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SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME.

gJBI ' c, ' >i sby the l ast m ail is n °t o£ much HM[ cicl* 6 °* Th° onl .y * wo meetings of any SB' Birmingham and Croydon SB Spring MeetiDg. At Birmingham, MS jjp-t f f by Thomaatown, out of Arab 9b „ tlic Grand Annual Steeplechase. H .Vaii/ie has a rare jumping pedigree. 95 T*' J . , one ot the best little horses ever 8f Hi-- sirL v!j' t being a tremendously hard puller Wt fosi'"' " jjtßcalt horse to ride ; that brought SB fce «" a5 ; ,[ in the Grand National SteepleH !ii* to f Liverpool, in ISG2, when backed 9 fh,ise - i tremendous stake by the Irish IS to w. IQ a H ; s dam, Arab Maid, was also 9 *' vlS i hrated I risu Steeplechase mare It B » » t seen that Austerlitz, the future W f thu Liverpool Steeplechase, with B aa "° started at 15 to 1 against him, and M offn er up, The o(;hor raccs at B lrim ng. I D call for no comment, as only inferior I Urand Annual Steeplechase I £. 200 add ed : Mr. A. Crof- [ d Io! w' -tbdu'lUh, lOst (Mr. Bcasely), Ist; I Wn i f'ercival's Sparrow, aged, lOafc /lbs I Jlr, rV \ "nd- Mr. Housen's Lady Christina, < Grt = lost (Fox), 3rd; Craenin, lOst ; list Sibs; Austerlitz, lOst 10s fc Slbs, also ran. Betting : ito 5 against Ratcatcher ; 6 to 1 Sparrow ; 6 ; I Abdullah; 25t0 1, Austerlitz. Won steeplechase forai at Birmingham discounted at Croydon to a considerable **" ,t. The Grand Annual winner, Ab?;U" was never dangerous from start to -•'h ' aud his running was too bad to be \ustcrlitz again rau b;'.dly in the l rJ^ r , "steeplechase. Bridget won the n rife Kaec very easily and brought Scamp •tn a bound for the International to be run ■ 1F \tarfh The only drawback to th<s meet- ?, »"» the bad fall received by Mr. W. i Johnston, the celebrated gentleman rider • 'he hurdle race. The leviathan, laid J?/bi- bet of 5000 to 400 against .Pob jr. for the Derby during the meeting. LriniT Handicap Hurdle Eace, losuvs. "Zh °'200 added. Sir J. D. Astley's b m rriiteet by Hermit, out of Bertha, 4 years, il-r""lbs (Mr. Crawshaw), 1 ; Mr. Vane's Mclro'4 5 years, list 71bs (Marsh), 2 ; Mr Fitzroy's Birbcck, G years, 12st (Joues), »■ Halifax, llstlOlhs ; Semptress, IlstTlbs ; Marvellous, list 51bs ; Duplex, list olbs; Katina, llstSlbs ; Pluton, llstolbs ; Uegenerfteur list 51bs; Helsthorpe, list 31bs; Princess Boubou, lOst 121bs ; Bolus, lOdt Ccbonnaire, lOst 121bs, also rau. Betting : 4 to 1 against Bolus ; 0 to 1, Melrose ; 7 to 1, Debounaire ; S to 1, Bridget. Won easily by three lengths. Croydon I'irst Spring Steeplechase of "Osovs., £200 added : Mr. J. Winfield's b g Birdcateher, by Revolver, out of Lena Rivers, l"«t (Anthony) 1 ; Mr. Fitzroy's • Chilblain, list 121bs (Jones), 2; Mr. R a. Hobson's Austerlitz, llstolbs (owner), 3 ; Jlessager, list libs; Dewdrop list 41bs; Kopedancer, list 41bs; Azov, list 21bs ; Abdullah, list libs; Rufina, list, also ran. Betting: 3 to2>Messagcr; stol, Abdullah; 6 to 1, Chilblain ; 100 to 15, Sirdcatcher ; 33 to 1, Austerlitz. TiYon in gallant style by ten lengths ; Austerlitz trotted in third. It will be seen by the foregoing that horses run curiously at home as well as iii the colonies, and no notice is taken of it, as from the running of Austerlitz, few would ever have picked him as a Liverpool winner, except they had noticed the long prices laid against him, which showed he was not meant, and takeninto consideration his pedigree, beingby Kataplan, out of Lufra (Lowlander's dam). The betting on the Derby and Two Thousand is very limited : the following will be found correct. Two Thousand: 2to 1 ngainst Chamant; 100 to 15 against Lady Golightly; 10 to 1 agaiust Morier ; 20 to 1 against Thunderstone. Derby : sto 1 agaiust Ciiamant ; 1000 to 90 offered against Kob Roy ; 1000 to 70 offered against Morier. The chief topic in racing circles is Lord Falmouth's motion, to be brought on at the next general meeting of the Jockey Club, with regard to French horses running in England. As many of your readers may not know it, it is as follows :—Moved by Lord Falniouth ; seconded by Sir J. D. Astley : "That co produce stakes or weight for age race, to be entered for as foals, yearlings, or two-year-olds, shall be open to foreign bred horses, unless specially advertised to be so, or unless such horses were bred in countries which throw open their races on equal terms to British horses." "Bleys,"inhisnotesof February 24, says : " Correspondence upon. Lord Falmouth's motion has broken out afresh, and a letter from M. Lupin to Admiral Rous, with the replies thereto were published this week in the columns of the limes.- The of Ailesbury has also taken up his pen on the same subject at great length, and when the Jockey Club meets in the Craven week, the deliberations will be watched with keen interest on both sides of the channel. To extract the pith from M. Lupin's letter, he points out that whereas the starters foi the English Derby are made up by subscrip tions alono, there is a bonus of £2,00( attached to the corresponding race a Chantilly, and that at almost all our meeting; to which the French stables send com petitors, the Jockey Club do not give ; prize. This argument possesses no value and is swept away by the statistic: used in return. " Last year," writes tin gallant Admiral, "England gave £143,75: for races on the flat, and. that sum includec the Queen's Plates voted by the House o Commons for the sole improvement o native horses." Striking deeper into th<

