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FRANKLYN ELECTION.

NOMINATION AT PANMURE. Tsa nomination of candidates to represent tho electoral district of Franklyn, in the room of Mr. Boberfc Graham (resigned) took place yesterday at the Panmure Bridge Toll Gate, at the hour of noon. Punctually at 12 o'clock the returning officer, J. J. Symonds, Esq., airived, and addressing the electors B aid, Gentlemen, I havo to inform you thav I oonrened this meeting by virtue of a Excellency the Governor (and which I w 'l !B k°rtly read to you), to H ive the electors of Franklyn an opportunity of electing a duly qualified Pron to fill the seat vacated by the resignation of .Robert Graham, Esq., in the Houso of Kepreientativos for the electoral district of Franklyn. I need scarcely add that I hope the proposers, seconders, and candidates may obtain an impartial hearing. (He then read the writ, and concluded by saying.) I leavo you gentlemen to proceed with the nomination. Mr. McLean said ho came before the electors to nominate a legally qualified candidate, to represent the elootoral district of Franklyn in the House ot Bepresentativee. Mr. Buckland had long served the country settlers, both in the Provincial Council, and also in the General Assembly of Now Zealand, and thoy knew his qualifications. Mr. Buckland, for a number of years, had been a leading Inember of the province, was well known in tho Otahuhu district, and was a large settler in the Franklyn district. Ho was well acquainted with the VV aikato, having farms beth at Cambridge and Hamilton. Noman had a greater interest in the Tauranga district, and no man better knew the wants of the country than did Mr. Buckland. No man had dono more to develop tha gold-fields. For these reasons, and knowing how well ho had performed his duties on Erevious cocaßions, both in tho General Assembly and 1 the Prorinoial Council, thoy could not, as country settlers, return a better man. If it had been possible that any country settler tad been put in nomination against him, they might havo had a split amongst tha country settlers, but when a stranger, like Mr. Swan, came before them, they wanted farther qualifications than he oould show. If it had been a man like Mr. Martyn they might have split their votes. In the present case, however, the settlers of that district must tink their petty differences and their ■Vestry disputes, and return a man who was intimately bound up with the interests of the district of Franklyn. He could not help thinking that th« Gold-fields Committee had taken a great deal on themsolves in nominating a man in opposition to a well-known old settler like Mr. Buckland. What had they to do with miner's rights, or the export duty on gold. What had they to do with a requisition signed by miners and holders of publican'B licenses. Not but what it was proper that the gold-fieldi should be represented, but they should not now attempt to disfranchise the district, by meeting at Butt's hotel and nominating a candidate who bad no interest in the agricultural portion of the district. It was a thing that ought not to be admitted, and he hoped the residents of the Thames would strenuously oppose it. With regard to Mr. Swan, he should have waited until the place was legally qualified to return a member. They all knew it was necessary that the gold-fields should be represented. Last session it was mooted that the district of Tauranga should have a member as well as the Fast Coast, but now they would stultify themselves if they returned a person nominated by the gold-fields alone. Why, if they returned such a person as Mr. Swan, hew could he ask for the rights for the gold-field, when n doing so he would be asking for his own individual rights. He woHld be looked on not as a member for the Franklyn district but as the representative •the gold-fields. On these considerations he had gTOat pleasure in proposing Mr. William Buckland as a fit and proper person to represent the electoral district of Franklyn in the General Assembly. Mr. Fakmbr seconded tho nomination of Mr. Buckland, and said after the able speech of Mr. McLean, he need not Bay anything in addition. Mr. Buckland was thoroughly known as an independent man and an old settler, and had served them faithfully, both in the General Assembly and Provincial Council. He had great pleasure in seconding the nomination of Mr. William Buckland.

