipara Canning Company's works, at Helensville, took place on the 6th May. A number of visitors from Auckland, and a number of the settlers in the neighbourhood were present. Mr. J. A. Wilson, who has for a. considerable time been connected with a meat preserving establishment in Auckland, is the moving spirit in the new undertaking. The site of the company's works is well-choseu for carrying on a successful and extensive trade. The annual meeting of the Ponsonby "At Borne" Society was held oh May 11, in Miss Hill's school-room, Ponsonby-roail. Mr. T. T. Masefield presided. : The anniversary, of the Young Men's Christian Association was celebrated on. the 12th of May, by the soiree and annual public meeting in the lecture room of the association, at the corner of Wellesley and Albert-streets. The trays were provided by the Misses Buddie, Fairburn, Tremain, Bartlett, Mesdames Goldic, Mackie, .Wiseman, Brackenrig, Wilson, Kcnderdine, Smith, Edwards, who also presided at the tea-tables. Addresses were delivered by Mr. F. Battloy, Rev. A. Carrick, Mr. Vines, and Mr. T. Spurgeon, interspersed with selec-, tions by the choir. The annual concert and ball in connection with tho Railway Band was held on May 12 at the Choral Hall, and was a great success. A ball was held at the close. On May 15 Mr. D. P. Hales, Assistant District Engineer, left for the Thames to lay out the Morrinsville and Te Aroha railwny line for contract. This will connect Hamilton and the whole of the Waikato lino with tho Thames River, and give railway accommodation to an extensive and fertile country. The length of the line will be some sixteen or seventeen miles. The annual examination of the Oneliunsa Roman Catholic schools was held on the loth and ICth of May, in the presence of a largo number of the clergy aud parents and friends of the pupils. The annual soiree of the Wellesley-street Baptish Church Sunday-school was held on May IC, at the rooms of tho Young Men's Christian Association. There was a very largo attendance, and the tea tablee hnd to be served in relays. The tables wore presided over by the lady teachers of the school and some of tho elder scholars. The after public meeting was held in the church adjacent, which was crowded. A tea meeting and entertainment in connection with the Wellesley-street Baptist Church Sunday.Hchool was held on May 17. The tea took place in the rooms of tho Young Men's Christian Association, and the after meeting in the Church school-room. There wos a large attendance of the scholars, the building being crowded. An extraordinary general meeting of tho shareholders of tho South British Insurance Company was held on May 19. for tho purpose of confirming a resolution passed on tho 10th of April, for the purpose of enlarging the powers of tho directors in regard to investments. Mr. J. Howard and Mr. Thomas Morrin moved that tho alteration of subsection 4 of article 00 of tho "articles of association" passed at the extraordinary meeting held in April, be confirmed. Tho motion was carried unanimously.

INQUESTS AND ACCIDENTS. Information reached HolensviUe that James Greenhil!, cashier to Messrs. l>. and I. MeLeod, was found dead in his bed on the morning of April 1!), at his lodgings, Makiirau. Mr. Greenliill has been long known and much respected by all who knew him, for his sterling honesty anil upright conduct wherever employed, as a cashier, or calculator. In a timber yard, it is questionable if his superior was ever found on the Kaipara, and with hie handsome burlv form, and benevolent looking countenance, combined with retiring manners, approaching to almost feminine modesty, he was a universal favourite, and gained a large circle of friends wherever ho resided On Friday, the 21st April, the inquest was held at the Kaipara Hotel, Helensvillo. The jury having heard all the evidenco that could be procured, returned as their verdict that the immediate cause of death was paralysis of the heart, hastened by the constant use ot narcotic medicines. The j jry desired to express their astonishment that such modi ra? 68 w" b ° pro Cared so reatiil y by the geno-

of a very serious natnre ocjgarted omitting in John(afreak PoneoiibV, by>w}iichrfiyo'mei.rfJUned'; [iJpnrcs M,cl&ipspn aud - '£eripnalyj;injaj!ed. ff pOjCuttipgat th'e'y |y?eqo' avray thij fall,' for the un'dermfning* tho face, tho earth above a soapy vein which jruns through tne strata, suddonly gave -way— wjiilov the, others very , narrowly .espaped- ■ previous teethe accident, i. at ;.once, n cp a nvey,ed and attended to by Br. Pnils'on,"*Jvlio ?6urid iipon" examination that tho left log had been broken below the luibe, biit tfib limb was~so awpllen that it could not. be sot. His finger was also frightfully crushed, and tho skin completely stripped off. -McGibbon was conveyed to his residence in Poosonby, and was attended to by Dr. Damson, who found that tho patient's shoulder had dislocated,' and ho immediately set it, with the assistance of Mr. John Kean, : who was superintending the, works .in John-street, on behalf of the Pbnsonby Highway Board, at tho timo of tho accident. -Dr. Hooper and Dr. Goldsboro' 'wero~also called in tho afternoon to examine McGibbon, , and agreed that further than a severe shaking,-they had no apprehension of liis 'having sustained any aorious internal injury. •,.'■. . ,■■: . '■•'- '.■."'• Joseph Antony, eecond cook of the s.s. Te Anau, was admitted to the hospital on April 25 with a badly scalded foot. The injuries were received on Saturday lost; when the steamer was lying off-Napier. It seems that he applied to tho captain of the nhip to be sent ashoro at Napier, but this request was refused, and Antony had not the wound dressed until he was. attended at tho hospital on Tuesday afternoon. The treatment of this man, who is a foreigner, appears to be unkind, and oven cruel. : ■ • • Our Cambridge correspondent writes :— " A nasty accident happened to Mr. Frank ■Coiilthard, of ■ the;,saw-mil.la, when riding through Hautapu on April 27. Ho was thrbvrn from his' horse and isoveroly bruisod and hurt about the face and head. The sorVicba of Dr. Edgelow were fortunately available, and under his skilful treatment Mr. Coulthard is already about ,iii;.iin as -usual." ■Mr., \yebst;or,a shunter' employed at the Auckland R3iway Station, met with an ugly 'accident on the 27th"April;*-while employod at his usualroccnpatiQn. He was iu the act of stepping on to the engine when ho missed his footing; arid was caughtby the tail-end of ; the' cow-catcher. 