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Regatta-day is drawing near, but snbscriptions towards the prizes are coming to hand very slowly. The committee who have undertaken the duties of collecting will have to use their utmost persuasive powers to enable the treasurer to present a balance sheet with a balance on the credit side, after regatta-day is over. Notwithstanding the apparent apathy of those who can afford to put their hand in their pockets, the club in arranging the prizes have received the amount given last year, and the total sum to be competed for, in the fourteen races is set down as £335. The courses and hours of starting are also arranged, and a few defects in the arrangements of the 1575 regatta have been remedied for this year's. The night of general entry is fixed for Thursday the 27th inst., the entries-for 4hfr amateur races being receivable ori'SaS|K@jf22nd inst. For the principal . scb.ooners;aml-.cu,tters7 I&ecjj>s?«rais-proba-bility of there. being, jiiuflarous entries,, and altogether the'programme/of this year!*; regatta may be looked forward .to as -being an attractive one. The '.Regatta Club haye..she advantage of distingnishedpatronage'i.'iffio'if support. In instance of thiß, r HIaJ the Governor has consented, jfcJjrpiiEJbJjJjjsVpiir, vate secretary to bec6iu6ss/-"Patron. -His. Honor the Superintendent iias-also intiinatefl' his consent to be Vice-Patron/ .The chairman.; of the Harbour Board has agreed.JSi.fe&Jom'e,; President, and. His AVorship the Mayor vic& President. The only addition accrued to the funds through this source is £5 enclosed in Captain Daldy's letter.

Yesterday morning, about a quarter-past 11 o'clock, a light cavt, belonging to one John Sullivan, said to reside in the Chapel Square, was being driven at a gentle pace down the declivity o£ Wellesley-street East (the new road). -At about one-third of the incline one of the irons clamping the righthand spring to the carriage snapped, and the vehicle became tilted to one side. The horse became frightened, and dashed forward. In a few yards the left-hand one broke also, and as the animal swerved to one side in his terror, the whole of the body came off the perch and overturned, smashing the off-side shaft, aud throwing the horse completely over. The driver (Sullivan) was thrown violently on to the road, and stunned. There was an immediate rush to the place, aud a number of the bystanders carried the man to a convenient place, where, by proper applications, he was soon restored. In the meantime Mr. Talbot, the secretary to the Mechanics' Institute, remembering that he had seen Dr. Dawson at a house in the proximity, ran and brought that gentleman to the scene. The doctor, however, soon found that there was nothing serious the matter, and that the man had most miraculously escaped with a severe shaking. He had scarcely a bruise on him, and in a very short time was able to assist in repairing the shattered remains of the cart. The horse was almost entirely uninjured.

Complaints, which have proved to be groundless upon investigation, have on one or two occasions been made against the providore of the A.S.P. Co's. steamers. Notwithstanding these assertions by mal-con-tents, it is generally known and admitted by persons travelling in these steamers in both classes, that no expense is spared to supply a first-class table at each meal, both at sea and in port. Any person on the wharf on Saturday afternoon, would have been struck with the quantity of supplies of live stock, and fresh meat of excellent quality sent down to the Llewellyn, the greater portion of which is being forwarded as stores for the Star of the South at Fiji. The stock thus ordered by the providore may be enumerated as follows:—20 sheep, 7001bs. guaranteed corned beef, sides of beef, carcasses of mutton and lamb, veal, nearly ICO sheep and ox-ton-gues, lambs fries, oxtails, tripe, &c, independent of poultry and other stock. Contrary to usage, no distinction is made in catering between the saloon and steerage passengers, officers and crew. The same quality of meat is supplied to the steerage and forecastle as that placed on the cabin table.

A most amusing occurrence took place yesterday afternoon near Newmarket. A troop of donkeys recently purchased by Mr. Robert Graham for the sports to be held at Ellerslie Gardens on the 29th instant, were being driven down the Kyber Pass Road, and when nearly opposite Seccombe's brewery, the whole of the troop, numbering thirteen, stopped of one accord and began that peculiar kind of music peculiar to the donkey tribe. In vain the Jehu seated on the hindmost one whipped and shouted, not an inch would they move. An old lady and gentleman from the village of Panmure happened to be driving past at the time. The horse took fright at the music produced by the donkeys, and turned sharply to one side, overturning the chaise and precipitating the pair into the gutter, happily without doing them any injury. Seeing what had happened the asses gave one prolonged bray and trotted down the hill, never stopping till pulled up by the worthy toll-keeper at the Junction Hotel. A pecuniary difficulty settled, they proceeded quietly on their way to the Gardens, where great amusement was caused by some of the visitors trying a preliminary canter round the course.