Mr, H. 8. AKDkewb came forward and said he had great pleasure iu proposing Mr. William Turnbull Swan as a fit and proper person to *be put in. nomination to represent the electoral district of Franklyn. In replying to the remarks of the gentleman who •proposed Mr, Buckland, he must Bay that he agreed : ;vith all the enconiums ho had passed on Mr. Buckland. He esteemed him as a settler, and had never done otherwise, but politically, and as tlieir|representative for Franklyn, he waß behind the age. He wanted, -with many of his fellow electors, a marked, a decided, change. The mover of tho proposition to elect Mr. Buckland had named Mr. Swan as a stranger amongst them, and his being brought forward as a piece of presumption on the part of the gold-miners —that they were stultifying themselves by bringing a person forward to represent them. It would be in the General Assembly that the battle of their interests would have to bo fought. The old settlers had been their legislators up to the present moment, and what had been the consequence ? Why, the country was on the very verge of insolvency, and likely to pass through the bankruptcy court. They wanted new blood in their legislators—men with good and staunch principles. The outline Mr. Buckland had given them of his line of politics, both in his address to the electors, and. in his speech at Papakura, a week ago, was eo meagre that they did not touch on any of the points which the electors wished to have eliminated in the Assembly. If they had local governments nominated by tho Assembly, in which they were told Auckland ■was in the minority, and always outvoted, what hope had they ?—how could they keep the Northern Island intact ? The political policy of Mr. Buckland ■was the absence of all policy in politics; he had not said a word in his address, or his speech at Papakura, that told him he was going in entirely for the success Of the Northern Island. On the question of Separation Mr. Buckland had told them publicly that ho ■was not an out-and-out supporter of Separation. He told them that when lie vsted for Separation he was in. a passion, and that when he got cool he was sorry for having done so, and wa,3 ready to go over to the Tanks of the Wellington Confederacy. (Hear, hear.) The whole Government of the Assembly, while thoy •w ere in the minority, was no Government of theirs. Provincial Government had hitherto done much good, but the time for that was now over. They wanted a Central Government for the Northern Island, and from that central Government the counties should radiate. And if Mr. -Swan would give his political policy on that subject, he (Mr. Andrews) had 110 doubt that he would be returned to represent them in the Assembly, however young or unknown he might be. It was all very well to say " You are a young settler," but he would lika to know how long a man required to live in Auckland before he knew the wants of the Northern Island ? He had known Mr. Swan for above thirty years of his life. He knew him to be the son of an esteemed minister of the Gospel, and that he was intuitively a politician. He was also a thoroughly educated man, and since lie had been in BTew Zealand he had gone through the fire in his endeavour to open up the forest) and knew the difficulties to be encountered. It was, therefore, a new doctrine to him to say he was not an old enough settler, unless they could tell him how long ifc would take to properly educate a man politically. He nominated Mr, Swan, because he knew him to be politically honeßt, and had always conducted himßelf with honesty, and fidelity in the positions in which he had been placed. Although comparatively unknown he now came forward to be better knovm in the future. There must be a beginning'at aome time, or none of them would be known. If he IT6B not a long resident or an old Bettler that ■was no reason ha should be despised, or else who would come to the Bhores of Now Zealand. The new settlers expecting that the old residents would receive them with open arms, and be glad of their arrival, but if they were to be told that because they had been only a few years in the colony and were therefore unknown, and consequently politically incorrect, then the sooner they sent word to England and other places to stop people coming out, tho better. "When people carae to New Zealand they came with brains and intelligence, and those brains and intelligence would soon lead them to understand the difficulties of settlers in making this the home of them'gelvea and their children. Prom a thirty years' knowledge of Mr. Swan—knowing that ho was an •educated man—knowing that he was a politician—he proposed him with the greatest amount of pleasure and confidence that he would be the proper man to be the representative for Franklyn. Mr. D. K. Geabkson said he was not aware until a few moments previously that the duty and the pleasure of seconding the nomination of Mr. Swan would be allotted to him. After tho able speech of the proposer, it would not bo for him to make any lengthy