'His ankle was broken,: and he had a very narrow escape of losing his.i leg. Dr. Richardson visited the injured man and set the ankle. Ho is of opinion that tho mishap will doprivo Mr. Webster of the use of tho,limb for some very considerable time, and probably it will never bo thoroughly.''strong. Fortunately; the Railway Benefit Society provides for persons injured on the railway, and, as Mr. Webster is a member, ho is entitled to the relief it offers/ It was on., tho morning of Saturday, April 29, about a quarter to. 11 o'clock—all : tho mill employe's being engaged at their several duties,, whfin, suddenly the notice of i the workmen was attracted by aloud whirring sound, and also by an increased velocity of tho sawing machinery. In less time than J tako to write it, both sound and motion increased, until it was something frightful; Some rushed, to the engino-houso, while others, in fact -the- most, made a , regular stampede, and then came a crash, : followed by. a.,loud rushing of steain. The increased momentum had been' too much for the largo fly-wheel (over three tons weight), and away it went, crashing through the roof of the engirio-hpuse, and its fragments flying in all directions. Huge pieces of metal, varying in weight from 3cwti'to half a ton, were hurled to a distance of over 100 yards ;, while smaller pieces, with heavy pieces' of timber arid sheets bf roofing iron, were being scattered right and left. Orio huge piece of .the, fly-wheel came crashing through thereof of the boiler-house, and fell upon, one of,tho three boilers, bursting in 7 two of ; tlie plates. Jt was this that caused, the rushing of thesteam. Willing hands quickly dreyr and extinguished the furnaces,, in order to, prevent further accident. At preeent,. ; the cause of. the • accident can only .beiconjectured, but it is supposed that' something went wrong with the governors. There wero only- two casualties, and bat'■trifling—viz., .Messrs. Guthrio and Cosscr—the one receiving a bruiso on his hand, Biid the other on his leg. The engine-driver,' who had rushed to tho throttle valve in order to shut off the steam, had a most miraculous escape. Whileat his post the ffeed pipe leading from the boilers to the engine broke down, knocking him into a corner j but, strange to say, tho only injury he received was the tearing of his pants. An old Maori woman was burned to death at Paeroa on the 30th April, through the whare in which aho was sleeping catching fire. An inquest -wae held on "May 4, at the Lunatic Asylum, by Dr. C. F. Goldsbro', Coroner, on the body of a man named John Williams, who had been a patient in tho institution. After hearing tho evidence of the medical superintendent (Dr. Young), and one of the nurses, the jury returned a verdict of. " death from natural causes." : An inquest was held on the afternoon oi May 4, at 2 o'clock, befdro Mr. Thos.' Jackson, on the body of the late Otto Ehol, which was found lying on the beach near Waitangi on tho previous day. Mr. E. Hamlin, M.H.R., was chosen foroman. Tho jury having vjewod the body, Robert Craig, settler, residing at Waipipi, Thomas McGowan, Samuel Barriball. Constable Parker, and James Dalzicl, a duly qualified medical practitioner, gave evidence. Dr. Dalziel stated that his opinion was that death had been caused by drowning. --Tho jury, after a short deliberation, brought in their verdict, " Found drowned." ; There is grave reason to fear/ that Lieut. Zlirn, late of the German army, and well known to many of the citizens of Auckland, hns perished in the bush, near Coromandel. Hedeft ,the residence of Mr. Luks, on the Tokatea range, on May 5, shortly after noon, in order to collect Jems and mosses, aud other botanical specimens, having his ,gun with him in order to procure some kakas; Ifwas his intention to explore Paul's Creek, with the intention of returning; in the evening, before dusk. As he did not return that night, his friend, Mr. Luks, oamo to the conclusion that ho had gone on to Coromandel. On the following morning he telephoned to soveral persons in Coromandel inquiring if he had arrived there, but on being replied to iu the negative immediately proceeded to organise search parties, and scour tho ranges. Tho missing man waa tracked to the vicinity of Basche's claim,, south of tho Waverley, and towards Kennedy's Bay, whero all traces of him ceased. On Sunday further search parties went out from tho top of the Tokatea, and searched towards Kennedy's Bay, while a party from Coromandel searched the bush on tho Paul's Creek side of the range, but not the slightest trace could bo obtained. Tho BearclT was prosecuted on Monday by largo bodies of men, but fruitlessly. Lieutenant Ztirn had been resident in Coromandel district for somo months past, and therefore must havo had a tolerably good notion of tho trend and configuration of the bush in tho district, but several days' exposure to the wet aud cold lately experienced leavo little hopo of his ever Wing recovered alive. Mr. Luks has offered £20 reward for his recovery (alive or dead). A serious accident happened on Saturday, May 0, to a son of Mr. Simins, the contractor for tho iron railway bridgo in course of construction at Hamilton over tho Waikato rivor. Tho unfortunate youth was at tho crane, and when loosing down the chain ran his right hand too far down tho spur-wheel, till threo of his fingers got jammed between the spurwheel and the pinioL. The second and third fingers had to be amputated close up to tho hand, and the little finger is so badly crushed that Dr. Carey ha 3 littlo hope of saving it. On Saturday, May C, Patrick Collins, the driver of tho Whau omnibus, had a narrow escapo of receiving serious if not fatal injury. He was sitting in his place on his omnibus, which was standing opposite Messrs. Quick and Co.'s stables, Victoriastreet, when the horses suddenly started olf down the street. In going round the corner of Queen-street, at Messrs. Neale and Co.'s premises, Collins was jolted off his box into the street. He with commendable presence of mind held on to the reins, being dragged along for a short distance, when he fell, the hind wheel of thi» omnibus passing over the greater portion of his body. Tho injured man was at onco taken to the promisee of Mr. B. Hill, chemist and druggist, where Dr. T. Evans dressed his wounds. Collins was subsequently taken to tho hospital, but on Sunday his wifo came iu from tho Whau, aud had him removed home. An unfortunato accident occurred on board the barque Orient, which arrived from Livorpool on May 13, during her passage out. It appears that on Wednesday (10th) an apprentice named Henry Ogg, ninctoon years of age, Tvas sent up to oil the foretopgailaritmast, and while ho was engaged in doing bo the vessel suddenly gave a lurch, which

caused-hiiinf:t6"lo£o his footing and fall over- | effort was put forth I • :by those v on board to save him.,,;'A.bsa.l;;,wia ) jlbwereUStndmanned and a searjjji m'fyde-iont,! , sea was runnj'ig high/^anc, j»U /neir~exerfipns proved frtdtieSsT iOgg , and a native iofyjDunJfoo,- ' and THEWrig Shipped at that portvon board the Orient was on his first vogago to sea. Tho accident to Mr. B. Hindle, rushed -hy -'- a # cow : in~ the - stockyard, was " 'happily not so - seriotis as-ab-first supposed. tie.' Edgolow found'--the .arm' ripped open ;frora -.the;..cll;Q>y~ ta^;thfi..,.wrist; > . .and ~tho, muscles more or less lacerated)- but no bones wore broken,' nor woe his shoulder dislocatod. ..... Tho other day a. labourer, named Robert Curwin, mot with an accident to his leg, which necessitated hisreraoval to the hospital. ■ The wound turned out to be worse than had been anticipated, —namely, a compound fracture of the log, and he ha 3 endurod considorablo suffering. An'elderly man named Wm. Neil, stated to belong to Papakura Valley, is roportcd as having boon lost in the bush near Dargaville. Ho was a gum-digger, and ■on Sunday week had gouo into the bush for mikau to builfl a whare, but never returnod. For several days Maori and European search parties wero out in search, but failed to get any traces of the unfortunate man. Dense bush exists for miles round tho place whero the occurrence took placo. ' ' A miner named John Hawkins, working in tho Radical Claim, Owharoa, met with a very painful accident on Saturday, May 13, about noon. Hβ was using