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THE ELECTIONS.

NEWTON. Mu. W. Swa.vsox was yesterday returned for the foarth time unopposed for Newton. The election took place at the Ponsonby—Mr. J. J. Dickson being the Returning Mr. T. T. Masefield proposed Mr. Swanson. He had had occasion to be in Wellington during last session, and he had had opportunity of seeing how zealously Mr. Swanson attended to his duties, both in the House ana on committees. Mr. J. H. iiEi.D seconded the nomination, here being no other candidate, the Kbtorning Offickr declared Mr. Swanson duly elected. (Cheers.) Mr. Swanson thanked them for the very hinh honour paid him in .returning him for the fourth time unopposed. Ererything connected with the district, or auy business which the local bodies would entrust him with, would receive his best attention, fr rom the speeches of Major Atkinson and Mr. Hall, it would seem that they ! were desirous of reducing the amount spent on education, and placing the cost on the localities or the parents. That he (Mr. Ssvanson) would resist. From the speech of Mr. Hall, it would seem that he did not care - to tell what the measures were which the Government proposed. He (Mr. Swanson) rather suspected one of them was as to how the poor should be maintained. They would try to saddle the charge upon the localities. That would bear uncommonly hard upon this isthmus, where the poor and 3ick came from all quarters. That matter would have to be carefully watched. A good deal wag said about the "bursting up" of large estates. He would be glad to see that done. He did not see why a man had power to do when he was dead' what he had not the power to do when he was alive. A man had to maintain his wife and family, but when he died, he could convey away everything from them, and leave them paupers on the State. If there were a law that each man's property should be divided when he died, the large estates would not long be much of an evil. Mr. Swanson said he would conclude by repeating what he had always said cn such occasions, namely, that he went to Wellington to vote according to his own judgment, and to exercise his own opinion. If at any time his constituents wished him to retire, it would not require even a majority of them to get him to do so.

Mr. Boardmas asked if Mr. Swanson would oppose the endowment of localities byland from the public estate. He pointed out the great advantages which the South had in many respects from the large endowments they had secured for various purposes. Mr. Swanson spoke at some length on this subject, stating that so far as he could, he would strive to have Auckland put on terms of equality. After referring to some other matters, he again thanked the electors, and moved a vote of .thanks to the Returning Officer. This was passed, and the proceedings terminated. CITY EAST. The nomination for this electoral district Look place at noon yesterday, in the Resident Magistrate's Court. There w.-s a crowded meeting of electors, and the greatest interest was manifest 3d in the proceedings. Mr. Thomas Cotter, the Returning Officer, was in attendance at the hour fixed for the nomination. Sir George Grey and Mr. J. M. Clark entered, each attended by a large number of friends and supporters. There was no demonstration of any kind. The proceedings, although occasionally somewhat noisy, were orderly throughout. The Returning Officer explained the circumstances under hich the election was to be held.

There was a long pause before there was any indication of a movement to propose the candidates. There was a good deal of " election field-marshalling," the well-known agents crossing over fiom side to side, and passing a moment in conference, then hastening back to their principals. There was, however, a tug-of-war expression about the silence which denoted, as well as any description, the probable severity of the contest about to take place. Mr. Edward Wrigiit Page was the first to break the temporary monotony by hastily mounting the steps to the Justicea' Bench, which served ior the hustings. He contented himself by nominating, in a rapid, emphatic manner, Sir George Grey as a fit and proper person to represent the City East in the General Assembly of New Zealand. (Cheers.)

Mr. Henry Keesino, Jon., came forward amidst applause to second the nomination. He said he saw some gentlemen rushing about in the hope of baulking Sir George Grey in what he might have to say, but there was no necessity for that, as Sir George's opinions were perfectly well-known. The only wonder to him was that such a person as himself should have been chosen to rccommend such a man as Sir G. Grey to the electors. When he (Mr. Keesmn) came to Auckland this city was the capital of New Zealand. But the New Zealand Company set up Wellington, and a species of disease then came upon the colony. Auckland settlers were self-supporting, a few plodding men, with no great ambition beyond obtaining daily bread. Although there was a good man for Governor, yet there was constant fear of the natives until Great Britain sent out Sir G. Grey. (Oh, and laughter.) Electors might laugh, but those who laughed so should know that Sir G. Grey was the stumbling block in the road of those who would grasp the country for themselves. (Loud cheers.) Mr. Keesing proceeded amidst a good deal of interruption, at length seconding the nomination.

