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SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME.

BY TIPSTER. --;..-: s ; (Written for the Weekly News.] , . London, December 2. Agreeably to your request, I shall throughout next year forward yon a montldyletter containing a resume of English racing news. I propose to confine myseif strictly to relating the history of, and remarking upon, the great .events only, avoiding unnecessary Retail a3 likely to be wearisome to colonial readers. . .;

I amfortunate in numbering amon»st my acquaintance several members of the chief .turf clubs, and this fact will enable me to give yon a good deal of amusing gossip and scandal which does not appear in the ordinary sporting Press. Above everything I shall try to avoid being dull or tedious. The flat racing season of 1576 came to an end at. Warwick in November. It would be a tiresome job to review it, so I shall simply proceed at once to comment on coming events, the greatest of: which, the Derby, hat an interest for almost everybody. .., The first favourite a,t present is Chamant by Mortimer—Arauearia, a half brother to Camelia, demi-victriK of the Oaks, 1870 His early career. as a two-year-old was unfortunate, but after running several times unsuccessfully he won the Priory Stakes of £465 .at Lewes in July. He was brought out, after being unplaced, in the Champagne Stakes at Doncaster, for the. Middle Park Plate of £3860 at Newmarket second October Meeting ; but, as he had to carry Sst. 131b5., a weight with which the race, had never previously been won, he was not fancied, and started almoet friendless at 20 to 1. Lady Go-lightly, the Champagne Stakes winner, was favourite at 5 to 2 in a field ot over 20 horses. After a grand race, and punishing finish, Chamant, who was brilliantly ridden by Jim Goater,-just got his head in front of Pellfcgrino, who was the same distance in front of Plunger ; Lady Go-ligutly, close up, being fourth. The result was looked upon fby many as a fluke, but at the Houghton Meeting Plunger aud Chamant again met in the Dewliurst Plate ;" "and, in spite of the first-named receiving 51bs. extra from Ohamaut, the latter was again victorious, beating his opponent oven more decisively than in the Middle Park Plate. This stamped him as, without doubt, the best two-year-old we have seen, aud it will take a good colt to beat him at Epsom. The French are, as usual, very sanguine, and look upon another series of Gladiateur triumphs as a foregone conclusion. It would be scarcely fair to damp their spirits by • reminding them that no winne_r. ; pf the Middle Park Plate has ever yet managed. to carry off the blue riband. But if Chamant should never win another race he will yet have proved himself a cheap horse to Count Lagrauge.;. D.uring the past season he has earned" ;0y.er..£6000 in stakes alone. This reminds ma that' Lord Falmouth is urging on the Jookey r Clubs to lock up our races to the French if they .will not open theirs to us. Year after year they send over horses to run on every racecourse in the United but ours can never cross the Channel: except to compete for the Grand Prize." Very few professional books are as yet open on the Derby, as early betting has not of latter years proved at all profitable. Both Galopin and Kisber, the winners of '75 aud '70, were, it will be remembered, hot favourites throughout the winter. Until the spring, therefore, it is riot likely that the £20,000 men will commence to. operate, but some amateur pencillers (good men and true) are doing a fair amount of small business at the following prices : S to 1, Chamant (taken and wanted) ; S'to I,' Pellegriuo (taken and offered); 10 to 1, Rob Roy (taken to £100) ; 100 to S, Plunger (taken and offered); 100 to 6, Lady Golightly (taken freely); 1000 to 45, Actieon • (taken); 1000 to 40, Bay Athol (taken)'; 1000 to 30, Central fire (offered). Grand Prize of Paris :—S to 1, Chamant; and 10 to 1; Jongleur. At 20 to 1, I fancy Lady Golightly, especially for hedging purposes. The filly belongs to Lord Falmouth, and if ahe starte will be ridden by Archer, which fact alone should bring her to a very short price.'' Tho Oaks is a certainty for her, so much' so that I doubt, if any bookmaker would lay 100 to 1 against her for the double event. Pollegriuo is trained by Robert Peck, who was so long associated, with Mr. Merry's yellow and black. There is always danger from his quarter. . The- colt, belongs to tile Duke of "Westminster, whoso victory would be very popular. Plunger is owned by Mr. A. Baltazzi, , - brother tp the possessor of the renowced Kisber. He ia a great big animal who will improve with time. Fred. Archer heads the list of winning jockeys for 1576. During the season from March to November he has ridden no less than 654 rides, 20G of which have been successful. This is an altogether unparalleled achievement, which quite throws the great deeds of Greimshaw , and Fordham into the shade. What his earnings may be it is hard to say. For winning the Ciesarewitch alone ho received £1000. His success shows what steadiness and sterling horesty in his profession may do. Train up a jockey in the way he should go, and when he gets fat he will have plenty to live upon. Constable, who stands next on the list, rode 3013 times, only winning 74. Steele, the Leviathan bookmaker, has turned his brother ringmen green with envy. Both in the Cresarewiteh aud Cambridgeshire he "kept" Rosebery to run for his book. At Liverpool he not only did the same with Footstep, but absolutely backed her out and out to win, taking 1000 to 20 whenever he could get it. He is supposed to have pocketed at least £150,000 o,yer the three meetings. Where Mr. Steele got his information about Footstep is a dark mystery, for neither owner nor trainer fancied her, as is proved by tho latter having only one bet (500 to 10) on the race.