dynamite in tho drivo on which he was engaged. During the forenoon his party had had a couple of miss-shots on account of the dynamite,boing frozen, and at dinnor timo fetched to their hut six cartridgos and three primes. Hawkins warmed a " billy" of water at tho firo and put , these cartridges into a 21b. moattin, putting tho tin into tho boiling water. After doing no he turned round, and immediately the whole lot exploded. Tho back of his legs and arms aro much cut by tho pieces o^tin from the."billy" and meat-tin. He was carried to Paoroa on a stretcher, and from theuso , by open boat to Kopua, aud, on arrival at the hospital, was promptly attended t6 |jy Drs. Payne and Callan. A young Kdward Walters, 'was brought to tho Thames from tho Miranda on the 13th May, suffering fixjm a severe • cut inr the foot.' A few days ago tho unfor- . tunato fellow, returning from a heated chase after a dog, took an axe for .tho purposo of Chopping some firewood. Being at tho time greatly excited by tho chase, and trembling violently, ho was unable to hold tho implewhich descended on his foot, inflicting a dbbp and painful gash. He-was oblieed to walk more than a mile, to procure, assistance, and at the end of the journey fell down exhausted from loas of blood. A"vory painful accident happened on Saturday, May 13, to a boy named Robinson, the; son of a fisherman, under the following cirr' cumetances -—The little fellow visited the '. Shortland sawmill about 2 o'clock in quest q£ : chips and sticks for firing purposes. After securing a quantity of material he was ] seized with a desire to enter tho upper storey of the building, and endeavoured to do bo by ; crawling through an' opening leading from , the ground floor. He had succeeded in getting his head and shoulders through'the ! aperture when tho' man in charge of the , .breaking.-downi saw reversed the gear, and the carriage ran swiftly back in order to start, another flitch. Just at that npment the youngster's head popped up above the floor, and beforeho was observed one end of thecarriage came in contact with the head, and stripped tho scalp. Fortunately the sawyer had perfect control over the! machinery at the time', and succeeded in stop'pirig: the ■ log bed immediately ho saw the position of affairs, otherwise the stull would jnost assuredly have been crushed/ to pieces. ,Tho sufferer was removed without delay to the , hospital, where his injuries were promptly attended to by Dr. Caflan and the dispenser. -' On the 14th May Mr. Thomas Wallnutt, of the Union Bank of AustralU, was driving to Ngariiawahia. When about half-waj- between that place and Hami/ton the horse became restive, and the tilbury which he was driving was capsized, atfi he was thrown violently to the ground. ,The horse broke away, and was caught byyMr. Alexander a milo further on the road. Mr. Alexander returned to the spot and found Mr. Wallnutt lying on tho ground with' one of his anklen broken. He was brought into Hamilton about 12 o'clock, and wa3 attended by both Drs. Edyelow and Boale. The ankle is uot only smashed, but the leg severely cut in more than one place. These wouuds were sewed up by Dr. Edgelow at once, but the fracture was not reduced until later in the evening by Dr. Beale. About 11 a.m. on Tuesday, May 16, while Mr. Reynolds, of N6rth Shore, was walking along the beach between Mr. Stark's new building aud Narroir Neck, which is situated between the North Head arid Takapuna Lake, ho observed a dead body lying amongst the rocks. . Immediately upon seeing it he went over to lodgo information with the Itevonport police constable, but finding him absent on duty, proceeded to Mr. Mays' store, and sent a telephonic communication of the circumstance to tho Auckland Police Office. Sergeant Martin, of the Water. Polico, was at once advised, aud started by tie 2 o'clock steamer for tho North -Shore. • From tho appearanco of the remains, tho clothing, and size of body, Sergeant Martin at once concluded that they wore those of a young man named R. J. Hunter, who had been missing since Tuesday evening. May 9. The body was conveyed to the Flagstaff Hotel, Devonport, and secured in one of the out-houses. A small notebook, a letter-wallet, miscellaneous papers, tivo shillings in silver, and a few coppers were found, all of which proved tho identity of tho remains. A Coroner's inquisition into tho circumstances was held on May 17 at the Flagstaff Hotel, Devonport, before Dr. Philsou, Coroner, and a jury, of whom Mr. James Gerrard waa foreman. Lengthy evidenco was taken, after which tho jury brought iri'an opon verdict of "Found Drowned." On "tho 17th May, Mr; Foster, proprietor of tho Now Zealand Boot Factory, Greystreet, reported at the police station, the doa»h of his brother-in-law, Mr. Silas Allbonos, under tho following singular circumstances : On Sunday, May .14, Mr. Allbonos obtaining a horse from Mr. Foster, with whom he resides, went out to visit Onehangn. On th» road out to Newmarkot, he rell off the horse, but did not hurt himself, out on passing Mr. Gwynnc's Epsom Hotel, suddenly swerved, and tho man fell oror its head, on to theroad, cuttinghisheadontheleft side. The wounded man was raised up by thoso who witnessed the accident, but as he was a stranger to them all they did not know where to tako him. Fortunately Mr. A. Elliott, of Poneonby, happened te bo returning from a visit to his friends at Onehtinga, and ho at once recognised Mr. Allbones. Tho only vehicle at hand, a dray, was at oncQ got ready, and the wounded man takou by Mr. Elliott to tho Provincial Hospital, where Elliott states tho wounds wero dreased by Dr. Philson. Thoy did uot seem to be regarded as serious, for Mr. Allbones was sent away in tho dray to Mr. Foster's private residence, Great North-road, near Mr. Errington's place, with an injunction that he could come back on Tuesday, to see how the cuts were getting on. On the arrival of the injured man, in charge of Mr. Klliott, at Mr. Foster's residence, ho was at once put to bed and attended to by his sister, Mrs. Poster, Mr. Foster assisting. During the night, towards morning. Mr. Allbonea became unconscious, and, as soon as possible, Mrs. Foster went for Dr. Walker, who arrived, and, after examination of the patient, said he Mas suffering from concussion of the brain. On Wednesday morning Dr. Richardson was called in, anil after consultation with Dr. Walker, they informed Mr. and Mrs. Foster that they could hold out littlo or no hopes of Mr. Allbones' recovery. He gradually sank during the day, never having recovered consciousness, and died in the evening, about half-past five o'clock. Mr. Allbones was a fine young man, of about 1!) years of ago, and had only been in the province about three months. He is a native of Great Grimsby, Lincolnshire, whero his relatives aro now residing. An inquest was hold on May 19, when a verdict of "Accidental death" was returned, and no blame was attached to anyone. A young man named William Sanson, employed at Messrs. Gan-ett Brothers' tannery, at the Whau, met with severe injuries on Wednesday, May 17. Mr. Sanfon, while employed at his ordinary avocations, dropped into a boiling vessel used for boiling the tanning bark, and was severely scalded from the thighs downwards. Ho iras at onco treated with such remedies as icere available, and than taken to his home. Hβ is suffering acute pain, and on Thursday medical attendance was procured for him.

