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PARLIAMENTARY.

The programme of the new Government is before us, and we must confess to thinking it, on the whole, one exhibiting a large amount of common practical sense. It is true that but little is promised tliis session, but that is no more than we expected, since it would be absurd to expect a Ministry so lately and hurriedljr formed, to be in a position to take up at once, and without delay, the entire business of the country, aud carry the same out in detail. All large aud important questions will be considered during the recess. The chief business of this session will be to create a commission to inquire into the working of the Civil Service, aud report to the House next session. The stamp on cheques, as well as receipts, is to be reduced to a penny, which will be satisfactory news to most people. Northern road works are to be remembered, and money voted, but never expended, by the late Government, is now to be laid out. All works, moreover, where possible, are to be let by public tender. An Education Act is to be prepared during the recess, as also a .Native Lands Act Amendment Bill. There is to be as much reduction in ordinary expenditure as possible, so as to enable the income of the colony to cover its expenses. Of separation, the Ministry will not hear, but will endeavour to remove the causes which at present conduce to a α-eneral desire for such a movement. The Premier stated that only railways at present contracted for could be completed, as there would not be sufficient funds at the disposal of the colony to enable them to enter upon fresh contracts. At the same time, during the recess, Government would consider how best to raise money to carry on further works. Our correspondent tells us that Mr. lleynolds threatens a factious opposition. We can quite believe this of Mr. Keynolds. We never had much of an opinion of him, and now since he is nettled at the announcement that his separation resolutions will be met with no sympathy, he is prepared to obstruct the whole business of the colony. Happily, we believe that Mr. Keynolds will have to execute his war-dance alone. Perhaps he and Mr. Macandrew may appear in the Separation Ballet in a pas de deux. Our telegrams furnish a complete summary of the course marked out by Ministers. _ The session is expected to terminate in a month.

A LITTLE TAMMANY BING. In another column will be fonnd a report from the City Council, which purports to be that of Mr. Way mouth, and which, we are informed, the Council directed to be printed for general information. We are much mistaken, however, if the ratepayers will be satisfied with the information given in this paper, while the real report relating to the city accounts lies perdu in the drawer of the city officiils. .Next, in our opinion, to the impropriety of withholding information at all from the ratepayers of the actual state of affairs, is this fragmentary document. We will take the liberty to inform the Mayor and Council what it is that the ratepayers desire to know. But first, we may be excused, it' we state the kind of knowledge that they are not desirous just at this moment to obtain. They do not ask how the city accounts shall be kept in future, whether by double entry or by single, whether the columns for details should be three or four, or whether the duties of the officers should be more equally distributed. The public anxiety takes a different direction. The true report goes as far back as 1865, when the arrears of rates may be stated in round numbers at £1830. On the third of June, 1868, the large sum of £3615 12s 4d arrears, estimated as irrecoverable, was written off the city accounts. On the 23rd of May, 1871, the amount of arrears was £10,165 ISa lid. From this, perhaps, should be deducted the sum written off—if it was written off. The question arises how could these large sums have become arrears without some detailed statement published from time to time ? And how could such large arrears have been permitted to accumulate at all ? Surely we are not wrong in supposing that it is properties and not individuals that are to be taxed. Rates are summarily recoverable in all cases, even in those of absentees. It has been no unusual thing to see ratepayers summoned at the Police Court for arrears of rates. Why have not all ratepayers in arrears been served alike in this respect? But the authority for the remission in 1868 is not to be iound. Who did it, and by what right? Such arbitrary and unwarrantable proceedings means simply that those who do pay their rate 3 must pay twice over in order that certain persons who have been in arrears may go scot free. There had been two attempts made to obtain a detailed statement of the accounts, including these arrears : first, August sth, 1867 ; and second, December 19 th of the same year. The motions upon which these directions were given cannot be found. On the 17th of February, 1868, Mr. Greeuaway succeeded in passing a motion directing Mr. Keetley, then a member of the Board, to have prepared a detailed statement of the position of the rate account. This report was prepared accordingly and laid on the table on the 27th April, 1868. Strange to say, the report cannot be found. On the 16th of March, 1869, it was moved and carried, " That a sub-commit-tee be appointed to inquire into the arrears due on account of rates, the committee to consist of Messrs. Eeetley, Harris and the mover." This report cannot be found. On the Ist of February, 1869, a committee was appointed to investigate the list of defaulting ratepayers." It is not easy to see the necessity for this committee, if only five months before £3615 had been written off by the authority of the Board. Can anyone deny that these facts reveal a most impenetrable mess. We do not enumerate this catalogue of blundering for the purpose of casting blame upon any officer of the Council or the Board. But we do aver that the withholding precise and authoritative information of these facts is inexcusable. The reason given for postponing it till after the City elections would, if we were disposed to be uncharitable, point to a much less excusable motive for concealing it thau we are disposed to imagine or to allege. Wo are of opinion that the accounts of the city should be published quarterly; that any attempt to postpone or conceal them should be visited with instant condemnation. We have indicated enough to show ihat city affairs have fallen under the administration of an extremely close borough indeed, and we little understand the fealing of the ratepayers if they will not insist that tho Corporation shall open their mouths to explain, as well as their hands to deliver up the information whioh has been most improperly withheld.