[uestion, Admiral Rons naturally asks what be Frenchmen bad to fear? They have >ought our best stallions and mares with Teat judgment. < Their climate is more avourable to the growth of horses than ours, ,nd they do not even allow roarers to conanunate the breed as is too often the case a England. The views of Admiral ilous .re expressed with much happiness throughput, and he regrets the dispute more from he disturbance of the harmony that las so long prevailed, than with res>ecfc to tho balance of the money. The perpetual steward of the Jockey Club leither pledges himself to support or oppose jou\ FalmoutVs motion, but is clearly mxious that we should be met half way in he present agitation. France has in reality lothing to lose, as although tho establishment if a reciprocal treaty might }ead to some nVasions oE Chantilly, they would be few ind far between. The time to my thinking iae arrived for our neigubouru to make two >r three concessions, or they may be denied idmission to several o£ tho endowed weight-tor-age races in England. It would be a matter o£ serious regret if the season so soon to commence should witness a rupture not easily to be healed again, and under any circumstances a Joukey Club vote ie undesirable. Lord Falmouth hae, beyond all doubt, determined to press his motion, and even the Marquis of Ailesbury admits that perfect reciprocity would be desirable. Lord Hardwicke gives notice of a motion "That except hy special conditions, no horses bred in countriea where the racee are not opened on equal terms to British horsee shall run for any stakes in England where added money is given." This amendment requires much consideration, as the foreigner would still be at liberty to throw down the gauntlet in the Derby, Two Thousand,,, £nd Ledger, &c, while two or three special prizes might be provided ia the course of the year with sufficient added money to 3e4 off the Grand Prix, and- other free races oh the Continent.