We understand that the Royal Mail Hotel, (late Central) Ngaruawahia, has been purchased from Mr. A. Cairns, by Mr. Henry Hoag, late proprietor of the Prince of Wales Hotel, Bay of Islands. Mr. Hoag, like his predecessor at the Royal Mail, was formerly known as a successful and obliging providore in the steam coastal service, but has relinquished the sea to settle on shore. The hotel at Ngaruawahia in his hands is sure to be well conducted. We wish him continued success in bis new.venture.

The returns of immigration and emigration at the port of Dunedin, for the year 1575, had been published in the Otago papers. The total amount of the-former is 9,130, and the latter 1,712. Thus leaving a difference in favour of immigration of 7.43S souls. The Chinese arrived at Dunedin numbered 746 during the year.

The large and well-conducted meeting, held on-Saturday evening at the Theatre Boyal," fully bore out the character of the Thames community as a law-abiding, though suffering people. The chair was occupied by his Worship the Mayor, and the platform sustained the leading mercantile men, who shewed sympathy with the object in view.' The (speeches, and resolutions carried were temperate, and such as to recommend themselves to "every well-wisher "of the district. The meeting revealed pretty plainly the-past State and present prospects o£ the Thames, "and Droved beyond a doubtthat our labourinc classes, as a rule, are provident; and only owing io the thrift, the.facility of saving, even upon small but regular wages, our population have been enabled to meet the preseHt depressions, the continuance -of which, however, must dry up their resources and tell upon their patience. There are large numbers out of work, and those in employ receive but small wages ; many have left the place, but the majority of our miners are married, or otherwise wedded to the locality, that precludes their leaving ; and sustained by a faith in the resources of the Thames, they are loth to leave, and would be content to accept such temporary relief—in the shape of road or bridge-making—as the trf>vernment would give. If the Goyernmant had done its duty, and backed up the ehorts of the Waiotahi Highway Board, and made a f-oad to the back country, rendering the district available, the probability is that no meeting of unemployed miners would have been held. Now that the emergency has arisen, it is evident steps need to be taken to meet it, the means to accomplish which are to hand, and the Government should not be asked and prayed for relief, while they themselves have been the main cause of the distress. It is monstrous that the act of any Government or Premier should be tolerated, that could step in and take the only money raised for a special service, and by a special tax, from a people payiug more taxes than any others in the colony, and apply the goldtields revenue to pay off debts attached to the mismanagement of railways, from which the Thames people receive no shadow of benefit. It is unstatesmanlike, impolitic, and will tell against the perpetrator with a force that cannot be resisted by the sledge-hammer of public opinion. There are several legitimate and reproductive works that could be immediately set about; besides opening up the back country, there is the large reservoir needed to utilise the ltauwaeranga waterworks —now all but finished—tho water running to waste; the formation of bridges, and from tue apathy displayed in the matfctor, it appears as if the authorities were waiting for the drowning of some notable, nineteen common persons not being sufficient inducement. There is also tho forming of roads in tho Waitekauri and other districts. The policy of the Government all through has been obstructive, bo far as the mining industry has been concerned. From the fact of keeping the neighbouring lands shut out from the public, hundreds and thousands have left the Thames who would otherwise havo stayed ; and the inability to do so by those remaining compels the eating up o£ resources, and throws the community into a semi-pauperised condition, —a state that should not exist, and could be averted with ordinary judgment, while the present position points to a studied policy of degrading the Thames community.—[Thames Correspondent.]