We are glad to see that a movement is on foot to get up a subscription for the bereaved family of the latJ Mr. Milne, chief mate of the ship City of Auckland, who was unfor-

tunately drowned on the passage out of tliab vessel. Mr. Milne had been for three years mate of the vessel, and was well known and respected in Auckland. Subscription lists are open on board the ship City of Auckland, and at the various newspaper offices.

The management of the Young Men's Christian Association notify in our advertising columns another addition of some 75 volumes to the library of the Institution. The regular supply of new books is having a very marked effect upon the subscribers' list, which is beiug increased every week.

The members of the Prince of Wales Lodge of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons, held under the constitution of the Grand Lodge of England, celebrated their first annual meeting on Thursday evening, in the Lodge-room, at the Masonic Hotel, Princes-street, when Bro. W. H. Kiesling, late 3.W., who had been unanimously elected W. M. at the last meeting, was dnly installed in the Master's chair by Brother Jankins, P.M. of Lodge 209, and secretary of the Ara Lodge, assisted by Bro. Leers, P.M., 942, as director of ceremonies. They were assisted by the Board of Installed Clusters, which -was duly opened in ancienS form, by Brothers Wade, Hayward, Diethelm, Russell, Buchanan, and Doull. Bro. Kissling then appointed and invested hia officers as follows :—Bro. Diethelm, 1.P.M.; Bro. Ibbetson, S.W. ; Bro. Livingstone, J.W. ; Bro. Cowan, S.D. ; Bro. Seeley, J.D.; Bro. Whitehead, I.Gr.; Bro. Leers, P.M., was elected Treasurer, aud Bro. Porter, Tyler. The brethren and the visitors present subsequently sat down to a banquet, aerred up in his usual excellent manner by Bro. Avey, when the usual toasts on such occasions were drank.

The panorama of the Sunday-school Union, representing scenes in the Holy Land, yraa exhibited to tho schools connected with the Union in Onehunga, at the Institute of that place, on Thursday evening last. The Her. T. Hamer occupied tho chair, and opened the proceedings with prayer, after which he introduced Mr. Barton to deliver the descriptive lecture. There wus a very large attendance of children and adults, over 400 being present. There was very great attention throughout the meeting, the views and lecture being highly appreciated.

The Central Board of Education held their monthly meeting yesterday. The report of the examination of the Teachers' Committee was brought up, and showed that only six out of some fifteen persons who came up for examination were considered eligible for the Board's certificates. Other matters of importance were also dealt with, a full report of which appears in another portion of this issue.

The list of subjects in whioh candidates for University scholarships will be examined in 1873, appears in the last General Government Gazette.

The Queen's -assent to the Aot to Enable Provincial LegieUlurei to make Law» affecting Public Koade aud Watercourses hae been gazetted.

