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DEATH OF COLONEL NIXON.

t. [t is with a feeling of the most, profound regret hat we have, this morning, to record the death jf Colonel Nixon, late Colonel of the Auckland VI ilitia, and Commander of the Colonial Defence Korce. The gallant deceased expired at his late residence, at Mangarei, yesterday morning at seven o'clock. Colonel JS ixon was severely, and, as it has proved to be, mortally wounded at liangiawaliia on the 21st February last, the bullet penetrating the chest and injuring the lungs. From time to time, hopes of his ultimate recovery were indulged, and the sufferer was conveyed from the front to Mangarei. The wound was kept open, but the patient continued to waste away until a month since a fatal termination lnul nearly ensued. With the closure ol the wound gaidirene set ill and death followed. Colonel Nixon adds another to the long and sorrowful list of British Chivalry the victims of an insensate and unprovoked rebel[lion. He arrived in Auckland some time in 11852 or 1K53, with the intention of proceeding South, a course from which he was dissuaded by the late Brigade-Major Greenwood, whose property, at Mangarei, (in conjunction with Col. Haultain) ho took on lease, proving himself as indefatigable and intelligent as a settler, as he had previously done as a soldier. When the Taranaki war of 1860 broke out, Colonel Nixon was invited to raise the Otahuhu Cavalry. The class and character of that corps, then and since, call for no eulogy from us. StiUice it that n finer or a braver body of men never took the field ; and none that placed more [implicit or well-merited reliance in their lamented chief. Colonel Nixon entered the army on the sth April 1831 as ensign of that renowned regt., the ;!t)th. which bears on its banners the distinguishing blazon " J 3 rim us in India, ' together with eleven others dating from " i'lassoy " to " Sevastopol." He was promoted to a Lieutenanc} on the 27tli March. 1833. Became Captain, l>j [ purchase, on the 28th December, 1838. lirevet

Major 30th April, 1844, and Iteginiental Major* on the 7th August, 1846. He served in the cx-S pedition against the Kajah ot Coorg iu 1834 aiul was- in the action of Maliarajpore on tbeE 2l)th December, 184-3, serving as .Brigade Majors to the otli brigade —his friend and companions |in arms, Colonel Haidtain, (then Lieut, audi [Adjutant B'Jth regiment) participating in the* I same action. 1 n Colonel Nixon, England hasj 'lost a brave and meritorious soldier, —New Zealand an able and energetic colonist, who was respected by all classes oi the community 'and beloved by all those who had the pleasure 'of intimacy with liini. ' _ | Colonel" jNixon was a member of the New 'Zealand Assembly for the District of Franklin, [but iluring the late session attended, we believe, but once at the sittings ot the House, being enjgaged on active duty at the iront, where the [value ol liis services were ol so distinguished a | character us to call fortli from the Government !a special acknowledgment. His loss to them in I the present emergency will be great. Deeply [as Colonel Nixon was valued as a soldier, it is [rather in his private character as a settler and [country gentleman that his memory will be Sinounicd with aiiectionate regard by the iu[habitants of this Province. As an active and [energetic settler, the chairman and promoter oi four agricultural associations, and other usetul '.institutions, Colonel JNixon was well known, and Ijthe kindly and atlable manner \\ itli which lie frnmde all those with whom he came m contact. tfeel at home with him rendered linn generally tbeloved. His loss will be deeply ieit. _ llie ollices will be closed at 10 o clock foil Monday. The interment takes place on iMondav next, and with all possible honour, Jjas will" be seen by the subjoined olhcial programme. „ , , L fa Militia, and Volunteer General Orders, 3 27th May, 18(34. 3 1. It is with deep regret that the Major-General to the colonial forces the death ol Co one SMavmaduke George Nixon, commanding Colonial llk-lonce Force and Koyal Cavalry \ olunteers, w c Itook place this morning, from a wound received m 1 notion on the 21st February last at Rangiawlna. By the death of Colonel Nixon the colonial forces lose the services of a most gallant ana chivalrous ollicer, and tho colony loses a noble gentleman and energetic settler. . , Tito remains of Colonel Nixon will he interred on Monday next, the 30th inst., at three o clock p.m. ■1. With reference to the above order a tiling paitj consisting of all the available men of the Ist and .ml Kclass Auckland Militia, Auckland lutle \ oliinteors land Auckland Naval Volunteers,- under the command |of Liout.-Col. Nation, will assemble at.two o dock lp.m. on Monday next, at the Albert Barrack,, frwithout their ball ammunition in their pouches, B when they will bo supplied with blank , 1 3. Captain Button, commanding the Ko) al Cas alrv I Volunteers, will tako steps to order the ditlercnt gtroops of the above corps to parade at tho same Una. I""! 'captain Hardington, commanding the Auckland irroop lioyal Cavalry Volunteers, wu. be pleased to fiturnish a guard over the remams ot Colonel Nixon, fat the Albert Barracks, from to-morrow at i p.m. Suntil the funeral takes place. fj 5. Any officersovmeuof tlioColonial Defence loici Ithat caii be spared from duty aro requested to attenc ithe funeral ol their late commanding ollicor. li iiy Order, Sfl H. C. Balkeavis, O JLt.-Col-, 31 Deputy Adjutant General of Militia ant 8? * Volunteers.