An important cause was tried yesterday in Jlie Supremo Court, before Mr. Justice Gillies tfffl a special jury. It was an action, brought bylthe administrators under the will of the teXs Captain Butler, of Mongouui, against .[fcitgrowners of the steamer Ho wena, to recover damages for the injuries caused to the late Captain Butler resulting in his death. The action was brought on behalf of the widow and four children of the deceased. The damages claimed were £2250, calculated upon the basis, which appears in our report of the proceedings. The facts of the case were few, but the evidence in respect to the nature and consequences of the injuries were intricate and voluminous. The facts were that Captain Butler, in coming from the Rowena, had to cross a x>lauk which, not being firmly placed tilted, throwing him against thewharf, causing a fracture of the left arm and one of his ribs ; these injuries developing a state of internal disorder, which terminated fatally. The defence was that it was purely accidental; that Captain Butler himself was contributory to what occurred, and his representatives could not recover. The jury found all the issues arising out of the plaintiff's declaration in the affirmative, thus establishing the tort, but upon the eleventh issue, which was based upon the defendant's plea, that the injuries and death were caused by the contributory negligence o£ the deceased, the jury came to the Court for further direction. His Honor said if any person, knowing the existence of danger, through want of ordinary precaution met with an injury, he was the author of his own wrong, and could not recover damages for that injury as against another person. It was another feature of the case that Captain Butler lived sonio fourteen months after the alleged injury was received, and attributed the injuries to accident. The injury to which death was attributed was. alleged to be the result of natural causes, and was in course of development for two years. The jury found for the defendant on all the iesues— damages, nil. The Court at 10 o'clock at night adjourned to 10 o'clock this morning. The case Vickery t. Souter and Macky will be the first called.

The annual meeting of the parishioners of St. Mary's, Parnell, will be held on Thursday evening next, at seven o'clock, in the parochial school-house, Scarborough Terrace. Tho business will be the consideration of the report and balance-sheet for the year just past, and the election of churchwardens and vestrymen for the ensuing period of twelve months. In anticipation of the meeting, it may be remarked • that the returns appear to be of a highly satisfactory character, and shew that partly through the efforts of the Venerable Archdeacon, partly through the efforts of the Church officers, and partly through the endeavours of those other few who have taken the work of the Church in hand, the inhabitants of Parnell have at length become to some extent awakened to a sense of their long-stand-ing apathy and want of zeal. Of course, on Thursday, there will be a discussion on matters involved in the report. Until after the meeting it would be premature to dilate on the matters contained in it or on the result of tho balance-sheet.

A very successful soiree, followed by an amateur concert, and a dance took place in Onehunga on Thursday evening. The proceeds are to be devoted to painting St. Peter's Church, and thanks to the public who so liberally patronised it, and to the ladies who generously provided the tea, the object was attained. This concert was very good; there is no small amount of musical talent in Onehunga, and Mrs. Mitchell and Sir. Hoffman rendered assistance which was much appreciated. It is needless to say that at the concluding \)ortion of the evening's entertainment a dance was entered into con amort, and at midnight all separated well pleased.

Return of sick treated at the Provincial Hospital for the week ended Saturday, January 15,1S76: —Remained last return, 81; admitted since, 15 ; discharged, 11 j died, 3 ; remaining, S2 (males, 71; females, 11). Aγ. rangement of cases :—Zymotic, IS ; constitutional, 10; local, 35; developmental, 4; violent, 15. Three deaths occurred during the week, viz.—lst: C. T., male, aged 44 years, on January 9th, of brain disease ; 2nd : J. C.j male, aged 24 years, on same day, of typhoid fever; 3rd: J G., male, aged 54 years, on January 12th, of cancer of jaw and neck.

Wβ understand that a large picnic is to take place at Ellerslie Gardens on Wednesday next. The children belonging to the Sundayschools at Otahuhu, Woodside, and Panl mtire, under the caro of the Rev. Sir. Gould. will partake of a treat provided for them by that gentleman. The annual treat usually takes place at Woodside, but the superior attractions offered at the gardens and a special arrangement made with the general manager of the railway have induced the promoters of the picnic to choose the latter place.

A country settler named Kiley -was charged at the Police Court yesterday morning with a. breach of the Eailway .Regulations, by tendering to the ticket collector, on the sth instant, a ticket bearing date November 19. Defendant pleaded not guilty, and affirmed that he had received the ticket at Newmarket, on the oth instant, and paid'3s 6d for it. Several witnessee'employed on the railway by their evidence effectually disproved this statement. It was also proved that besides contradicting himself in the evidence which he gave, the defendant had attempted to foist on to the railway official a ticket which bore the words "Auckland to Drury," whereas if it bad been. JE>btaine<i at Ne~wmarkeT it 'would have had "printed. Oil its face, to Drury." It was clearly apparant from the first that the defendant's story was wholly without foundation, and His Worship therefore imposed the full penalty, £5, which, including costs, foots up to the respectable little sum of £7 ISs, for a trip by rail to the pleasant glades of Drury. We hope that this example will be borne in mind by all persons imbued with the idea that they can easily obtain a passage in the train by using an old ticket, which through somo oversight they havo been allowed to retain.