From our Australian telegrams we notice that the a.a. Hero left Melbourne for this port via Sydney on the 3rd instant. She would arrive this morning.

By the steamers Phoebe and St. Kilda, which arrived in the Manukau yesterday, we Lave received late Southern exchanges, extracts from which will be found elsewhere.

The Post-office Savings Bank returns for the quarter ending 30th June, ehow a total of deposits amounting to £104,976, and withdrawals £73,893, the balance left in denrnif being £31,082. V

A General Government Gazette of Sept. 4 contains a very interesting report on the chief features of the vegetation and agricultural capabilities of the district between Alaketu and Lake Taupo, by Mr. Thos. Kirk, P.L.S.

The tenders for one hundred shares in the Auckland Ga9 Company (Limited) were opened at noon yesterday. The prices offered were from £7 10* to £9 153, and the offer of £9 153 was accepted.

Mr. Thomas Miicffarlane has been appointed Deputy Provincial Auditor, in the place of Mr. Wm. Powditch, deceased.

The Rev. Mr. Turner, recently from Eng. land, will preach in the High-street Wealeyaa Chapel to-morrow forenoon.

Two samples of !N"ew Zealand freestone, from Oamaru and Kakanui, liars been sent to Victoria, and, amongst others, are being subjected to analysis, as to their fitness for use in building the new vice-regal residence in Melbourne.

The Christchureh. HeatUcote Boating Club intend to compete at the Inter-Prorincial Regatta, and have ordered a new boat from Salter, of Oxford, for the occasion.

A Cabman's Protection Society is bein» formed in Christchureh. We were always of opinion that it was the public wlio required protection, bub things aro very topsy-turrcy at the Antipodes.

The ordinary weekly sitting of the Resident Magistrate's Court was held yesterday, before Thomas Beckhiuu, Esq., R.M. There were but few cases set down for hearing, three of wl-ich were, however, defended. They cont'med, however, no features of public interest.

A circular from the General Posi-oDlce announces that in future the postage on correspondence posted in JTew Zealand for the west coast of South America, and for the British West Indies, will be as followe : West Coast of South America.—Letters: Not exceeding ioz., Is 6d ; every additional £oz., or fraction of »oz, Is 6d. ; newspapers: not exceeding 4ozs., each 3d; book packeti: not exceeding 4soza., 9d ; nob exceeding Sozs., Is 6d; every additional Bozs., or fraction of Bozs., la 6d. British West Indies. —Letters: Not exceeding ioz., Is td ; every addition ,, .! ioz., or fraction of goz., Is 4d ; newspapers : uot exceeding 4ozs., each 3d; book packets: not exceeding 4ozs., 9d ; not exceeding Sozs , Is Gd ; every additional Boza., or fraction of 80z3., Iβ 6d.

An instructive lecture was given in connection with the Sunday-School Union, at tie. school-room adjoining the Wellesley-street chapel, on Thursday evening, by the Her. W. Jouo3, on " Head and Heart, or True Culture." He deprecated miscellaneous and incidental reading, which had no higher object than passing awsy an idle hour. A few choice books thoroughly read and digested, would bo of infinitely greater service. 'ihe study of history he especially commended as one of the moat interesting and ueeful towhich young men could devote their leisure time. Mr. G-lanville proposed a vote of thanks, which whs curried by acclamation. There was an excellent attendance on the occasion.