The obituary of the present month is rather heavy, as besides the death of Mr. Merry and Mr. J. Vorral, two well-known names, appear, viz., Captain Little, familiarly known as " Josey .Little," and so well known as a gentleman rider. He died in Paris rather suddenly, from an attack of jaundice. He had hardly an equal amongst steeplechase riders during his cross country days, and his great hit was when he rode Chandler for the Grand National, in IS4B, beating Tom Oliver on The Curate. He began riding when he was in the Ist Dragoon Guards, and his earliest feat was when he finished second on Pickwick, in the Grand Military at Northampton, 18*5, and rode Captain Allen's Sir William whun he won a three miles steeplechase at Exeter. He was owner of Peter Simple, who, in Tom Oliver's hands, carried off the Grand National in 1853, beating Miss Mowbray and a fair field, and amongst flat racers that ran in his name were at one time General Hesse and Man-at-Arms.

In the obituary of racing men has to be recorded the name o£ Neptune Stagg, a once well-known jockey, who committed suicide at Edgbaston Lane, Moseley. In his day he was a jockey of some repute, and rode Lord Miltown'3 Cruiskeen,when she won the Uesanvitch, and Heaton Park, and Staffordshire Stakes, in 1839, and the Chester t-np, 1841. Stagg was latterly both a Dreeder and owner of racehorees, Miss Lissie

and Jester being the beat known of them. Mr. J. Snarry, whose na-no is almost as familiar to horee-racing in England as that of his old master, Sir Tatton Sykes, died last February, at the age of SI. His connection with the Sledmere Stud existed for more than 40 years, and continued for a short time after the death of the late owner. Snarry plays a prominent part in one of the pleasanteat of the many pleasant chapters written by "The Druid," and ho was always an object of interest to visitors of the sale paddocks at Donea3ter, as, with outstretched stick, he followed the movements of his youthful charges round tho ring. Ho was breeder and, during part of her career, owner of that good mare Lily Agnes. Mr. W. G. Grace intends retiring from the cricketing world and following his profession as a surgeon. At a meeting nreaided over by Lord Fitzharding, it was determined to present him with a testimonial. 120sovs. wore subscribed at the time towards it.

The Waterloo Cup was won by Mr. R. F. Willkina's ns (Mr. Giittus) f.w.b.p. Coomasio,'beating Mr, J. Briggs's blk b p Braw Lass, by Blackburn, out of Happy Lass. Little C'oomassie is one of the wonders of the age. Coomassic by Celebrated (by Albatross) out of Queen, only weighs 431bs. f and was purchased by Mr. Gittus for £60, at Beckuampton, and afterwards purchased by Mr. C. Toulinin, jun., for £250 and con tingeuci«s. The following is the description of the deciding course: " Cootnassie and Braw Lass, amidst breathless excitement,' were let go over some beautiful grass stretches, and a good hare being put up, a fine race was uin between the pair for some considerable distance, wheu the littlo fawn drew clear about a couple of lengths, and sweeping away on the lino took tirst turn. Tho hare then shot to Mr. Briggs's bitch, who, persevering, sueceded in making several strong wrenches, making matters serious for a time. The little south country bitch then dashed away again, took her place, wrenched strongly, and made a magnificent kill, and placed to the credit of her friends the Waterloo Cup of 1877." Leon, the celebrated Mexican rider, did not succeed in his feat of riding 600 miles in 50 hours at the Agricultural Hall, Islington, owing to his horses failing him. Ho only accomplished 505 miles in 49 hours 5 minutes 30 seconds. Leon is 25 years old, and has held tho rank of lieuteuaut in the Mexican army under Juarez, who employed his services as guide.

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Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME., New Zealand Herald, Volume XIV, Issue 4820, 28 April 1877, Supplement

Word Count
1,953

SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME. New Zealand Herald, Volume XIV, Issue 4820, 28 April 1877, Supplement

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