The Okinemuii correspondent of the Thames Advertiser, who is well informed iu native matters, has the following respecting the killing of the native for witchcraft: — " From the East Coast I hear that a native, named Petera Koikoi, who formerly resided in this district, has been put to death for practising ' makutu' (witchcraft). It appears that he had been suspected for some time, and it is said that he »ven boasted of his powers. A few days ago a native, named Teniki, died at Mataora, firmly believing that he had been bewitched by Petara, who had left for Tairua shortly before his death. I hear that the deceased's son (Akuhata) then went to see Mr. Commissioner Clarke on tliis subject, and wanted to have Petera arrested and tried for murder. Of course, Mr. Clarke could not see his way clear to do so, owing to the want of evidence, whereupon Akunata said that the Maoris would have to take the matter into their own hands. Accordingly, a number of natives'went in a boat to Tairua, whore they found Petera, and took him on board. They then pulled out to sea, and told him that they intended to kill him. He did not seem at all alarmed, but leaned his head over the gunwale of the boat when told to do so.- I am informed that a native named Hipirini then gave him a blow with a tomahawk, which nearly severed the head from the body. When off Otahu a sudden squall upset the boat, and they lost all their arms and a quantity of ammunition. They righted tho boat, and finding that Petcra's body had not sunk, they decided to land and bury it at Otahu."

At the commencement of the year the new method adopted by the English and Australian Telegraph Cable Company, of allowing single word messages, came into force. Hitherto the minimum message was ten words, but under the new system a message can be sent if the addresses are registered, containing only one word. The minimum of ten words is done away with, and a charge is made for each word. The followiug are the conditions under which cable messages are now transmitted: —l. The length of the word is limited to a maximum of 10 letters. 2. Only ordinary dictionary words should be used; artificially constructed words are subject to the cipher rate. 3. Groups of figures may be transmitted, and will be charged at the rate of five to the word if expressing ordinary commercial quotations ; but if used for code purposes, will be subject to the cypher rate. 4. Groups of letters or artificially-constructed words will-be treated in the same manner as figures. 5. Cipher telegrams must be collated, i.e., repeated baok in their entirety from station to station. Half-r.ato extra is the charge for collating. 6. Any combination of code employing in the same message groiips~of figures and letters is strictly prohibited, and telegrams composed in this manner cannot be accepted. 7. Addressee may bo written in code at the sender's risk under arrangement with the administration concerned. The signature may also be a code word, or the last word of the message may replace it. S. The followiug abbreviated forms for expressing—reply paid, E. 1 ,. ; acknowledgement of receipt, C.R. ; collating T.C.; and telegram to follow, P. S.—have been agreed to, so that only one word need be paid for to convey these instructions. The scale of charges, inclusive of names and addresses from any station in South Australia to Europe is 10s. 6d per word, and to America from 13s. 6d. to 14s. 4d. per word.

Few of the improvements made in Queenstrebt during the last few years are more gratifying to the eye than those made by Mr. H. Sommervell and Mr. E. Waters. The old wooden structures at the corner of "Vulcan Lane were not only eye-sores, but were becoming dangerous to life and limb. The handsome shops just completed by Mr. Waters, and occupied by Mr. JR. W. Dyson, draper, add considerably to the beauty of the block. The lower part of Mr. Dyson's shop ia conveniently stocked with all that an ordinary mortal can require in the shape of clothes, from infancy to old age, while the upper part of the shop is set apart for carpets and furnishing goods. Mr. Dyson lias been singularly unfortunate in being disturbed so many times in business through fires and other causes, but with admirable tenacity he has stuck to Queen-street, and has at last settled down, permanently, we hope, in one of the best positions in town. .As he has spared no pains or expense to render his shop attractive and suitable for the rapid discharge of business, we wish him all the success he has done so much to deserve.