The Advertiser says :—" Air. Moorhouse, the well-known ex-Superintendent of Canterbury, is endeavouring to enter the political arena again, and has resigned a comfortable official position with £800 a-year attached to it, to content the seat for Mount Eginont, rendered vacant by the retirement of Mr. GHsborne. Mr. Moorhouse organised and brought into shape and good working order the Land Transfer Department, and his duties in the future would probably have been light compared with those of the past, but the love of public life is too strongly implanted in him to be resisted, and he is ready to go into the Houso of Representatives on the first favourable opportunity. The country generally would, no doubt, be glad to welcome back to public life an old aud experienced politician ,- but we hope to see Mr. Moorhouse rejeoted on thia occasion, as he has been put forward by the Opposition, and because his return would ouly embarrass the new Ministry. Mr. Atkinson, formerly Defenco Minister, is the other caiididato for the vacant seat, and as he has some local influenco in the province of Taranaki, should stand a fair chance of being returned. He would undoubtedly suppoi* the Stafford Government, and would be a source of strength to them." We learn that amongst the passengers by ihe Alexandra on Wednesday, for Sydney, was Dr. Sam. Wo are sure that many in the community will regret to hear of Dr. Sam's departure, &•.' he had good qualities in his disposition, and was, iu many cases, kind and attentive to poor people who could uot afford to pay him the regular fees for medical attendance. We have never been able t) agree with him iu the part, he took in political matters, and, indeed, we believe that his interesting himself in theee ruattera at all was a mistake. We hear that Dr. Sa-n hus left his resignation of the seat he held iu the Provincial Council in the hands of Mr. Butt, to be brought out when he shall consider expedient. This is most unquestionably wrong. The seat in the iVovlccial Council was a trust which Dr. Sam was bound to resign into the hands of his constituents whenever lie found that he could no longer discharge his duties — Advertiser, September 13. A project is on foot amongst the ladies of Parawai to raise funds for the erection and support of a school in that district, ilrs. Mackay, and other ladies, are preparing u. Christmas tree, which will bo on view at the Academy of Mueic.— lbid. A partly petrified boue, which won'd seem to' that of a rib of a

whale (being curved and about three feet in length), was left at our office this day by Mr. J. C. Young. It appears that Home men were employed by him in digging a drain in his yard, and at a di-plh of about three feet, came upon this curiosity. It can be seen at our office by any person interested, and, following upon the discovery of the largebone on the Bright Smile Company's may furnish matter for icientifio research ana inquiry.— lbid. We take the following amusing paragraph froQi the Westport Times :—" The designation, of the Westport Post-office should be altered to that of the General Postal and Piggorj Department. Swine of all sizes, colours, and conditions, have taken up thoir nightly babimtion in the delivery lobby, without let or hindrance, leaving then) throughout the day umistakeable visible and olfactory symptoms of their presence. On a recent moonlight evening we counted a full score of pigs, large and email, snugly coiled up underneath we letter-boxes, and it was impossible to either post a letter or open a private box, without Bret routing the enemy, who resisted the intrusion with proverbial obstinacy. The-ost-master should make a raid, aud confiscate ft few of the little ones. Boast pig on the disn should hove a agreeable perfume than live pig in the lobby."

The Otago Times, of the 31st ult., contains the following paragraph :—The Wellington Independent, in a leading article, speaks ot "Sir Geoffery Hudeon—we beg his pardon, His Honor Mr. Curtie." Sir Geoffery Hudson, as readers of Sir "Walter Scott's " Peveril ol the Peak" will be aware, was a dwarf, and M.r. Curtie, though much taller than air Geoffery, ie a gentleman of email stature. This sneer • * * * «*"• with particularly had grace, moreover, from turn Independent, which in the very same cohimjJaccuses the Fast of blackguardism. « *?" Indepenient can find no other fault with atx. Curtie, that geutleman may congratulate himself; for in the opinion of all rigWthinking persons the vulgar sneer ol tu Independtnt will only recoil upon that journal-

Wβ (Post) understand that Mr. John White lir.s forwarded to-day the following telegram: —"Wellington, 9tb September, 1872.—10 the Editor Star, Grejinouth.—Permit me to salute those fervid enthusiasts whose burnin* zeal found congenial employment in consigning my effisry to the flames; and to cxpree! n.y regret that I was denied the graNation li beitg present in propria Maj the incense from th«, burnt offering eweeten the sacrificial instincts of my annibilatore; but let me remind them Though I Have been extinsjiisliea, yet tliere rise, A thousand beacons from the spark I bore. —John White." It may be as well to state that the aulo-da-fo-ists are noC Mr. White a constituents.