1 ./•';■■ I VvFIRES. / . Tho/handsome residence of Mr. J. B. ! W,hyte,.,M\ll:.R.fbr i Waikato/ was burned 'to'the'grouiid;late;_on the 2Gth April,' The uJreioccurreel about 9"* p.m., and origin'ateii mMMr. ;Whyte's-dressing room, in wljich it;: 13 supposed that ..two candles usually placed "on the' nyintlcslfelf had "beod left burning. The attention of the inmates was drawn to the;' smell of burn-ing,'-and on- opening {ho door. .of tho. room in question it was found, to, bo .filled with flames, tho firo having takea.a firm .hold of the walls and coiliug. JSflorts were made, but without effect, to atop the progress of the fira, and seeing this yas impossible, no further timo waa lost in getting tho children, who were asleep in bed, to a place of safety, and saving a few necessary articles of clothing. Thero was time for but littlo mors, as withia a few" minutes the smoke and heat presented iugrcse to the building, and in a quarter of an hour from the bursting forth of the flames, tho house waa a glowing mass of embers. Mr. Whyto will bo a heavy loser in valuable paintings, curios, and this thousand and one articles in a large household whjch money cannot replace. Thoresidenco was insured in tho South British foi- £1500, and thofurniture for£l9oo. This will not cover the/loss by fully £1000. It has been noif placed beyond doubt that the firo which destroyed Mr. J. B. Whyte'a house.on Wednesday, April 26, did not occur, as Buppflsod, in the dressing-room, ■whore it was firjtdiscovored, but on tho roof. Immediately \yhon Mr. Whyte found that tho dressing-room was on fire, ho roused up a servant man, who was in an adjoining outhouao, and the man's first act was to firo off a gun, by wa/ of giving tho alarm. The report of the jon was heard by a person who had somo time previously started from Mr. Bradley's residence, and had to travel across tho flat towards Hokonui, and turning round to' see whence the report proceeded, ho' saw the roof of Mr. Whyto's hoiiso in flames. Tho.inference is that the shingles became ignited by a spark from the kitoheu ihininey, and that the flames firat forced tboir way into that part of tho house, a central one, where the dressing-room was situated. This will account for tho rapidity with w/iich, immediately after tho firo waa discovered, tho house, in all parts became filled jnth dense amoke, and the flames took suddenly hold of the ontire building. The interior of tho greater portion of tho roof was doubtless in flameii when the dressiiig-rooin was; first found to be on fire, and in a very short timo afterwards the firo would burst through the ceilings of tho aeveral rooms almost simultaneously. Unfortunately, tho house was shiueled. At the timo it was oiilt, the specification provided that it s/iould bo roofed with slates, but there were jono at that time procurable in Auckland, ind tho specificatiou was altored to allow shingles to be used. 1 A houso waa burned at Hellier's Creek on April 28 under somewhat peculiar circumstances. Tho wifo of a labouring man, a half-casto woman, eloped with another labouring man, proceeding to Hokianga, whore tho woman's relations reside. They camo back to East Tamaki from Hokianga, whither they wero followed by the iajured husband. They fixed their abode in a raupo wharo. Tho husband had built a good weather-board house upon a small fan ■: of .50 acres which ho had acquired. In order that tho wifo and her paramour should never havo tho benefit of his labour, he is reported to have burned the house to th» ground. , Tho house occupied by the family of Mr. David Lindsay, i'apakura, Wis totally destroyed by firo on Friday, May 12. Mr. Liudsay is at present living in Auckland, engaged on tho new dock, his family remaining at Papakura. On Friday ;morning, about five, Mrs. Lindsay got up, lit the lamp (a korosene one), left it on the table, arid having lit tho fire, went to her bedroom to complete her toilet. She had but gone in when, hearing an explosion, she rushed out, acd found the lamp had burst upon the table, the oil had run down on the floor, and the flames had caught the brushwood, kept for kindling fires, and thence to the house. The fire spread so rapidly that Mrs; Lindsay had but time to get the children out of bed and escape before the house was completely enveloped in flames. Nothing was saved but two or three blankets. LAW. His Honor Mr. Justice Gillies has been at the Court of Appeal in Wellington for the past week. On hia way thither he held tbs ordinary quarterly circuit court for gaol delivery at New Plymouth (Taranaki). His addi-Ass Uiere to tliß grand jury hoa caused a good deal of comment. There were two Maori prisoners to be tried under "The ■West Coast Settlements Act." They were arrested in the ordinary way. His Honor held, however, that the officers making the arrest should have "special authority from the Governor in order to comply with the Act." Two questions have arisen out of this direction to tho grand jury—first, whether his Honor was right in directing the grand jury upon a matter of law which would have the effect of releasing the prisoners without trial, tho charge against them involving issues of fact as well as law, and before the prisoners were called upon to plead to the indictment; second, whether iri the interpretation of tho Act the authority of a Minister of the Crown (the Native Minister) was not sufficient authority for the arrest. The whole matter will probably be the subject of interpellation during the session of the General Assembly just commenced. The superior courts iu Auckland are for the present closed, and there is no business doing, except in some small bankruptcy cases. His Honor tho District Judge (Mr. J. E, Macdonald) has gone to Wellington in his capacity of member of the Judicature Commission. Captain Jackson, of the Waikato, has taken his place. There have been two absconding bankrupts. One was a man named Simon Peter Harjes, an agent, who left the colony very suddenly with a* largo sum of money belonging to his principal. This man, by means of the telegraph, was stopped in Adelaide, and he is now dn his way back to Auckland in custody of the polico. The other was a builder and contractor, named Charles Kiiik.Chatwin. This man decamped with moneys due to his subcontractors to tho amount »f between £3000 and £4000. Both cases are very bad. The second man has not yet been arrested. It is to bo hoped that he may be caught, for the speedy and thorough punishment of two such men would have a good effect by making warning examples for such evil-doers. MUSIC AND DRAMA. Until last week, when we were fivoured with a visit from the Mendelssohn Quintette Club, there was a groat dearth of amusement of any kin:l except private or amateur theatricals. Such performances havo always an immunity from criticism. The least said about them is always beat; there is always in them an admixture of the good, bad. and indifferent. But tho "Quintette Club" awakened us to a new appreciation of music. Nothing lould bo more- delicate o- finished than some of their performances. They have !