It is satisfactory to find that in spite of many difficulties the works at the Breakwater enlargement are being carried on in a vigorous manner. Messrs. McCabe and Walsh, the contractors, deserve the utmost credit for the manner in which they have now almost brought the work to a conclusion. They have had to contend against bad weather, unanticipated difficulties in laying down the facing stones, and hampered arrangements at the entrance to their works, which have very much hindered them at. times. At present they are getting on as fast possible, and utilising every low tide by laying the foundation. The present springtides have come to their aid, and a. great deal ofworkhasbeendone during thelastfew days, and this work is of the most solid description and does vast credit to those who really were thefirsttostrikeouttheideaofusingscoria-asb. instead of puzzolana earth in the concoction of cement. Not that there could possibly be much difference in quality, for they are both the products of volcanic eruptions.

A report reached Grahamstown on Sunday evening, to the effect that two men, Mr. George Crawford, butcher, of Tapu, and an old man, were missing. It appears that Mr. Crawford and the man referred to came to Grahamstown on Saturday morning as usual in an open boat for a supply of meat. They left for Tapu again in the boat at about midday on Saturday, and have not since been heard of. Uneasiness was caused in Tapu by their continued absence, and on Sunday afternoon Mr. Hawks rode along the beach to Grahamstown, making inquiries on his way, but has been unable to ascertain anything regarding them from the time they left Grahamstown in the boat.

We regret to learn that Mr. Francis Mulgrove, who received injuries from being thrown out of his trap on Friday last in Upper Queen-street, has expired in the Hospital. The deceased, -was a dairy farmer, and resided at Papakura. Unfortunately he leaves a -wife and seven children to mourn his loss. The cause of death is stated'to be the fracture of two ribs over, the heart. An inquest will be held at the Hospital this afternoon. . !

• State of Her Majesty's gaol, Auckland, for •week-ended' Jan. -15, 1876 :—On.remand,- 1 !male; awaiting trial, 1 male; penal servitude, 36 males; hard labour, 72 males, , 30 females; imprisonment, 2 females ; default of bail, 3 males; received during the week, 14 males ; discharged during week, 17 males, 2 females. Total in gaol, 113 males, 32 females.

. A meeting of electors of the NVirfVo?~"yK * and Lake districts was held in the T1 t port hall last evening. The object was to obtain a united vote in favour e gllt ;; " of the candidates, in order to opnosl *? e '? ! return of Dr. Leo as the representaK ■ •'■' i the district. The friends of the oft* t?candidates were present, but beino t * e ' ;: ; afraid of each other as of Dr. Letw? c K ! it was simply impossible for them to cobK D ' : ' ■ against him. After considerable disoms?" ! and when resolutions, affirmincr tli j , ' ! stability of their conduct had I the electors refused to vote to pled™ «. ,£ ! selves with the majority of the meeEfcV s ?"■'■- t itself this was sufficient to defeat the ob" t I for -which they had assembled,-bttfcTifivS-: > was . thought the sense of the meeting mi U' be taken by ballot, and that some would t 1 I guided by it. This, as well, was-a failn "' As soon as the ballot papers, andthepaw" I not used in the ballot, were taken to tt "" chairman, he emptied them both on tv S table and mixed them past recovery TV* meeting then separated without having obtained any practical result. - ™; ;

The annual meeting "for the election the District School Committee was held the school-room, Devonport, last evenia Mr. It. Sommerville - occupied the chair About fifteen persons were present. TK' report for the past year was first read, n congratulated the district-u'pou the increas in the attendance at the school, the average' number of scholars having been 120. 'if. report- also stated that the master and asia, tauts at the school had given every satisfach&i \ During the past year the school had-been A enlarged at a cost of £50 odd, and its accent'*' modation very materially increased. T(, 6 t folio wing gentlemen we're then proposed and elected unopposed as the School Committee for the ensuing year:—Messrs. Buchanan. Brown, Niccol, Cameron, and Bullock. MrSommerville, the late chairman of the Board: '■ was also proposed, but declined to standj.'as he was about to leavo the district. A vote of thanks to the old''committee concluded the business. ."■- . . ' "■ --.. ■--.'