The now famous "Maids of Dundee appear to be finding imitators in Australia. The Newcastle Chronicle of the 9th August savß ._« Yesterday afternoon, at the hour ap-pointed-4o'clock,-a large number of persons of the gentler sex assembled on the Hill, no doubt for the purpoi* of taking a part in the announced strike amongst tne maidservants. The gentleman who was announced to preeide ■was not present, and no one having courago enough to occupy the vacant stand, the meeting lapsed."

The Melbourne Argus, of the 28th ultimo, ga y a: "Members of Parliament eeem at last to be awakening to the importance of the Fourth Estate, "'i'lio Press is being severely patronised. Laet night Mr. W. C. Smith gave notice that, he would ask the Chief Secretary whether he would make inquiries Tvith a view that nil post, telegraph, and other public notices which the Press has hitherto courteously printed -without payment, shall for the future be paid for as Government advertisements at current rates, and that provision be made on the additional estimates for 1872-73 for this purpose ; and later in the evening the Chief Secretary told Mr. "\V. Clarke that the Government were taking into consideration the propriety of subsidising direct telegraphic communication ■with India aud the East."

We (Post), learn that the firm of Brogden and Sons are about undertaking some large contracts in Holland. One is the reclamation of the Wieringer Late, situated at the northern part of the Zuideer Zee, between the islaud of Wieringer and the town of ATodemblik. The reclamation will comprise 48,000 acres, leavins, after deducting for roads, dykes, acd bridges, 44,000 acres of land available for cultivation. Another is a projected railway to establish the union of the Northern and Southern State railways in the Netherlands by a line through the provinces of North Brabant and Guelderland, which junction line is to form a link of a great international chain, connecting the north-west of France, "West Belgium, East Netherlands, and north-west Germany. It is also proposed to connect with England by a line of daily steamers between Flissingue and Harwich. From what is said in Enalish papers as to this line, it will soon become a favorite with travellers between England and Germany, as the passage by water will not be so rough, and it will shorten the time between London and Berlin fourteen hours.

We (PcstJ learn on good authority that Mr. Fox will shortly retire altogether from political life. A meeting of members of the new Opposition w:is held yesterday, when Mr. Foi, judiciously making a virtue of necessity, resigned the leadership of his party, who henceforth own allegiance to Mr. Vogel as their political chief. This step is only preparatory to Mr. Fox's complete retirement from the political arena. And it is indeed a wise step.

In his defence speech, Mr. Orinond claimed credit for various mythical works which have as much foundation in truth as Peter Wilkins' Flying Bride, or the apparition of Mrs. Veal. Niagara has been bridged, the "herring-pond" is to have its underground railway, but Mr. Orinond is a greater genius than the man who carried out the former, or than he who ronceived the latter undertaking. If we may believe —it is generally difficult —what we read iu the Independent, Mr. Ormond asserted that the Government had "opened up the country beween Wanganui and Picton." Had they ? Scorning the narrow bounds of space, they had opened up—the ocean ! The vast illimitable treasures supposed to underlie the deep are now available to the settlers of New ZeaUnd. The "patient sons" of Holland, with their dykes, are outdone, and Canute may hide bis diminished head for ever. — Post. That spirited little journal, the Dunedin Echo, says: —"Wβ had the honor of having our publication denounced by the Rev. Mr. Sutherland from the pulpit of the First Church, lust Sunday. We regret to btate that this was during his farewell sermon, as he has been called hy Providence to a bigger church, and a better salary, in Sydney. The loss is ours, not his." A special general meeting of the New Zealand Agricultural Society will take place on Tuesday afternoon next. A call of sixpence per share has been made in the New Rakaia Gold Mining Company. A call of one ehilling per share has been made in the Nil Desperandum Gold Mining Company.

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Bibliographic details

PARLIAMENTARY., New Zealand Herald, Volume IX, Issue 2693, 14 September 1872

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3,852

PARLIAMENTARY. New Zealand Herald, Volume IX, Issue 2693, 14 September 1872

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