remarks. There was none among those present who could appreciate more fully than he did tho services of the " Old Identity," but ho believed that, like a piece of ordnance worn out in the defense of the country, which was only fit to be placed alongside tho town pump as a murk of publio curiosity, bo these " Old Identities" were protty well worn out, and they wanted an infusion of new blood to tako an intorest in their legislation. He had great pleasuro in seconding the nomination of Willniui Swan as a, fit and proper person to represent the electoral district of Franklyn in the Genoral Assembly. . ~ There being no other candidate proposed, Mr. Bucklakd camo forward and Baid—ln coining before them as a candidate to represent tho district of Franklyn in tho Geneueral Assembly, it would he necessary to tell them why ho came before them unasked. In most constitutional governments thoro was a party government mixed up with it, that is to say thoro wero two sots of principles, one belonging to the " ins," and another to the " outs," and most, if not all politicians wero members of either one party or the other. With New Zealand at present this was not the case. There was no party government, although they had a constitutional government. Until they got partv government constitutional government would nover bo carried out in its extonded sense. For those reasons he camo forward unasked. At home the cry was " measures not men." Thoro were 110 measures out lioro, consequently it was " men, not measures.ln coming before them simply as a settler, he had only to call their attention to tho fact of his being in tho country before any of thoso then prosant. lie was known to them all, and his political career had been before them from before the foundation of tho colony. That alono gave him the right to suppose that ho was at least eligible. Believing that he was eligible ho put tho return of the candidate in their hands, believing that if they returned him they paid him a greater compliment than if ho was the nominated member of a party. It would bo a mark of respect paid to him individually, and not for tho political creed ho professed. For these reasons he had refused to canvass for votes, and had not put himself under any obligation to any of electors; the honor was a groat one, but he was too diffident to canvass on hi* own personal merits. Should thoy roturn him, lie would consider it one of tho greatest honors that could bo bestowed on any one, that of making laws that would effect not only themselves but their children. His political opinions had been before them for a numb«r of years. Ha had no sympathy with thoso gentlemen who went in for at once broaking up and abolishing the present stato of things. There wtis no doubt that a change was necessary, but violent changcs were the worst things that could happen to a country whether new or old. They must first be educated for that change. To break up the country now would be a suicidal act. Thoy wished now to build up institutions similar to those that had been established in England for the last thousand yeartf. Xhero would, however, be a nocessity for years to come for some persons to administer tho provincial trust funds. They would always require a body of some kind for that purpose. There wero tho Grammar-school funds, tho Asylum fund, tho Hospital fund, the Harbour Trust funds, in fact any number of funds, and. tho province must have a voice in their administration. Thoro certainly was no necessity for having an expensive staff of officials, but the funds must bs administered. _ They must therefore remain intact as a province, if thoy wished to derive any benefit from the institutions he had alluded to. Supposing Mr. Swan and he "were both returned they might both vote the same way on every question. Tho only thing on which he disagreed with Mr. Swan was hia attempt to make the peoplo of the Thames believe that their interests were separate from that of the province. Tho interest of the Thames was the interest of the province, and the interest of the province was the interest of the Thames. If one succeeded the othor would succeed, and if tho ono went down so would the other. It was Auckland money which had fostered that field, and if the Auckland merchants acquired more money that money would bo spent there, and on othor portions of tho province. If they elected him, he would sorvo them to tho best of his ability. In his opinion it was useless to go down and say you would voto for this or that mattor. Party government meant that a number of men should sink their petty differences for one great whole. Whoever went down was but ono item in his party. It was useless for him to say ho would vote for this or tho other, because he would bo obliged to connect himself with a party, and that party would bo tho one which had in his opinion the best interests of the provinoe at heart. Thoro was one thing ho would mention with reference to the gold-fieldß—namely, tho reduction of the duty on gold. At present, as they wero all probably awaro, there was a sum of 2s. 6d. per ounce paid on all gold exported out of tho colony, irrespective of its value. At the present time the lowest standard gold paid as heavy a duty as gold of the highest standard. That fell heavily on tho Thames miners, in consequence of the gold there being of an inferior quality to that obtained on the West Coast. Mr. Stafford had pledged himself, howevor, to bring in a bill to fix tho standard value, and their duty would bo paid according to that. So far that was a Bettled matter, and ho would vote for it, as it carried with it common oonße and honesty. With regard to tho general principles of taxation, ho had already stated to them at a former public meeting they might alter tho system of taxation, bnt not the amount. They had a certain amount to pay to meet existing liabilities, and that mnst be obtained in somo manner. Tho Genoral Government would find as much as it could do to meet its engagements. All their internal improvements mast bo dono by themselves, assisted by locil revenues. But outside these local revenues thoy should bo prepared to tax themielves for their own immediate government. Ho had bcon twitted with being one of the old identities, agisting in borrowing tho money which was now pressing so heavily on them. As far os his humble voice went he did all In his power to prnvont its being borrowed. Not being ablo to prevent it, should be no reason that he should bo accused of imposing the burdens. If there was any other subject on which tho electors would wish to question him he would be glad to answer them.