Mr. Walter McCaulproposed Mr. James McCosh Clark. Mr. G. Fraser seconded. The Returning Owicer inquired whether there was any other candidate to be proposed, but there was no response. There was another pause for several minutes. The Returning Officer said the rule had been that the candidate first nominated first addressed the electors if he thought proper. But there was no law on the matter. He merely referred to what the practice had been. Sir George Grey : I believe the rule is, that when one of the candidates has before represented the district, or has formerly been nominated for it, he is regarded as the senior candidate. Mr. J. M. Clark: The invariable practice has been that the candidate who was first nominated first addressed the electors. Sir George Grey : Then, Mr. Returning Officer, as you say there is no rule in the matter—no law to direct you—l will ask you to use your discretion. The Returning Officer : 1 shall follow the practice hitherto, and will invite Sir George Grey to address the constituency, if he think proper to do so. Sir George Grby said that in regard to the pause which had taken place, he acted simply through courtesy to his opponent. He would at once state hiß reasons for coming before them on the present occasion. He sought the suffrages of City East because he thought he had some claims upon the electors for acts done and tervices performed. (Hear, hear). There was no other candidate thought of at that time. Moreover, the present was an important period in the history of the colony. The fact irat that some per*

sons had obtained upwards of eleven million acres of the best land of the colony. This was a circumstance which, unless it were prevented, would have the worst poss.b e effect upon the future of the colony, lhis was a young nation, in its cradle, in its infancy/and if the attempt upon the public lands were successful, it would be equivalent to the murder of an infant uation. It was not onlv this country that would be destroyed, but other yonng countries would meet a similar fate. If the crime that has been attempted in this country should succeed, future generations would be steeped in misery, 'the holders of these great properties would go abroad to spend the money derived from these lands, the suffering would become more intense every year and every generation. He believed tiiat his opponent in his old ace, which it was to be hoped lie would happily attain, would regret any part in the crime that was being perpetrated in these days. To prevent, if possible the robbery that W.is being pe: pet-ated, he would oppose the perpetrators o. it to the iast The rights of this place had been dispose.! of in the South. [Sir George Grey proceeded to answer criticisms and accusations made against his public conduct.] Expenditure was not, necessarily, extravagance. (A cry: Native expenditure.) Native expenditure was less tlun than now. He did not borrow money until the moment it was wanted. He did not borrow money to place it in some favourite bank, paying more interest to keep it there than they paid to net it. As to the Law Practitioners Act, it was done for the public welfare. The history of President Gartield, President Lincoln, and General Grant, were proofs of the wisdom of what he (Sir George Grey) proposed. The English papers said so. As long as lie lived lie °would oppose those who grasped the lands of the colony. As to the Patetere block. Mr. Rolleston, a member of the Government Mr. Clark was going to support, had stated that what he (Sir George Grey) said about the Government giving information to private persons was untrue. He (Sir George) maintaiaed that information was given°to certain lawyers who were interested on behalf of those private persons. hy was ho to be punished bceause he did his duty to the country by those whose hostility lie had aroused in doing so? He would continue to do his duty to the people of this country notwithstanding any opposition that might be brought against him. He would leave the result of the election in the electors hands. (Cheers.)