The occupants of' the Junction: Hotel:, were disturbed . during yesteaday by'ty. actions of a young man who was evidently ill an insane state from the effects of drink Having located himself in a paddock adjoin; ing the house,, he conceived the idea tint his life was to be destroyed by the process: ! of drowning, to prevent which he took means ! that this should not -be carried out. ArlSe.- j poor fellow was becoming a nuisance to the 5 neighbourhood the landlord sent word to the' i police, and Sub-Inspector Pardy therefore ' ' despatched a constable to take charge of 1 8 him. Shortly after ten last night Constable • s Smith brought the man to town in a dog.' ji cart, and he was at once taken care of by jj the police. At the station the man ap. peared to be labouring under the apprehej. | sion that he was about to be hanged, and : | constantly repeated portions of the litany, g A. medical examination will be held to-day; ; ] i We give elsewhere the whole of tllo.re'. 5 turns which could possibly be p the elections of the Bay of Islands and?oH • Rodney, all the polling places being giro ! except two in each district. For several.| the returns in the case of Rodney Ve; lia'vV S to acknowledge our indebtednees to the pro:' 1 prictors of the Evening Star, who placed 1 1 our disposal the returns reaching their office : & after the publication of their paper. TJh ■ $ polling places in Rodney are at considerable, 1distances from each other, and in severs! } instances the returns were conveyed bj special messengers to the nearest telegraph', station. ' j? The Otago Daily Times has the following, with reference to the pigeon' shooting.; match:—."lt will be seen by our telograms from Auckland, that some mistake hasjxy curred in firing for the InterproviricM Pigeon Shooting-match. It appears thattbi | Northern men fired at 10 birds, instead>oi 13 as stated in the conditions. Mr. S/ G. Smith, the captain of the Dunedin teamj i% forms us that the terms of the match Ti'cil? distinctly stated to the Auckland com-? petitions, and the fault lies with thorn.- £ Our men refuse to give up the trophy unds: 'i the circumstances, though the Auckland® claim a victory ; but the Dunedin team an quite willing to shoot the match over again, and this, we think, a fair offer. Mr. T. tt J Dodson certainly has our sympathies ill tliil % unfortunate misunderstanding, for his excst I lent shooting entitled him beyond donbt tr | the coveted trophy. fjg } There have been issued by the City CoinS | cil for the present year 132 licenses for cart?,' - 46 for drivers, and two for lodging-houses.| Ninety-eight private carts have been re- I gistered. We would again remind all tag; | cerned of the personal loss and | they avo likely to suffer if they ply for hint .• without being duly licensed. Lodging- | houses which receive people for one nighty| only also require to be licensed, and failing /by) this the proprietors are liable to a consider-; j: able penalty. : § Some natives have come down from they King country to enlighten tlio natives of this. g district as to what .was said and done at thej J late meeting at Hikuraugi. They say that. Sir George Grey has written to them to the* BS effect that all lands bought for less thaniffi their value (for needles, &c.,), either by Go-v|§ vemment or'private parties, will have to be pt returned, and that if he did not succeed he would go to England to see the Queen aboot :fc it.—Oliinemuri correspondent of the tiser. i. We have so frequently complained mismanagement of our railways that we are ma exceedingly loth, for our. readers Bakes, to do so again. We may, however, direct at.. .. tention to the correspondence which irM;: print elsewhere, from which it will besea.s| that the Government are not left m lgnw- pe ance of the state of affairs. We hope lit, ;,r, Lamb will] persevere in his efforts till a » form is effected. it,. On January 13 two young ladies were ti-psa mitted as novices into the religions o.'der & Our Lady of Mary, at St. Mary s KomnCgta Catholic Cathedral, Wellington. The ladies fe were Miss Mary Ward (a niece of Bishop £]§ Redwood) and Miss Margaret Kirk. i The City Council held its usuul fortmghfljifej meeting yesterday afternoon, His Worehip*M the Mayor in the chair. There were present Councillors Cosgrave, Buchanan, and Vo: .y, der Heyde. A considerable amount of bM - ness was gone through, a detailed reportjf;p which will be found elsewhere. • fj .fo

At the Police Station last evening J* l , 4 named Patrick Kavanagh -was in ou tonyte larceny of several articles of jewellery rate? ■ at £S, the property of Mr. Lindsey w '■■ will be brought up at the Police Court morning. The members of the City East School S \ Committee, elected at the annual ratepayers on the 14th instant, met t* • day, and elected the Rev. C. M chairman and Mr. E. T. Talbot secretary f«*j,i the ensuing year. » \ A very faithful sketch in water coloun" ' - Auckland harbour looking east, is now jf executed by an artist named Mr OgUj 1 *• The view is taken from the summit of *B tomart Point. The painting will shortly «t i on view. ff ~