Mr. H, 3. Andbews asked Mr. Buckland if lie was in favor of an income and property tax.

Mr. Bttoxland said —He was not. He did not see that it was necessary at the present time ; thoro was a necessity for raising monoy to support tho Hospital and the Asylum, moro particularly. There wore at present no funds to keep them going and yet they must bo kept going, and funds must bo found" to keep theße institutions in a creditable state, inasmuch as these institutions were principally used by the laboring classes, it would bo no hardship to impose a poll tax of ton shillings a-head. He did not know any fairer plan than that all adults should pay ten shillings for this purpose. Tho money would bo easily collected. The cost of protecting a proporty tax would amount to as much as that spent on the institution, and the great object of taxing Wflfl to incur as little expense as possible. Mr. H. S. Andbews—ln putting on this poll-tax would you allow it to go through the Government Treasury to be spent on officials. Mr. BucKLAND said—Certainly not. The tax should be inviolate. There should be a trust appointed and the money paid immediately to the trust. Mr. W. Kerb asked if either Mr. BucMand or Mr. Swan were prepared to vote for a Bill of tho nature of a Permissive Liquor Selling Bill. Mr. said he had an amendment to propose to that—that the question be put on tho morning of the millenium. Mr. BuosXiAND said no man could be moro awaie of the vast amount of evil arising from intoxicating liquors than he was, but he was fully satisfied of tho inutility of such laws as this. If the majority of the people expressed an opinion on this subject they would require no legislation. To interfere -with this matter would be simply futile. If he thought a law of that kind would have a beneficial effect in one single instance, he would rote for it. It was something of the same nature as tho'Maino Liquor Law, and they knew how it acted in the State of Maine. Instead of having public houses they got private sinks of drinking. Sucli a law, he was persuaded, would not have the effect desired. While, therefore, he agreed with Mr. Kerr as to the desirability of tho end to be gained, he did not think that was the way to attain it. Mr. Keee : Then we are to understand that you will not vote for it ? Mr. Buokxahd • No ; I will not. Mr. Fhieb : No ; nor any sensible man. Mr. Bwan said he appeared before the electors an unknown man, but the ignorance of Mr. Maolea i with reßpect to him did not rendor him unfit to fil the post which ho sought to occupy. Ia tho district of Frunklyn a largo community had recently grown up having peculiar want», which must be satisfied,

and that quiokly. (Hear, hear.) That community had the power to send a man to the Assembly—one who would mako the wants of that community his speciality. He avowed himsolf as tho propounder and promoter of those special intorests of tho Thames gold-fie'ds, not that' they were antagonistic to tho agricultural interests. (Question.) That was the question that Mr. Maclean was going upon—that it was presumptuous in the Thames gold-field to attemot to bo represented.

Mr. E. Maclean : Oh no. I said it was presumptuous to disfranchiso this district and place in a man from tho Thames gold-field.