Mr. J. M. Claick said that as to the pause which took place liis motive was one of courtesy, because he thought it would be presumptuous to insist upon precedence in comparison with Sir George Grey, considering his standing and previous position in the colony. He might explain to the electors why he was somewhat late in the field. lie hadfirst considered that he had a fair share of public duty to perform, and he believed lie was doing that duty fairly. But he was irritated when he found that John King, J. M. Shera, and the remainder of the Central Committee wore again attempting to dictate to the electors of City Kast. (Cries of " Speight.") They were like chess-players: having removed the pawn they put forward their '' knight ' into position. (Cheers and laughter.) There wa3 another reason which actuated him in coming forward on the present occasion. It was mainly this—that a time of commercial prosperity was approaching ; public companies were being organised, which required some help, and would give a great deal of additional employment, and to this he (Mr. Clark) might also give some aid. In all matters of importance, he would be prepared to show that Sir George Grey was, as a politician, a gigantic failure, lie (Mr. Clark) would first speak of edr ■ atic-ii. He was an advocate for free, Com-,';.lsory, and secular education. lie would oppose the payment of fees, should it be proposed. As to triennial Parliaments, he believed that in the shifting character of New Zealand politics live years' term was too long, and many members uttered Hezekiah's prayer in view of dissolution, "Oh, Lord, not in our time." (Cheers and laughter). As to the Representation Act, it operated as an injustice to the North Island. He believed that the natives should have been counted in the population. Although an importer he (Mr. Clark) announced himself is a. protectionist. He thought that a moderate protection would develop local industry, and give a stimulus to the home markets, that increased employment would consequently he available, and prosperity for the working classes would follow it. What he objected to in Sir George Grey's conduct was that he had not fulfilled the objects which he had set before himself in his public utterances. He was sold by his allies in Parliament, and on the direct steam service, which he supported to a certain point, he was sold by his friends there. If Sir George Grey had fulfilled what ■ome of his early speeches implied, instead of opposing him 011 the present occasion, he might have now been a supportei. As to the native lauds, he was no more a supporter of free trade in native land than Sir George Grey. He believed that free trade in native land would lead to monopoly. There was however another view of the matter. Having allowed the natives to sell their lands, having given them the "right " there would be an injustice in taking it from them. At the same time it was notquite politic to have a Government competing with the private purchaser. Nor was it quite proper that a Government should have the lands in their own hands to dispose of, for Governments were not uniformly impartial in their modes of distribution of the public resources. The late Native Minister had laid down a plan when he presented himself to the public on that question of which he (Mr. Clark) would have been able to approve. Had that plan been adopted he (Mr. Clark) might not to-day be opposing Sir George Grey. Then as to the large estates held by some persons. This subject appeared to be Sir George Grey's trump card. It was no doubt a serious thing for the localities in which such large estates were held. But how were they obtained ? They were obtained under regulations which Sir George Grey had framed. Even the regulations of the Canterbury Association were more favourable to moderate estates than those of Sir George Grey. They at least kept the price of lauds to £2 an acre, and good land was gold outside under Sir George Grey's regulations at 103 an acre. But much of the land was bought under regulations properly framed, according to law at the time, and that being the ease, the purchasers had as much right to their lands as any mau had a right to anything which he purchased. Many of these purchasers had to ask the assistance of the banks to prevent the foreign speculator coming into the market and buying up the whole lot. Many of them were even ruined by overdrafts. It was a struggle on their part to keep their small estates. They had a fear that they would be ousted from their properties. There was a case mentioned by Sir George Grey at the Choral-hall, where an occupier's homestead was challenged, and that man had been driven from his homestead. It was the case of a man coveting his neighbour's vineyard, and if the person was shot at, that was a process which, Sir, G. Grey, or at-all events some of his friends, would approve. (Uproar and interruption). Sir George Gret : I must claim your protection from the insult that has been offered to me. I would not approve of anything of the kind, and I have no friends who would do ao. (Loud cheers). The Returning Officeh : lam sure Mr. Clark will withdraw any words that might be construed into an insult.

Mr. Clark : Well, I do not believe Sir &. Grey would approve of anything of the kind, but I said at all events some persons who are called his friends —or who call themselves his friends. (Uproar and noise.) Sir George Grey : I must again claim your protection. No persons that can be called friends of mine would approve of anything of the kind. The Returning Officer : As I understand it, Mr. Clark disclaims any imputation of the kind against Sir George Grey, and he will withdraw the statement that any of ftir Geori/e Grey's friends would approve of anything of the kind. (Hear,' hear.) Mr. Clark : Well, persons who called themselves his frii-.nds. It was unnecessary to pursue that matter any further. He was showing that Sir George Grey's administration had been a failure. Sir George Greys expenditure was not an expenditure on public works, it was ail expenditure in departments. The expenditure of tne Nati.'e Department had been notoriously extravagant. Sir George Grey had made one of his strong points against the extravag nice of Ministers in their travelling expenditure in Government steamers. Sir George Grey himselr, when he was a Minister, used the Hinemoa for his own travelling use quite as much as those he censured. ■ They knew what a failure .Sir George Grey's financial arrangements had been. It was said to be doubtful whether he knew anything about the accounts. So far as administration went, Sir George Grey had failed signally. He was not a match in any way for the men of the .South, for while he was always talking about '' Posterity in the future, and the human race," they were intent upon the necessities ol the present generation, and looked sharp after the signing of contracts. (Cheers and interruption.) Sir George Grey once refused to go and see a Ministry. He would have nothing to do with them ; they were not at all equal to him in position or intellect, and so he would not see them. He was rather surprised that a man of Sir George Grey's eminence would take such a position. 15ut conduct of that kind was not calculated to do those whom he represented much good, anil positive injury was likely to follow such a manifestation of pride as that. (Cheers and interrup- ' tion.) lie could not help going back and asking under what circumstances the seat of Government was taken away from Auckland, and what Sir George had done to help Auckland in that matter ? (Cheers and interruption.) He disclaimed any wish to be discourteous to Sir George Grey or his friends, but lie thought the time was come when the failure of Sir George Grey should be recognised, and that the people should give their verdict upon that question. (Cheers.) The Returning Officer then took the show of hands, admonishing those who were not electors not to hold up their hands. After counting the hands, he announced the result, as follows :—J. M. Clark, 2.3 ; Sir George Grey, 1!). This declaration was received with loud cheers. Mr. Henry Reusing and Mr. Okkf.r demanded a poll on behalf of Sir George Grey. On the motion of Mr. .1. M. Clark, a vote of thanks was passed to the Returning OtTicer. CITV NORTH. The nomination for City North took place yesterday at noon, at the Temperance-hall. About 100 electors were present. Mr. R. C. Rawlinson was Returning Otiicer. Mr. \V. J. Johnson propesed William George Garrard as a (it ami proper person to represent Auckland City in the General Assembly. Mr. Okorgi: Akeks seconded the nomination. Mr. Rop.ekt Hartley proposed Thomas Peacock as a candidate. Mr. D. C. McDol'gall seconded the nomination.

