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SPORTING.

Th* uncertainty of raring recently exemplified at Melbourne, in the contest for the r * n % < 3pP> t Wpe»T" to . h«Te been further demonstrated at the contest for thiß 100 th English St, Leger, which took place at Doncaster, September 13 th, when Kisber was defeated. Withthe exception of the Derby, it is the greatest race in the world, and the following details, called from the Field, will be read with interest:—"A capital start was effected, All Heart rushing to the front, followed by Julius Csesar, Hellenist, and Coltneaa, and the favonrite lying well with his horses, and the rear being brought up by Wild Tommy. Before they had gone a quarter of a mile, Osborne worked Kisber to the front, and, as they disappeared over the hill, he held a clear lead. He continued in front, going like great guns up to half-a-I mile from home, when he was joined by Petrarch; Wild Tommy, who had been gradually improving his position, coming up on the outside. But Kisber was still pulled hard, and his backers confident when, almost quicker than it takes to tell, Osborne was seen to be uneasy on liim ; another second or two, and a great cry of ' The favourite's beat !' rent the air. It was too true. Osborne was calling on him at the bend witaout avail, aud Pet-, rarch came on, with Wild Tommy in close attendance. For an anxious moment or two, Petrarch's backers held their breath ; but though the challenge of Wild Tommy was a resolute one, Petrarch gamely stalled it off; did not swerve when Goater gave him whip and spur, and won a fine race by a neck. Of course, there were two wonderful surprises in the race—the unexpected wonderful running of Wild Tommy, against whom 100 to 1 was freely offered, and the yet greater surprise, the defeat of Kisber. He overpowered, it is said, Osborne, and ran himself to a standstill. Lord Dupplin's Petrarch, Ist; Duke of Hamilton's Wild Tommy, 2nd; Mr. Gee's Julius Ccesar, 3rd. Nine ran.

Some time ago it was rumoured that the' celebrated Middle Park stud at Eltham, England, was to be brought to the hammer, and the following particulars respecting it will be found interesting :—Mr. William Blenkiron, the founder of the Middle Park stud, it will be remembered, died on the 25th of September,; 1871, and the whole of his magnificent stud of brood mares and stallions were brought to the hammer in a four days* sale, held in the July following, when the total amount realised was upwards of 102,000 guineas, this being irrespective of the sums of 17,000 and 6000 guineas obtained by the two yearling sales of the preceding June and July. On the death of his father, Mr. Blenkiron, the present owner of the Middle Park stud, retained the breeding establishment, aud some few of the sires and mares, and has since carried it on successfully, adding to it year by year, until it has almost reached the proportions of the old stud. Mr. Blenkiron's stud includes 110 thoroughbred brood mares, of which eight are by King Tom, ten by Newminstor, son of Touchstone, seven by Stockwell, four by Rataplan, and the remainder by Touchstone. Birdcatcher, Macaroni, Weatherbit, Wild Dayrell, Voltigeur, Marsyas, Kingston, Dundee, and others, many with foals by Bosicrucian, Victorious, Vespasian, Saunterer, and Galopin. Besides these, there are eight stallions and 20 yearlings. Perkins, the champion walker of Great Britain, recently won a great match at Brighton, accomplishing eight miles within the hour. The backer of time giving £150 to £100. These odds, however, were actually laid on the walker at the start. He went off at a great rate, walking very erect, and taking long lurching strides, and going exceedingly fast. Perkins continued is rapid pace, and' accomplished his first mile in 6 minutes 20 seconds. All went on well with him to the fifth mile, when he faltered in his gait, and evidently was somewhat distressed. He, however, gamely struggled on, and completely recovered when 5i miles had been covered. From this point of the journey Perkins appeared fresh and well, and maintaining his great pace the remaining distance, accomplished the eight miles in the unprecedented time of 58 minutes 29 seconds, pulling up but slightly distressed. He is a Londoner, 23 years of age, 5 feet 5J inches in height, and weighs 9st. lOlbs. He is very well made, with broad shoulders, a strong, short back, and. long, muscular thighs, and walks with the most scrupulous fairness.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18761118.2.16

Bibliographic details

SPORTING., New Zealand Herald, Volume XIII, Issue 4685, 18 November 1876

Word Count
754

SPORTING. New Zealand Herald, Volume XIII, Issue 4685, 18 November 1876

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