>eeu giving programmes of classic music ; but these numbers of tho programme havo boon interwoven with very l-eautiful melodies and popular airs, played with variations, which always liils public senti- j mont. Wo may now congratulate ourselves j upon tho possession of an Opera House (a brand-new building, erected by Mr. H. N\ Abbott), to be opened-to-morrow by Mr! Williamson and his company with Gilbert and Sullivan's comic opera "Patience." The tickets for tho subscription season are nearly all taken. Everything foretells a prosperous time to thd new house for a considerable period after its opening. MASONIC. At the regular meeting of Lod-o -\ra 1.C.. held on the Ist of Muy. tho following brethren wero eluded to iill the various oflkers for the ensiling year :-Brothers A. Wri-ht, W.M.; J. B. Crothcrs, I.P.M - C S. Western, S.W.; O. l>. Powley, J.\V.\ J K. Hanr.a, S.D.; S. O. Hanua. J.D.- \ Kuld, 1.U.: Brothers Eaton and Vosper Stewards; the Rev. Dr. Kidd, Chaplain; \V. J. Rees, Secretary; and W. L. Mitchell Treasurer. Brother Pierce, the R.W.U.G.M.) was present, and congratulated the W.M'i' Brother CroMiers, on the way in which the lodge was worked. There was a very lai-'c ittendunce of brethren, and marked interest was manifested iu the election. The officers elected will be installed next month. The annual meeting of the Lodi;e Rodney 1711. E.C., was held in the lodge-room Warkworth Hotel, on Thursday evening, May 4. Notwithstanding the very unfavour atile state of the weather, there was a good attendance of members, and the following brethren from Auckland :—G. W. GossotT W.M., 1335, E.G.; W. B. Jackson, 1801. K.C., R.A.C.; W. H- Skinner, P.M., KttS KG; James Maekio, 41S, 1.C.; J. L. Hatsl well, T., GS9, E.C.; M. S. Leers, P.M., 042; Richard Edward Graham, S., 417, S.C. The general business of tho evening having been gone through, the whole retired to Brother C. Thomson's, where a banquet was provided, after which all returned to the lodge for tho purpose of installing the

W.M/, and'iaveating oiScers for the ensuing year.! Brother P.M., acted as .Installing Muter, andvßrother W. J. South-tat;e,iW.M:r-erect, wjwJduly installed W.M. ■BritherCiXljomson&r!, P.M.: E. Richards, S.WJ;k ilelville, S.W.; E. G. Clements! S.D.;. In,!. Gilsheriah, J.D.; J. Darrach, Treasurer (third, time); M. W. Munro, eccretary (third time) ; W. Somervillc, 1.G.; WrWedding, tyler (fourth time). Marked interest was ■: manifested throughout the whole, proceedings, and the address to the .W.M. and- the several oflice bearers was given by Brother Moat, in an impressive and solemn manner. After the ceremony the usual loyal and Masonic toasts were gi\<en and ably responded to. On the following morning Brother Skinner produced the plan of the proposed new Masonic Hall, and, in company with the Building Committee, inspected several sites offered, but nothing definite waa decided on. FRIENDLY SOCIETIES. The nineteenth anniversary of }.h». Hopejof Auckland Tent, 1.0. R., was celebrated on April 2G by a soiree and musical entertainment, in the Temperance Hall, Albert-street. There was a very large attendance, uoth of tho members of the adult and juvenile tents and thoir friends. After tea, Mr. W. Coleman '.',ook the chair, and delivered a brief and appropriate address. Mr. Hetnus addressed the meeting on " Rechabitism" and its advantages. Songs, readings, and recitations were then given by members of tho society and others. The following is the main portion of the annual report, as read by Mr. J. G. Carr, secretary :—" I have the honour to report on the position of the Hope of Auckland Tent, 1.0., on the 19th year of its existence. We numberon our roll 114 members in good standing, and we have two others proposedformembership. Ourfuudsstand at—Sick fund, .-€597 19a 4d ; and the funeral fund, in which -we have an interest, £1370. We have a juvenile tent in cenoection with us, supervised by two of our brethren, numbering 42 niemberfc. Brothers J. W. Foster and Edward Waring have thrown themselves heartily into the work. We meet fortnightly on the Ist and 3rd Thuradays in each month in St. James's Hall, Wellingtonstreet—juveniles at 7 and adults at S p.m. Our benefits are doctor and in«licino immediately on joining for self and family, and 10s 6d per week during sickness that occurs after eb: months from joining, and 25s per week after twelve months for fiftytwo woeks, and 10s 6d after that term for as long as Bickness lasts (blindnees and insanity to be considered sickness). Funeral gift of £21 10s 10d in case of wife's death." A Wairoa correspondent writes :—",An open meeting in connection with thel.O.G.T., Hope of the Wairoa. Lodge, No. 8, took place in the Publie Hall here on Wednesday evening, May 3, and, although the weather was unpropitious, the meeting was quite a success in every -way. The hall was comfortably well filled, and the surrounding districts of Papakura, Drury, Hunua, Ness Valley, and Taupo districts were well represented. The W.C.T. of the lodge presided, and a lengthy programme was gone through very creditably, Mra. and Mr. Kumbal, Miss and Mr. F. Creighton, and Mrs. Waterson being encored. The following ladies and gentlemen also took part: —Misses McCakill, Spence, Gillespie, Wilson (3), Messrs. John, Creighton, D. J. Scott,'and J. R. Wilson." The: following officers of the Samaritan Lodge, No. 8, New Zealand Order of Good Templars wtire installed in office on the Isth May by IBro. D. Goldie, Executive-Presi-dent, assisted by Brc. Willoox, Installing Secretary, Bro. Clifford, J.M.,aud Bro. Marson, J.D.M.:—P.W.C.T., Sis. Minuiiam, sen.; W.C.T., Bro. Mincham ; W.V.T. and L.D., Bro. Syms ; W.S., Bro. Davson ; W.A.S. Bro. W. JDavey-; W.P.S.. Sis. J. Leitham, W.T., Sis. Kelloor; W.C., Bro. H. Townsend; W.M., Bro. McConnel.', jun.; W.D. M., Sis. A. Mincham; W.1. (J., Bro. T. Townsend; W.0.G., Bro. Wheeler; W.R. H.S., Sis. J. Francis ; W.L:H.S., Sis. B. Leitham. AQUATICS. The annual meeting of the members of the Ponaonby Regatta Club -a-as held on Saturday, May 6, at the Ponsonby Club Hotel. There was a fair attendance of members, and Mr. J. Cunningham occupied the chair. The treasurer's balance-sheet was submitted to the meeting, and WS3 received favourably. It showed the total amount of receipts for the year to be £150 3s M, as against £05 14s 3d, the former year's receipts. Out" of the latter amount the sum of £46 7s had been paid away in prizes, while thie "year that amount hoe been more than doubled,' the amonnt paid away in prizes being £99. A sum of £49 l!)s lid has been expended in connection with the late regatta and business connected with it, making the total amount of expenditure for the past year £148 19n lid, thus showing a balance to the good