Mr. He>ry Rafton proposed Thomas Thwaites as a candidate. Me said working men should endeavour to be represented by working men. Mr. Michael Cock seconded the nomination. Mr. D. DrNNiNiuiAM proposed William Lee Rees as'a candidate. Mr. Rees would give Sir George Grey a hearty support. Mr. A. M. Williams seconded the nomination.

Mr. Garrauu said lie would say 3 few words before proceeding with liis rl: ;ory. The aristocracy were taking the skins oil' their hides :it Wellington, and making hogskin saddles of them, as they had done before. (Laughter.) lie had fought and bled for the country, and should hold a higher stake in life than some of the polished fops he had seen before him. What about Mr. Kees and the i'.SlX)'! That, with the £200 a year, was a nice picking, lie intended to go to the poll with a stout heart, for every man should stand 011 his own bottom. (Lr.ughter.) Mr. Kees could spout for liftecn hours. (Laughter.) Well, that was a long spell; but he could ypout for sixteen. (Hoars of laughter.) But he would not do it. Mr. L'eac iciv said he would speak briefly, as 110 had addressed them 011 the previous evening lengthily. He did not believe in patronising working men, or treating them us children, but aa men possessed of as much common sense as any other class in the community. He claimed to be a working man himself, and had many friends among working men. As for the distinction between a working man and a gentleman he did not understand what was meant by it. livery working man who did his duty, acted uprightly, honestly, and unselfishly in his relations with hisfellows,and main ained his selfrespect, was a true gentleman though he wore moleskins or had horny hands. (Cheers.) He would go to Wellington prepared to act rather than talk, and to carry out the work for which the electors sent him there. (Cheers.) Mr. Tii\t.uti;s thanked the working men for placing him in his present position. It remained for them to say at the poll whether capital or men should rule. Ho would go to the poll, if he was placed at the bottom of it. (Cheers.) Mr. Eke.s got up to address the electors, when

As Kll'Xtor desired to know whether he was on any electoral roll ? The Rt.Tcr.M.vc Officer said he had received a document, under the hand of the Returning Ollieer of the district of Waiteinata, notifying that Mr. Rees was on the Waitcmata electoral roll. Jlr. Keks stated he trusted they would return him—indeed lie was certain they would. (Laughter.) lie was not opposed to two of the candidates, but to Air. Peacock solely, as the principles of the party he was associated with were diametrically opposed to his own. It was asked what he had done for Auckland. He had got £50,000 voted for roads and bridges absolutely by his own exertions,and had never even received thanks for it. He placed the motion on the paper, and ascertained he could carry it. The Grey Government asked him to withdraw the motion and they would place the sum 011 the supplementary estimates. He found that was not done, and went to Mr. Sheehan, who referred him to Sir George Grey. Instead he wrote out his resignation, and placed it in the hands of the Speaker. The sum was put on the estimates, the vote carried, and the Speaker tore up his resignation. (Cheers.) For the truth of that he referred them to Sir William Fitzherbert, Sir George Grey, and Mr. Sheehan. As to the £300 paid to him, it was a perfectly just payment for services rendered, which were of an onerous character in looking up the case of the natirea

in the West Coast affair. He would take | •ccasion to explain matters about the work- J ing of the East Coast Land Company, and his connection with it, at his meeting in the Theatre Royal. In contesting City North he obeyed the wishes of liis party, but would have preferred to fight Mr. Swanson ill Newton. He would go to Waitemata too, and face the gentleman who painted pigs and betrayed his country. (Laughter.) Mr. Charles Hill asked if it was not a fact Mr. Rees had been obliged to withdraw from the East Coast Land Company, ill order to its being successfully floated ? Mr. Rees said he had not withdrawn, was a large shareholder, and its solicitor at the present time. The Returning Officer called for a show of hands with the following result Garrard, 'J; Peacock, 15; Thwaites, 4; Rpes, 40. A poll was demanded, which, it was announced, would take place on Friday, the 9th instant.