The illegitimate or steeplechasing season opened at Croydon on the2Sth of November, and the two chief races o£ the meeting are the first events which I have to describe.

The Grand International Hurdle Race, of two miles and a quarter, over nine hurdles, brought a field of 14 to the post. Lord Dupplin's Woodcock, a very young hurdleracer was made favourite, .and backed down to 3 to 1 and 7 to 2, the latter being closing price. Foudro de Guerre at 4 to I, and Antidote at 5 to one also found friends. The result was in almost exact accordance with the betting, Woodcock, after a fine race, beating Antidote by a length, whilst Foudre de Guerre managed to get third. The winner is only 4 years old. On the flat he never could get his head first for Lord Portsmouth, who eventually sold him in disgust, when he got rid. of Roland Graeme. Lord Duppliu lias been in rare luck lately. He is reported to have won largely over Woodcock's victory. Nine ran for the Great Metropolitan Steeplechase of 4 miles, the winner turning up in a fine Irish mare called Pride of Kildarei'who started at the nice price of 10 to 1. Congress, the favourite, was nowhere, a French horse, Wild Monarch, being second, and Lancet, who likes this course, third. I hear that Captain Machell is confident of again winning the great Steeplechase at Liverpool next year. itegaUis favourite at present, but I don't think she will remain so when the weights appear. A few pottering books are open on the Waterloo Coursing Cup, which comes off in February, but the quotations do not signify much, except that Honeymoon is, in spite o£ last year's defeat, likely to be a hotter favourite than ever. Petrarch, winner of the Two Thousand 1 Guineas and St. Leger is again for sale. If lie were a cup horse I suspect this would not be so. When Lord Duppliu and Captain Oliphant gave £10,000 for him, last winter, they were sneered at as a couple of fools, but results show that they were right. In stakes alone the colt has won more than this. As to beta, we know positively that some £SO,OOO was pulled off over his St. Leger victory. He will be valuable as a stud horse, being the best-looking, as well as the most successful of the defunct Lord Clifden's progeny. . Mr. Ohaplin, who has just married the belle of the last London season—Lady Florence Leveson-Gower —will, I am told on good authority, bo shortly raised tq the peerage. What a successful career hie has been ! I wonder if he cares to be reminded of the Hermit conspiracy. Next month I hope to send you a lot ot exclusive information about the classic racos, Waterloo Cup, &c , together with the entries for the Lincolnshire Handicap, Chester Cup, and other big spring handicaps. Meantime, —Adieu. .

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18770217.2.27.4.5

Bibliographic details

SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME., New Zealand Herald, Volume XIV, Issue 4760, 17 February 1877, Supplement

Word Count
1,509

SPORTING NOTES FROM HOME. New Zealand Herald, Volume XIV, Issue 4760, 17 February 1877, Supplement

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