of £1 Ss 4d, and with £10 Is 3d which was brought forward from last year's balance-sheet the club has at the present time £11 10s 7d standing, to their credit to be carried forward to next year. Officebearers for the ensuing" year were not elected, on account of the absence of some of the principal members, and it was. decided that a meeting for that purpose should be i called about the beginning of October next. Votes of thanks were accorded to Captain McGregor for the use of the sis. Wellington as flagship on regatta day, to Captain Farquhar for his services as starter, and to all those who had presented the club with the trophies which were competed for at th« rogatta. It was also agreed that Mr. F. A. Jones should be presented with a testimonial in recognition of his uutiriiif labours as secretary of the club ; and it -was decided that the committee should meet next Saturday night and present him with a valuable gold ring, bearing a suitable inscription. pedestr:ianism. O'Brien, the Australian champion's attempted feat of covering 75 miles in 12 hours took place at the Lome-street Hall on Saturday, commencing at 11 a.m. and finishing at 11 p.m., at which time he hid completed 05 miles and 17 laps. When half the time had elapsed, he had tho feat well in hand, but after that time he seemed to fail, his failure being in a great measure attributable to a nasty blow received by falling at ono of the corners, which rendered °iim insensible for a short time. The hall was duly surveyed by Messrs. Boylau and Lnndon, who certified that 32 laps were necessary to complete the mile. O'Brien attributes his lailure to the fact of the smallness of the hall, the constant turning of the corners being a heavy strain on the tendons of his legs, and the fact of his being very weak from_ illness up to the time appointed for starting. He is ([uite confident of bciuc.iblc to accomplish the feat under more favourable conditions. There was a large attendance during the day and evening, about 1000 having paid for admission. OBITUARY. Very peueral regret was ielt in town when the tidings circulated on the 27th of April that Mr. George Aickin, civil engineer, had dropped down dead at his residence, Epsom, of heart disease. He was encaged in the morning, about 9.80, in sawiuu some wood within view of his wife-n couple of minutes I J liter, on going to the yard, she found him prone on the grcund. Her first impulse was to raise him up, and on discovering that he was de*d, Mrs. Aickin called for help. A neighbour, Major Lambert, came over promptly, and helped her to remove the body of her husband into the dwelling. Dr. Goldsbro' was sent for, and speedily arrived, but could <lo nothing more than pronounce life extinct. Mr. Aickin was (i 0 years of age, and was in tiie enjoyment apparently of j-ood health. The cause of death was heart disease, and Dr. Goldsbro , , who lintl previous knowledge of the deceased, was of opinion an inquest was unnecessary. Mr. AieUin leavefi a family, some of whom am grown up. One sou is in the Auckland Vost-ofHce Department, and another in the otiice of Messrs. Boylau and Luudon, engineers. The deceased had a very extensive experience in his profession, both at Home aud in the colonies. Thirty years nuo be won the premium for a design of a"n institution for the Blind, in Birmingham. He subsequently emigrated to this coiouy, and hell' an important appointment under the Pro viiici.il Government of Canterbury. From Christchurch he removed to "Auckland some years ago, and came into public notice in connection with the dock controversy, in which ho took an active part. He was the author of various dock schemes for this harbour, and of plans for widening Hobsonstrect and cutting <!own the point opposite Gleeson's hotel; also, of throwing a suspension bridge over the cemetery pull}', to connect Symoiuls-stteet with Graf ton-road <listrict. He was occasionally employed in tho City Surveyor's ofh'cD when there was a press of work, and supervised the improvements in Albert Park. Latterly he acted as consulting engineer to various Highway Boards and County Councils. He was so well known that the tidings of his appallingly sudden death will be received with feelings of general regret. I

5 Thomas Bird, collector luTTuT^ 2s^ ■ resident died in the hos'piS H^ 6 *** ■ He has been in the hospital for °? Apn! 2*. • past The cause of death . It will be seen from our ohhaT , elsewhere that Captain F Wβ I* n °t>ce . the 13th ft cgt ., died at Jlkateton « ton, on tho 2nd :nst H» J- ' filinga appointed clerk to the.R.M (w l,l " I *!'/ 1 kura, a post whhli he held for S Z> f '- e In our obituary column will 5? i" I*-1 *- « the death of Mr. H. M™tm $" * ©Wj ? of Napier. Air. White w-Lf , "!*V i Auckland, and the aixth son of H,^ 6 « » T. A. White, who was los? inVhe ai;eilr- ; Kate, with all hands, off 'he eU^ 5 many years ago. The cle. isased articles with Mr William C**"* laud and was subsequently with Mr P of Napier, but commenced busuW„ ?' •t own account a year or two ago u?d e . J* a tavour,ible auspices. Hβ had 0 * ■ what is Known as the Napi er {„-* Kkea ;. while recovering therefrom, was smtS f inflammation of the luii-ra Atff >- * s were entertained of hi 3 recover? W • F* i- enfeebled state he was ill-prepared t *" hU f tho fell disease, and he died ou WedL?' !t - May 3. at tho early age of *? ™***£ 1 was a young manof genial dirpoaition » j - gavo ovory prospect of runuing " 0 career. His untimely death will v Mfu! e resetted by a large circle of / acquaintances in Auckland. ' ' s 1 e We regret to record in our ol>itu ary „.„ e the decease, after a short illnras iS?* f Robert John Hunter, eldest ,»' °r J^ ■ William Hunter, and member of tLfiL r ; s Hunter and Nolan, auctioneers ff of : up to Waikatoon Wednesday 28t)T***' 1 to visit his father, who resides at fuT j. On Saturday he went out for a drive toT " adjacent settlements, and on returning, J * .- plained that the cold wind had .Sf"' r pain in his chest, but he still went ikt * e usual. On Tuesday last he ■- the Waikato tram, accompanied bv h' n mother, to his residence, Ellers'lie feisT ■ languid and unwell, but no symptom, it ■ seuting themselves of a character to riT - uneasiness to himself or hia family. &I* , day, however, it was deemed advisable to cS t in medical advice, inflammation of the'luc i developed itself, and, ■notwithstanding thl - attention of his medical attendant he .m r cumbed to tho attack at half.past '] o'clock -I on Sunday, May 7. Mr. Hunier wii a i~C 1 f mising young man, and his untimely, dp' il at the early age of 35, will be regretted ova a large number of friends aud others who haj , been engaged in busiuess relations with iA. e Ho was married to a daughter of Ui K! - Lambert, of Epsom, by whom he had oneson s and these are left to mourn their loa' - The funeral took place on Tuesday fre™ y his residence near the Harp of Erit f KHerslie. The great respect in nhick 1 Mr. Hunter was held was in some den»» e manifested by the large a.rti.jt. The line of Y carriages extended nearly from the SUrp of • Erin Hotel to Mr. Dilworth's residence ud '.. at Kyber Pass a large number on foot joined • the procession, making it almost the .largest £ funeral that has ever taken place in Anck- . land. The Rev. T. Buddie read a portion of • the service in the house before the fnnenl started, and the Rev. J. WalJis Jed in 1 prayer. The chief mourners w»re Mr. AYtf. I liam Hunter (father of deceased) and tjj i sons, Major Lambert (father-in-law of - deceased), aad Mr. JNolan (of tha firm of • Hunter and Nolan). At the' grave, wbick. 