CITY WEST. The nomination of candidates for the representation of Auckland City \Ve3t electorate took place at noon yesterday at St. 'James'-hall. Wellington-street. There was ] a moderately good attendance. Exactly at noon the Returning Officer (Mr. Edward S. Willeocks) opened the proceedings. Mr. Nicholas Sims then proposed Dr. dames Wallis. j Mr. .Toun Walker seconded the nomination. Mr. Edward .Tames Carp, proposed Mr. J. M. Dargaville, ftnd said Mr. E. Carr would have done so but that lie was confined to bed sick. Mr. Ciiari.es Samuel "Wright seconded the nomination. Mr. Chaiu.es Barrett Kino proposed Mr. William Laing. Mr. Neh. MeC it l.s K v's econ ded the nomination. Mr. Henry James Smith proposed Mr. Alexander Fleming, and drew attention to his services and public career as a member of the City Council for the district for the last six years, as an evidence of his fitiies3 to be their representative. Mr. Geo. Rattimy Macnati seconded the nomination. Dr. Wallis then addressed the electors. He would briefly state the positive and negative reasons why he should not be superseded. The positive reasons were, Ist, that he had been faithful to his party during the six years he represented them ; 2nd, that he had in every instance kept his promises and pledges ; 3rd, that during all these years he had given his whole time to public business ; 4th, that he represented no clique, faction, or party ; sth, that through the kindness of the electors, he had received an excellent political education. The negative reasons were—lst, that he had no axe to grind ; '2nd, that he had never tried to raise himself into a political position by preying on the religious animosities of the community ; 3rd, that he was no landshark ; and 4th, that he opposed the kauri gum tax; and he hoped for these positive and negative reasons, they wonld give him their votes on Friday week. Mr. Daroavii.lb said he had not intended to have given any address to-day, but Dr. Walli3 had challenged him to it by his reference to the Superintendency election and to the tax on kauri gum. He fought the light for the Superintendency, and it was a good fight against strong opposition, and instead of being ashamed of it, he was proud of it. lie considered they required fresh blood, and was glad to welcome Mr. Fleming and Mr. Laing as candidates. He would have been ashamed to come before them, and say lie had been their representative for five years, and not be able to point to something he had done. (Cheers.) He alluded to the shameful manner in which Auckland had been treated in the matter of public works. He was opposed to the property tax, and in favour of a land tax. Mr. Peacock had told the electors of City North that only 22,000 out of a population of 450.000 paid this tax, but statements such as that were very misleading. It was the heads of families who paid the tax, and these represented families averaging from five to eight. He refuted Mr. Monk's statement, that only the wealthy paid the tax, that the Bank of New Zealand paid £50 every morning before breakfast. It was the depositors who paid it. He then pointed out how the property tax aft'ectcd local industries, and replied to the remarks made by Dr. Wallis.

Mr. Lain"<"; ridiculed Dr. Wallis's pretensions to being returned unopposed, and concluded a forcible speech by saying it was now for the electors to decide whether they should be represented by a capitalist, a parson, or one of themselves, whether they should have a labour representative or a capital representative. Mr. Flkminc said that having addressed them on the previous night, it was not now necessary to detain them. He referred to some leading questions, aud announced himself as a Liberal. A show of hands was then taken, which resulted as follows:—Dr. James Wall is, ,3 ; Mr. J. M. Dargaville, 12; Mr. William Laing, 11 ; Mr. A. Fleming, 12. The Retl'kxini; Officer declared the show of hands in favour of Mr. Fleming. Dr. Wai.li.s demanded a poll. Mr. Dakcaviu.h moved a vote of thanks to the Returning OUicer, which was unanimously carried. I£DEN. The nomination for this district took place in the Excelsior-hall, Pitt and East streets, Mr. S. Y. Collins, Returning Oflicer. Mr. 10. Bouciikr proposed Mr. J. A. Tole, but subsequently withdrew the proposal. Mr. F. Cherry proposed Mr. Reader Gilson Wood, one who had for many years served the country faithfully and well. He was one favourable for the economical administration of the Government. Mr. SEAl'.r.ooK seconded the proposal. As to the Licensing Hill, Mr. Wood voted for it, while Mr. Tole opposed it, notwithstanding what he said at last night's meeting. He then read the names of thoso who voted for and against it in the last session of Parliament. Mr. J. Warren proposed Mr. J. A. Tole. He was a tried friend, and faithful to his pledges, and always attended to the wishes of his constituents. On more than one occasion he had voted against his own convictions to give effect to the wishes of his constituents. Mr. Thompson seconded the nomination. Mr. R. G. Wood said there was one subject upon which there seemed to be some misapprehension. Mr. Tole was understood to have stated that Dr. Menzies, 111 the Legislative Council, had sent a Bill to the House of Representatives in favour of reading the Bible iu schools. He had no recollection of snch a Bill having been sent down by Dr. Menzies, aud read from Hansard to show that in November, 1579, Dr. Menzies moved in the Legislative Council that provisions be made for the reading of the Bible in public schools with a conscience clause. The motion was lost in the Council. 111 July, 18S0, Dr. Menzies moved again in the Legislative Council to the same effect, but on that occasion the previous question was moved, aud the motion was never even put in the Upper House, so that the proposal was even rejected by the Council itself, and never came before the House of Representatives. Mr. Tolf. denied having voted against the third reading of the Licensing Bill. He