We -would again remind our readers tjjj M__ Mr. Ewington's lecture on "Philip."" M Second of Spain" comes off this evening. »> gs 7.30, at the rooms of the "Soung Christian Association, Wellesley- treet •"»? ,4 lecture is given in. aid of the building W"? •? of the Mount Eden school, and. this, »P»?j- ?.* from the interesting character of the Bj* £ torical subject chosen for exposition, oOW to secure a good attendance. There w* pM ( also bechoice selections of appropriate m" 8 " by the choir. j> The ordinary meeting of ehaieholdeW j» j the Hauraki Saw-mill Company will he W" <■ < at Mr. Bennett's office, Shortland street, » , February?.'' . . ' t'&t'i 1 A notice in reference to a, meeting oi *" f| A creditors of Charles Burton; a bankrnpti %A < pears in our advertisement columns fti | J The eighth, annual : general meeting " t | shareholders in th^ . Bay of Islands W» J J Company will be held-on the 28th in t Aft » The Misses Anaties' boarding a nd o ' school will re-opea on Tuesday, the J inst. Jpi

DEATH OF MB. W. T. BUCKLAND. It 13 with deep regret that we announce the death, of William. Thome Buckland, who was one of our oldest and most energetic settlers, one o£ onr moat prominent politicians, and w ho was greatly beloved by all for his frank, straightforward, and truthful disposition. -£•;' ; '' Mr.i-Buckland's death has been very sudden; Yesterday week he attended the nomination for the Franklin district at New. market, where he was nominated, in order to make a speech, after doing which lie withdrew. Indeed, it was well known that prior to last session he had made up Ms mind not to seek for re-election. Immediately after 'the nomination he left for Waikato, and it is thought that he injured himself by a long journey in the heat of the sun. He had intended to remain for some time on his ran in "Waikato, but feeling ill he returned . to his house at Remuera. When he arrived there it was evident he was suffering from paralysis, which continually increased till he lost the use of one of his arms. After some time he appeared to bo regaining tho use of his arm; but on Thursday last erysipelas set in, and as he was of a lusty habit of body, he continued to sink until yesterday afternoon, when he expired. . ,„.<, Mr. Bucldand came to Auckland in 1841, from Adelaide; so that he has been a settler here for thirty-five years. Shortly after his arrival he commenced business as a butcher, and by energy and diligence he yearly increased his business. At an early period he took a contract for supplying the troops, which he held for a good many years till he gave up his business in town, and commenced farming. In this pursuit he shewed the same energy and diligence as in everything he put his hand to. Since the te-mi-nation of the war he has dealt considerably in native lands, and on the whole he has been successful in his sometimes risky speculations. He has now a large run in tho Upper Waikato. From an early period, Mr. Buckland has taken, an active interest in the political affairs of the country. a member of the first Provincial Council of Auekland, and wa3 called to the first Executive formed by Mr. John Williamson. We believe he has continued a member of the Provincial Council ever since. He has also represented an Auckland constituency in several Parliaments, and in almost. every political movement which excited any general interest in the community, Mr. Buckland took a part. We need say little of the character of the deceased, which had in it many really noble traits. Everyone who came into contact with Mr. Buckland soon formed an estimate respecting him, and never had occasion to change it, excepting that with closer acquaintance a deeper impression was invariably obtained of his good-heartedness and generosity. Ho was impnlsive to a degree, and so had the faults of a generous and impnlsive disposition—sometimes forming conclusions hastily, and always urging his opinions with outspoken vehemence. But lie waa honest, frank, and cordial, and even those who were most bitterly opposed to him had never any reason .to make their difference a cause of breach of friendship with the man. He might be guilty of a hasty, word or a rash action, but he was 'ntterly incapable of meanness in either word or deed. There are few men who will leave behind them such an impression of manly generosity and scorn of littleness as Mr. Buckland, and known as he was to almost every settler ia the province, wo are quite sure that there will be but one feeling to-day throughout the province respecting him. Mr. Buckland leaves a large family, all of them grown up. JUe was fifty-six years of age. .The funeral will take place to-morrow at three o'clock.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZH18760118.2.13

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume XIII, Issue 4424, 18 January 1876

Word Count
5,885

New Zealand Herald New Zealand Herald, Volume XIII, Issue 4424, 18 January 1876

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