1 was in tho general cemetery,:the lUt. T ; Buddie read the service, and. the fier/.W. C. , Oliver prayed. All the mettbers of'deceated'e family were present a'.i ths obsequies. Mr. , Halliday, to whom was entrusted the con- ■ duct of the obsequies, .display ml taste and feel- • ing, and the deceased yJung gentleman was • committed to his final iome a-iiid the'sincere ■ regrets of a vary largeeirele of friends, mam - of whom could scarcely realise the fact that he wae only a diy or two previoudv amongst them in hcilth and spirits, and ttib now consigned to tiat bourae from which li* 2 traveller returns. - ''.-■'-. We. received news fro:n Fiji recording ihs . death of Mr. E. T Woolcott; an old settler at 1 Bau, who recenty died there of inflammation . oithelunga. JL-. WoolcottwasspVmter, and I it will be remenbered was in Ancklaad some . tame ago, duimg, which his son wa| r murderously usaulted by their. Fijian ser--3 vant, Joe, at tbeir lodgings,- UoUeby-strwt, : and a man jained I{ees also murdered ly i him on thi New North Eoid, for which t crimes he b now condemned to impriicn- '- ment for life in Mount ilr. l Wooleott had lately been at Suva, int rei turned to Bau. He hadHaken a cold, which • culminated in inflammation of the.lungs, I dairying him off at tha age of -18. HU r daughter, iged 17, was finishing her edso- : tion at St. Mary's Convent Boarding School, i but her relatives, on the decease of her s father, desired her return to Fiji, and Mi». : Woolcott leavea by the Taiaroa on her Ost- ) ward trip. , : We regret to have to Ghronicle in our I obituary column to-day, the death of Mr. f W. Wiight, for'many years manager of Miv I David Nathan's farm, near Howick. H» : had been ailing for Bom». time, but his dnmise was not expected ao soon, and will Ui regretted by a large circle of friends, as well t as by his employer. was chairman' of the i local highway board, and took a great interest > in all matters contemic.J the welfare .of the i district, and his death trill cause a blank not : easily to be filled. Mr. David Clements, licensee o£ the Bhck i Bull Hotel, Albert-street, and formerly of ; the Crown Hotel, Grey-street, diedon tin i 10th May at his residence after a prolonged ; illness. - l Another old identity ;has passed a*>F • in the person of Michael Hancey, wbo has resided at Motukaraka, opposite Herat Point, for many years past. He was 92 years of age, and had lived in New Zealand ■ for more than 50 years. He used to assert ! that lie was the first c'jild boru of European . free parents in the colony of New So"" 1 Wales. Ho had been very feeble and decrepit for some time past, bat'hie mental ! powers were apparently unimpaired, andh« could spin some very interesting yarns of ih* old times when in a-communicative mood. He leaves beliind him a Maori widow and » ; number of descendants, down to great grandchildren. i Mr. James Waldie, the; old msn wlofcil down Mr. Ewiugtou's stairs some timeifs died at the hospital at 7 a.m. on M»J "• Everything was done for him which v possible, but being an old man he gradual)/ sank, and succumbed as stated. He had. been in a good position in England Ml* : years ago, and usod to drive in his ov."n - ■ riage to business in the eity. hut on comroj; ! out hero he never established himself- i» : was an exceedingly well-read man, and com ! recite lengthy passages from' Shakesp-"^ , . I Byron, ami some of the old English classse.. He- had no relative* in .-lucklaud, tolamll)" being in Brisbane. MISCELLANEOUS. , The n;inio given by Tawhiao to the bntlg' which spaus the Wuipa between Ale*an<W and tho King Country—Tawhara-3?ai-Attt»-is sonicv.-h.it puzzling, and the news lro» the upper oouutry gives us no cine to to meaiiing. The word "kai" moans ioMand " Atau " is the Maori wonl for IXW. The tawhnra is the dower of the kiekie, ana it is also a sweet aud delicious food, foantt in plenty iu the depths of the forest. I*" whiao probably means that the tawhara, being a product of nature, and not the tneci of cultivation, is a food offered by W*' which may be had by men free and witnw* Inborn-. it will bo with the bndg« f which will be there for the convenience oi whoever may want it. Therefore it is 6tm that the bridge should be called "Tawhara-. kai-Atun." _ „ The Art Exhibition in the Cl.oralflajT »* i brou s ht to a close on April 26. . I""] was a large company present, and a BnD .» evening Mr. Impey's barn.', played at mva vale. °rhe Kxh'bitiou *«- '•«•- tcmlcl since the opoiog, iOiJ tho ind all connected with it are to be conpa™, UtJ on (hi: success which has atten'W their efforts. The money taken at the dew ~,,d for the sale of catalogues during the b « divs the Exhibition has been open amouniw to nearly £100, and the saluof pictures, including tiie art union drawing, reaU» .-.bout £ ? SOO. Mr. Blomheld and Mr. » Martin have been tho mo.st the exhibitors in disposing o: their Nearly the whole of the fortr.or gentlemffl hive Teen purchased, those sedd realm"? , total of about £SO. The thanks of the c*. mitt>:e and members of the society are Mr. J. Martin, the honorary the iudefatiuable manner ia wlncn laboured to unsure the success of the t3g bition. The duties of Ins office have <? r manded a groat deal of time, and troo'*' which have Ijteu cheerfully given, witi" ,, "ratifying result we have recorded. " The tunnel on the Kawakawa railwayß* - for which Mr. Larkins is contractor, WJ, Jj through on tho 2Gth April. The lenF,! the tunnel is 2SO feet, and the time of &fij it (three months) is the shortest in «J? such a work has ever been accomplisWv the province, taking into consideration