gave his vote on that occasion on the question of local self-government, but before doing so he consulted the Speaker to see if doing so, as he intended, would at all imperil the Bill. He was informed it would not do so, and was told how the Government could act in such a case. He had, since his return from Wellington, obtained their Speaker's opinion upon that vote, which agreed with the opinion he gave at Wellington. The Bill was a fair one, and placed the power in the hands of the local people, and should be fairly administered. Much had been made of the Land League business, and he wished to dispose of it at once. He did not sympathise with it, and did not sympathise with violence of any kind. Ho was opposed to all individuals and associations who offended against the law. As he understood it, the Land League was not Fenianism or Communism, or committed outrages at all. It was an association whose action was to obtain a fair principle of landholding. He was ill favour of that principle, but was opposed to all expressions of sympathy with outrages that were uttered. He had no sympathy with violence in any form, but recognised the right of the communities in the old world to strive by lawful means to obtain a better system of land holding. After recounting how he had diligently attended to his duties while others had left their posts, and designating Mr. Wood as a political vagrant, his friends at Waitemata having turned him out, he asked them not to support the man who was the head and front of political treachery. After assuring the meeting of his intention to be faithful to his promises, and to carry out the wishes of the people, he hoped they would make a choice of which they would not be ashamed.

On a show of hands being called for, 4 were held up for Mr. Wood, and 24 for Mr. Tole. Mr. Wood demanded a poll. The Returning Officer said the poll would take place on the 9th inst., and the polling-places would be the Excelsior-hall, Eden-hall, Mr. R. S. Allen's store, and the Public-hall, Mount Albert. On the motion of Mr. Tolf, seconded by Mr. Wood, a vote of thanks was passed to the Returning Officer, and the meeting separated.

PARNELL. Tlie nomination for Parnell took place yesterday, at the Parnell-hall. After reading the writ, the Returning Officer, Mr. Lodge, invited the nomination of candidates. Captain D. H. McKenzie said he had much pleasure in proposing Mr. Frederick Joseph Moss as a tit and proper person to represent the Parnell electorate in Parliament. Mr. James Whig lev seconded the nomination of Mr. Moss. Mr. James Watt proposed Mr. Richard Monk. Mr. John' McColl seconded the nomination of Mr. Monk. Mr. Mos.s then addressed the electors. He reviewed his political career, and stated his reason for supporting Sir G. Grey. He indicated the direction in which the legislation of next session should be, namely, lands, judicial reform, Native Lands Court, the reform of the Legislative Council, &c. He thought the House of Representatives should be reduced from 95 to 45 members, and the number of members of the Ministry should be reduced. The question of loeal selfgovernment should be dealt with. Ho was sincerely thankful that the present contest was going on. At the last election it had been his misfortune to be returned unopposed. He would, if elected, go to Parliament as a Liberal of the broadest character. He would, if returned, do his best, and to the utmost of his power endeavour faithfully to represent the electors of Parnell. Mr. Mosi", in the course of a short speech, said if he came before the electors as an untried politician, he had been known to them for many years. The liberal measures lie claimed to be those he had always approved. He felt that good legislation should be for the benefit of the struggling class—the rich could take care of themselves. He would go to Wellington for no party purpose, or to grind any particular axe, but to be helpful to a policy which would give them exactly the loeal government which would be good for the country. He would address the electors at public meetings, and would then take up the points which Mr. Moss had raised. In reply to a question, Mr. Monk, said he would do his best to sccure the restoration of the boundary between Parnell and the city. The Returning Officer declared the show of hands to be :—Mr. Monk, 13; Mr. Moss, 24. Messrs. Watt and McColl demanded a poll on behalf of Mr. Monk. A vote of thanks was accorded to the Returning Officer.