Mr. Swah had yet to learn that a clear majority of any district had not a right to send a requisition to a man who might be comparatively unknown to another part of the district. He held the signatures of a clear majority of the electors of Franklyn in his hand. There wore no antagonistic principles between them. The intorests of the pold-ficlds were tho interests of the farmers, far the more diggers they had the greater would bo tho consumption of their produce. Twenty thousand diggerß wero far better than twenty thousand soldiers, although tho lattor might be backcd with fat commissariat contracts. Ho (Mr. Swan) contendod forjhis right. Ho had been draggod out from his retirement. Ho, therefore, now stood upon hia right. It was true ho had no great experience of provincial politics, for they had been one thing ono day and another thing tho next. (Hear.) As far as tho question of local uolfGovernment went—tho question which whs then agitating the wholo community—ho had always been in favor of it in its entirety. If a district doserved the control of its own rovcnueß, it had no right to come upon the public revouue for its local matters. When you take away from tho Provincial Council the nocessity of voting supplies for out-districts, it was denuded of the greater part of it 9 functions. With respect to the Thames Gold-fields, it wanted not only local self-government but the control of its own revenue. Tho greater portion of the revenuo available for local improvement there wore the proceeds of miners' rights and gold dutieß. He believed thore had been £7000, paid for minors' rights, and all that had gone to the native landlord. Under certain Acts of the Colonial Legislature, certain revonues raised on the gold-field were made available for local improvements of that particular gold-field. But at present the Thamos gold-fields wore under the Provincial Government. Whon asked for local improvements, the Government said they had no monoy. The reply to that was "We have paid you money besides having provided a peculiar local rovenue." Tho Provincial Government says " we can do nothing for you." But thoy, the people, had nothing to do with the revenue not being put to its legitimate use. They had paid it. They were therefore going to as tho Genoral A sseinbly to giro them protection, so that they might havo tho control of their local revenue, and thoy wero perfectly warranted in doing so, oven if they wero taking advantage of the peculiar position in regard to Franklyn. With regard to taxation he (Mr. Swan) was distinctly opposod to any incroase of taxation in any shape whatever. He would stoadily oppose it. He would steadily support a roduotion in general expenditure. In order to make both ends meet they must do both. He entirely disputed the right of any old settler telling people who had been in the country only I seven years, that because they had not been here | twentv-five years, thoy were not, therefore, per ss- fit Ito fill the place. That was like the ark which nobody but priests and Levites were allowed to touch' Ho had said enough t:> show that ho entertainod tha notion that any man who was not a burdon to the public, and who was an honest man, had the undoubted right to represent any constituency in the colony. (Cheora.)

Mr. W. Kerb said he wishod Mr. Swan to answer tho question he had previously put to Mr. Buckland, with regard to tho permissive law. Mr. Freer: I press my amendment. Mr. Swan : I am of opinion without refsrance whatever to any trade, that the drinking customs of this country are a great ovil, but I am not aa a legislator preparod to remedy thoso ovila by contracting i the liberty to sell liquor. I will nlwajs advocate free trado. If any person makes a baaat of himself he can be punished at common law. But I do not see how this law you speak of ia to bo applisd, or how it can act beneficially. If you will show mo how to put an end to privato grog drinking and illicit distillation, then I will vote for any Pi'l that will act for the benefit of the country. l!u'. .':is permissive law will not act. Mr. Freer—What right have you to restrict ono from drinking twenty glasses of grog any day ? You might havo asked that question 500 years ago, but i won't do now. Mr. Kerb—You will find tho matter will come on you very quick. Mr. Bceats—This ia tho gentloman who charged eight penco a quart to the troops for milk during tho time of the war, and allowed Simpson to put up a rotten shanty on his land and then charged him rent for it. Dr. Sam : Will you pledgo yourself, Mr. Swon, to voto for financial separation of tho Thames goldfield ? Mr. Swan: Yes. A "Voice : Will you do tho best you can to get us roads for ourselves ? Mr. Swan : Such is my intontion. A show of handa waß now taken, when the Beturning Officer declared the show in favour of Mr. Swan, which announcement was received with cheers. Mr. Bucklakd demanded a poll. The Returning Officer said: A poll having been demanded by Mr. Buckland, I hereby givo notico that the polling will be taken on tho 2ud July next, commencing at nine o'clock, and closing at four. Mr. Swan proposed a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, which was seconded by Mr. Bucki,ani>. The Returning- Officer having replied, the meeting gave three cheors for Mr. Symonds, and then separated.

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Bibliographic details

New Zealand Herald, New Zealand Herald, Volume V, Issue 1435, 23 June 1868

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4,395

FRANKLYN ELECTION. New Zealand Herald, Volume V, Issue 1435, 23 June 1868

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