f 1 ' 8 TSS Tμ and will enable the eon- ** weeks should abw see the contract comDid premises of Messrs. Canning, roldwiiir"-wia Chapman are in process of Spoiled down, preliminary to erecting new an?, substantial places of business.- Good S were obtained privately for the.stuff wfcich will be used in the construction of Abuses elsewhere. The accepted tender for the erection of Mr. Canning's new bmldtugs ]?that of Mr. Jenkinson, at £2SBO. For the premises Qf Messrs. Chapman and Goldstar that of Messrs. Jones aud Pollard, at £1122, g£ been accepted. There were seven ten- - dera, ranging from the above figure to £12te. "Mr. James Wilson, formerly of the Auckland staff of the New Zealand Insurance <3ompany, but who was appointed to a branch agency on the West Coast from which he was subsequently removed to a similar appointment at Nelson, is at present on a visit to Auckland, on leave of absence. Aa eight years have elapsed since he was here Before, he was greatly struck with the change and progress effected in Auckland. . : It is reported that Mr. Raynes, of Cam- , •bridge, is the purchaser of a town acre in Kihikibi, late the property of Mr. Mandere. The belief that that township wiU be the seat <>f future Land Courts, has caused town sections to be somewhat eagerly inquired for lately. The price given by Mr. Raynes has not transpired. ■ . The foundation stone of the new premises in Qaeen-street of the Auckland Savings Bank was laid on Thursday, May 11, by Mr. David Nathan, vice-president, in the presence of a large and influential company. Mr. Daldy, one of the trustees of the bank, gave an interesting sketch of its progress, and said that its''original promoters were Mr. J. J. Montifeore, ■ Mr. Brown, Dr. ■Campbell, Dr. Sinclair, and Mr. Shepherd. The first depositor was Mr. Matthew Fleming, aa old identity, and the deposits the first year of its existence only amounted to Hl.' They now reached Sho largo sum of £228,000. The financial position of the bank ; 'was- thoroughly sound, and its operations were rapidly increasing. The management of the bank washighly satisfactory, and there jeemed every likelihood of a long career of prosperity before it. The Hon. P. Dignan attributed much of the success of the bank to the good mothers and thrifty wives of Auckland, and hoped it would prove as prosperous in the fatnre as it had done in past. A bottle, containing some particulars oTthe bank, the names of the president, vice-president, trustees, , &c.; together with ' copies of. - the Auckland daily papers, itid the "various coins of the realm, was placed in a cavity underneath the foundation • 'srtoie which was then declared to be well r »rid truly laid, by Mr. D. Nathan, who was presented on the occasion with a, eilver trowel by Mr:"".Heron, the builder, and with-a pnriri mallat by Mr. Bartley, the •jrchitejt. Dr: Campbell and the Rev. T. . Saddle having-addressed a few words to ■ those present, the interesting proceedings .: .terminated.: . . ';.... . ■•--- -The Auckland Oil Company'-will shortly • enter into new premises on the reclamation 'at'the foot Of Albert-street, which are at ''■■'- pwient being erected for them under the ' supervision of Mr. Krrington, C.E. Some 'time, ago the manager of the company distributed 1561b5. of castor oil beans to country aectlera, ■so that they; might cultivate the ; bean.-ths company.being a. purchaser for all produced'. The only return hae been some lOlbs.'of bescs, and the manager in now Satisfied that the castor oil bean cannot be ' grown profitably for purposes of commerce. Tie supply of peanuts from the Fiji group, ■used for making peanut oil, is also very irregular and: uncertain, and a supply of peanuts have beea tent to Tonga, in order to ■ tieeif the natives os that island will enter upon the steady cultivation of that article of ieommerce. : .-■'.-.■. - Mr. John Lamb, of the Waitemata Mills, Riverhead, has forwarded to the Exhibition at Christcnurch a sample of Auckland grown -'-' -wheat.' Hβ has sent two bushels, put up in "'very neatly-made kauri cases. One of the bushels was grown by Nγ. John Taylor, of Otihahu, and weighed • (Blhs. per bushel, and formed part of a \cro{ that yielded 42 ..bushels per acre. The other bushel was grown by Messrs. T. _ an« S. Morrin at . Remuera, and. weighed 65J)bs. per biifieJ, and formed part of acrop vhose yield was -at the rate of 45 bushels jer acre. Mr. lamb is-afraid he has beea too long in forwarding it'to have any chance of a prize, but the samples will, at any rate, show that .wheat of superior quality can be grown in ,~ the Auckland-province. Both bushels were of -tneTuscaii variety. - The first pile of the bridge across the Waipa River* leading into the King Country, -. was driven on the '26th April by Tawhiao, ' the Maori King!-, Tawhiao, all things being prepared, struck .v'pile already placed in position, three times, saying, "First, This is my bridge. I name it Tawh,ara Kai Atna. Second, Let tb.e railway come to Alexandra ; this will help ; a pall, a pull, a pull. . Third stroke, That is ail." Three hearty cheers . were then givfin, and good wishes exchanged ;.pver a glass of wine by Tawhiao and the • chiefs. Those present wished success to the Mr. McLean. From the Ist of April, 1857, to the 31st •iMarch last, there was exported from New -Zealand .9,569,2G60z5. of gold, worth £38,502,025. The quantities and values -from the several provinces were as 'follow:—Auckland, 1,535,5580z5., worth ' ;£4,{!17 1 750; Wellington, Siozs., worth '■'£sM'i Marlborou'gh, • 49,7970z5., worth £152,023; Nelson, 1,630,2330z5., worth "£6,in,595.; West Q.ast, 2,733,0220z5., - worth £10,694,002 ; Otago and Southland, ■t,120,6220z5., worth £16,226,458. :' The work in connection with the new large ;: graving dock at Calliope Point, on the north ihore of Auckland Harbour, is being pushed ; rapidly ahead. The first section of the work ■•. is completed, and the second section will jhortly be tendered for. The dock is intended to be from'6oo to 700 feet in length, . »ud to have a depth of water on the sill of 32 or 33 feet. It is intended to be large enough . to take in the largest man-of-war or merchant »hip that may visit Auckland. ■; Mr. J. C. Firth, of Matamata, is going to , t ttt an example to the settlers of what may .be done in the development of a muchneglected industry in country districts— bee-keeping.. He is about to make a start with 300 hives, 100 of which will be Ligurian bees, and has engaged the services of the well-known apiarist, Mr. Hopkins, of ■the Thames. An icstance of the advancement of the native race at Raglan is to be found in their . enterprise in milling. A second flour mill is to be. erected for Hone te One, at Pauwewe, Kawhia. It will be built by subscriptions raised amongst the Maoris living in Kawhia and Aotea, and a boat is also to be built for them to transport the flour to the various settlements on the shores of the harbour. ."." The directors of the Auckland Coffee Palace Company have duly approved of the plans . of (die Coffee Palace, prepared subject to their instructions bj' Messrs. Keals and Sons, architects, and have decided to • call for tenders, and commence building operations '■ at an early date.

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OUR HOME LETTER., New Zealand Herald, Volume XIX, Issue 6399, 22 May 1882

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OUR HOME LETTER. New Zealand Herald, Volume XIX, Issue 6399, 22 May 1882

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