WAITEMATA. The nomination for the electoral district of Waitemata took place at the Devonporthall, at noon, yesterday. About sixty persons were present. Mr. Thomas Seaman presided as Returning Oflicer. Mr. Alexander Wilson" briefly proposed, and Mr. Thomas Foroham seconded Mr. XV. J. Hurst. Mr. R. M. Stauk proposed, and Mr. Henry Pitts seconded Mr. Ewen Alison. Mr. Hurst on stepping on the platform, was received with applause. He said he had been connected with politics since 1567; yet the attacks made on him had been of a private character, not on his public acts. 110 referred to his connection with the Education Act, which he and Mr. Gillies, when Superintendent, had suffered great obloquy for introducing, but had since been accepted by the colony as a great boon. He thought the outdistricts of the electorate had been much neglected. (Applause.) He could point to a number of works with which his name would be associated, especially the main outlet from the district. He succeeded in obtaining a recreation ground of 17 acres. He thought it a disgrace that not more than seven miles of the Great North-road had befn macadamised. The roads in the South were all well formed, through the South having an undue share of public expenditure. His private character had been deliberately traduced, and that only yesterday. He hoped yet to be able to take legal steps against his traducers. As regards local government he had found Mr. Hall quite willing to forward decentralisation from Wellington. He had aided the Government in obtaining their position, and as long as they continued to act as they had in the past he would loyally support them. The iinance of the previous Government had been a muddle, the present Government had loyally retrenched. Sir George Grey had skulked out of the House instead of voting for the leaseholder's' qualification. Mr. Hurst spoke for nearly an hour. In reply to a question Mr. Horst said that in IS7B he was not considered Grey enough for Waitemata. (Great applause. —Too true !) He promised to support the Grey Government; but country was beyond all party. He was ashamed of the so-called Liberal party. He would exert his influence to have the railway extended from Waikato to Taranaki. He was not sufficiently conversant with the matter of the northern railway, but he would undeavour to get a fair share of expenditure for the North. He would insist upon the Government supporting main roads in the Horth as they do now in the South.

Mr. Alison", who was greeted with applause, spoke briafly. He said he was actuated by the laudable ambition of holding a seat iu the Legislature of the country in which he was bom. He would never hesitate to raise liia voice for any requirement. Mr. Hurst had not answered the question whether he had promised to support Sir G. Grey candidly or manfully. Mr. Hurst was not entitled to take credit for any of the works which he had referred to in his speech. The Counties Act would work better if it were established on a more satisfactory basis. He agreed with Mr. Sneehan's views on the native question, and thought it should be removed from the sphere of party politics. In reply to a question as to whether he would support or oppose the present Ministry, Mr. Alison said he would support the party which he thought would be most beneficial to the country. He would not bind himself to any party, but exercise an intelligent vote. [Mr. Lamb characterised this answer as a shuffle.] He thought ' the Hall Ministry had done a great deal for the colouy. Tiie show of hands was taken, and resulted as follows For Mr. Hurst, 29 ; for Mr. Alison, 25. I Mr. Alisox demanded a poll. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, proposed by Mr. Hurst, seconded by Mr. Alison, terminated the proceedings. MANUKAU. The nomination took place at the R. M Court, Ouehunga. Mr. \V. G. P. O'Callaghan, Returning Officer, presided. Mr. J. B. Jackson proposed Sir M. O'Rorke, and Mr. Codlin, Mayor-elect, seconded. Mr. 0. C. McGee was proposed by Mr. H. Robinson, and seconded by Mr. John Dore. Sir M. O'Rorke addressed the electors in a few words. Mr. McGee also spoke. A show of hands was taken, and resulted :—Sir M. O'Rorke, 36 ; Mr. O. C. McGee, 6. A poll was demanded by Mr. McGee. A vote of thanks was accorded to the Returning Officer. FRANKLIN NORTH. The nominations for the electoral district of Frauklin North took place in the Publiehall, Otahuhu. Mr. Shanaghan was the Returning Officer. Mr. W. F. Bucklaud was proposed by Mr. H. S. Andrews, and seconded by Mr. Caleb Wallis. Mr. Samuel Luke was proposed by Mr. William Goodfellow, J.P., anil seconded by Mr. John McAnulty. Major Harris was proposed by Mr. S. Cossey, and seconded by Mr. li. S. Reid. Mr. Gordon was proposed by Mr. William Absolum, and seconded by Mr. H. Scurrah. FRANKLIN SOUTH. The nomination took place to-day at noon, in the schoolhouse, Pukekohe. Mr. Thomas Jackson was Returning Officer. After the writ and advertisement were read, he called upon duly qualified electors to propose suitable candidates. Mr. Wric.iit proposed Captain E. Hamlin as a suitable candidate. Mr. J. Kelcher seconded the nomination. Mr. Gunsox proposed Mr. F. Lawry as a suitable representative. Mr. Heard seconded the proposal. No other candidates having been proposed, a show of hands was called for, with the following result: —Lawry, 25 ; Hamlin, '23. The show being in favour of Mr. Lawry, a poll I was demanded on behalf of Captain Hamlin by Messrs. Wright and Kelcher, the proposer and seconder. A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer brought the proceedings to a close. WAIPA. Hamilton, Thursday. Messrs. Jackson, Whitaker, McMinn, and Johns were nominated to day for Waipa. After the nomination Mr. McMinn formally withdrew, stating that his candidature only would assist in helping to return the man who was not a settler in the district, referring to Mr. Whitaker. The show of lianas was in favour of Mr. Whitaker. A poll was demanded by Major Jackson and Mr. Johns. Show of hands :—Whitaker, 22 ; Johns, 7 ; Jackson, G; McMinn, 2 (withdrawn). WAIKATO. Cambridge, Thursday. Mr. Wliyte was returned unopposed for Waikato. BAY OF ISLANDS. Rcssei.l, Thursday. The nomination took place to-day, and the show of hands was iu favour of Hobbs, 17, to Luudon's 3. Mr. Hobbs addressed the electors, refuting statements made by Mr. Lundon on the previous night. [BY TELEC.RAI'II.J At the nomination for Napier to - day, the following were proposed :—Mr. John Buchanan, Mr. Justin McSweeney, Mr. John McDougad. The show of hands was in favour of Mr. Buchanan, The nomination of candidates for Taranaki were Mr. Joseph Colesbv and Colonel Trimble. The show of hands was equal. Poll demanded. Nominations for the liutt took place today. Messrs. Thomas Mason, Henry Jackson, M. L. Marks, and Duncan Sinclair were proposed. The show of liauds was iu favour of Mr. Mason.

