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THE GLENROWAN AFFAIR.

NED KELLY. When it had been determined that. the examination of Kelly should take place at Beechworth, Mr. Call, P.M., visited the gaol. Kelly was brought before him, and he was asked if he had any objection to being removed to Beeohworth for trial. He replied he had none. Constable M'lntyre was present, and formally declared that the prisoner was the person who shot Constables Scanlan and Loaegan, in the now celebrated murderous outrage ia the Wombat ranges, in the mouth of October, 1878. Kelly's demeanor was simply respectful. Mr. Castieau, expeotiap; that Kelly would be sent for at an early hour, had everything prepared to facilitate his immediate departure. About half-past,eight o'oloek, the streets beiog deserted, a waggonette drove up to tho gaol main entrance. It contained Sergeant Steele and four of the mounted constabulary fully armed. Sergeant Steele presented the necessary order for the delivery of the body of .Ned Kelly, and this was of course immediately met, Kelly being sent for by two warders. Oh emerging from hia oell, it was seen that he was dressed cleanly and respectably. He wore a pilot cloth cost, checked waiatcoat and corduroy trousers. He appeared in excellent health, and all that indicated that he had been wounded, was his lameness in the left leg. He was at once handcuffed, and unassisted hobbled to th 3 waggonette. He took hi« seat between, two constables, Mr, Castieu, who accompanied the prisoner to the waggonette, said to him, "jNow, Kelly, it is your game to be quiet; do not do anything foolieh." Hβ replied, "D— it, ain't I always quiet?" The vehicle was then driven away. On arriving at the Newmarket station, Kelly alighted, and it was found that in order to reach the train it would be necessary for him to walk acrcm the line. This he refused to do, stating that the Government were rioh enough to pay for a conveyance for him. The police attempted to persuade him to go quietly, but he declined to move, and was most insolent in his demeanor, the language he used besides being disgusting,,

THE MURDERED MA.N SHERRITT.

Mrs. Sherritt has sent in a claim for compensation to the Government. She does not namo any eum, but submits that sho is entitled to substantial compensation for the assistance her husband and she herself rendered to the police (for she had to cook all ifcheir meals), for the loss of her husband, and for the loea of her house, which, is rendered valuoloss, as no one will live in it. Kolly haa by somo means heard that she has made this'application, for in the train to-day ho inquired if her compensation would be paid oufc 61 the reward land- For some tiniie before bis death; Bherritt appeared to

fully realise that hia life was not worth much, and he sometime?, remarked to hie wife, that some day she would .hear of his being shot. On one occasion lie was ordered down: to > Ben alia for duty on a horsestealing case, and he told his wife when ho was preparing to leavo that sho wonld certainly not sea him again alive, that she would hear of him being shot by the gang and that all he desired was that she should come down to Benalta and bury hie remainsqnietly. Seeing that he was really afraid oC hia life, the officer m charge of the police at Benalla relieved him of his proposed new duty. Detective Ward and Sherritt indeed made thing 3 very warm for the gang in the Boechworth district, and the gang vowed vengeance against both. Ward was continually receiving letters from them in Joe Byrne's handwriting, threatening his life. On one occasion he was informed in this way that if they could lay hands on him they would place him in a hollow log and roast him alive. Another letter contained a large picture of a coffin, and a third a piece of crape. Ward, however, pursued the tenor of his way undaunted.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18800817.2.36

Bibliographic details

THE GLENROWAN AFFAIR., New Zealand Herald, Volume XVII, Issue 5850, 17 August 1880

Word Count
673

THE GLENROWAN AFFAIR. New Zealand Herald, Volume XVII, Issue 5850, 17 August 1880

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