At the nomination for Wanganui Mr. John Ballance anil Mr. W. 11. Watt were nominated. The show of hands was : Ballance, SG ; Watt, -15. Mr. Watt's candidature -was decided upon in the last hours. Mr. W. 11. Levin and Thomas Dwau were nominated for Thordon to-day. The nomination for Wairau to-day were H. Dodson and A. P. Seymour. The show of hands was in favour of .Mr. Dodson. For the Rangitikei seat to-day Sir XV. Fox and Mr. John Stevens were nominated. The show of hands was in favour of Mr. Stevens. A poll was demanded on behalf of Sir XV. Fox. For Dunedin Messrs. W. Frascr and l'yke were nominated. At the show of hands Mr. Pyke had 15 and Mr. Fraser 9. For Port Chalmers, Mr. Macaudrew. being the ouly candidate, was declared elected. For Dunedin South, Mr. Henry Smith Fish, Mr. Archibald Ailsou, 'and Mr. Ross, the late Mayor, were proposed. The show of hands was in favour of Mr. Fish. For Dunedin West, Mr. Thomas Dick, Mr. William Downie Stewart, and Mr. William .Jackson Barry were proposed. The show of hands was in favour of Mr. Dick. For Dunedin Central, Mr. Bracken, Mr. Dickson, and Mr. Cargill were nominated. For Dunedin East, Mr. C. S. Reeves, Mr. M. N. Green, and Mr. J. F. Davis were nomimated. The show of hands was in favour of Mr. Davis. Mr. C. A. DeLautour and Mr. J. S. MacKenzie were the only two candidates nominated for Mount Ida. The show of hands was in favour of Mr. MacKenzie. Mr. .T. F. Thomson, Captain T. XV. McKenzie, and Mr. George F. Richardson, were nominated for Mataura. The show of hands gave Mr. Thomson, 3 ; McKenzie, 2; and Richardson, 5. Messrs. H. Feldwick, and J. Hatch, were nominated for luvercargill. The show of hands was in favour of the former. At Taieri Mr. James Fulton was elected to represent the Taieri without opposition. At Waikouaiti Mr. James Green and Mr. Mr. A. C. Thompson were nominated. The show of hands resulted in favour of Mr. Thompson.

At Wakatipu Messrs. A. Fergus, A. Mc- | Bride, and A. C. Thompson were nominated. The show of hands resulted :—Fergus, 24; Mcßride, 15 ; Thompson, 14. At Bruce Messrs. \V. A. Murray, James Adam, and James Rutherford, were nominated. The show of hands was :—Adam, 32 ; Rutherford, 3S, Murray 15. Messrs. W. S. Sutter, Thomas Fisher, W. J. Ne\rton, and David Anderson, were to-day nominated for Gladstone. The show of hands was in favour of the former. Mr. Montgomery was the sole candidate for Akaroa, and was duly elected. Messrs. Saunders, Fendall, and Mcllraith were duly proposed for Cheviot. The Returning Officer proceeded to take a show of hands, when Mr. Saunders claimed the right to speak. Messrs. Fendall and Mcllraith wished to have the show of hands taken. The Returning Officer left it to the meeting which decided by a considerable majority to take the show first. Mr. Saunders again protested against the illegal act, but°the show was duly called for, and resulted as follows Saunders, 2; Fendall, 25; Mcllraith, 10. Mr. Saunders' supporters refused to vote. Air. Saunder? said he would address them at Amberley next Tuesday on the illegality of the nominatioc.

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Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS., New Zealand Herald, Volume XVIII, Issue 6254, 2 December 1881

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7,496

THE ELECTIONS. New Zealand Herald, Volume XVIII, Issue 6254, 2 December 1881

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