,1, ini iri'iMiiawn -*" <WHMWI»I*" POSTPONEMENT OF Mb. HaBDINGTON'eI LASD Sale.—in consequence ol llic death ot Colonel jSixon, whose funeral taking place ou .Monday Will cause a day of general mourning, the Onehunga land sale will not take plaee until luesBank of Auckland. —We perceive by advertisement that the project oi establishing a loan society has resulted in the formation ol a Banking Company under the title ot the -Bau of Auckland. The Capital is -fixed at £100,000, in 10,000 shares of £10 each, with power to increase. The Provisional Directors are Messrs. 'James O'jNeill, David Nathan, K King, and \(} jVlaurice O'Korke. Further particulars will be seen by reference to our advertising columns.

HotiBEKY fKOM THE PEBSOH Wrr*r Violence.—Yesterday evening about six o'clock, as Sergeant ltylund, of the Auckland Cavalry Volunteers, was engaged at the top of Mr. Hardington's yard, he heard two m®ncoining up the yard, one of whom said to the other, " Why are you following me here? must be wanting to rob me or injure me, and if you do not go away I will call the police and give you iu charge." He then heard a heavy blow struck, and the sound as of a nitui falling !to the ground. He as quickly as possible then, came round to the spot, and found a man lying insensible on the ground, while a tall stout fellow stood over him, with his hand in the pocket of the one upon the ground. When con[fronted the fellow jumped up, and, eluding the Igrasp of the sergeant, ran down the yard, the ilatter following and calling " Stop thief!" A Ipoliceman standing by in the street seemed not jto understand what to do, and though followed by Sergeant liyland half-way up Victoria-street 'the ruliian got clear away. Anatomical Museum.—We axe glad to see that this interesting exhibition, which we expected would have closed before _ this, is announced for another week. This will give a further opportunity to those who have not already seen it, to study the complex machinery which is requisite to the existence ol man. IS ewtok Chapel Sunday School. —Amongst the advertisements will be found an announcement that on Sunday next, May 29th, two sermons will be preached on behalf ol the Sun-' day School in connection with the Newton Chapel. The sermons will be preached by the .Kev. J. Long. . The ISelson Gold-field—The Otago Witness publishes the following letter from a digger tiieu at the new rush on the West Coast goldtteld :—" Matatakia .Kiver, April 19th. JJear friend, I hasten to inform you of my arrival oa this river. We got up four days ago, and lam sorry to say the news is not very cheering, that madman who wrote the letter to Fox's for us to come is worked out, at least the gold is running out, for he has given up his claim. The river is as large as the Manuherikia, and has been worked this nine months; there is a population of about 100 miners ; some of them that call bring the water on their claims to sluice, are making £1 per day, but it is only very few places where the water is to be got. The creeks are all taken up, and the dirt is that poor it won't pay more than tucker to cradle —gold very tine and scaley. They don't work on the main S bottom. -No quartz scarcely to be seen; the wash is sandstone with hard granite reef. Bad place lor provisions. Horses cannot pack within

20 ruiles of the diggings, so we have to caiTy our tucker through thick scrubby bush, the provisions are carted from ]S* elson to the Slips, 5U miles good road, and then packed to the junction ol the liuller and Mangles Kivers, 30 miles, but there are no consumers. I am tola fifteen pack horses supply this district, and. the rainy season sets in about Ist ol May, when most of the claims will be swamped and the people leaving. lam sorry I came, but hope to bo able to get back in a few weeks, dliould anything break out I will let you know, but I don't like the look of the place, no reefs shewing ;at all, but there are a good few prospecting the different rivers. In haste. I will conclude with best wishes, hoping you are well, I remain, yours truly, George . Hides. . I Tendebs. —"We perceive that works ol mi* provement are not at a standstill in Auckland, "and that lurther tenders are required by both | Mr. Wrigley and Mr. teals—by the former for I the erection of a warehouse in Queen-street, I and excavations in Shortland-street, and by the | latter tor the crgction of a building in Q,ueenj Pkjkce of Wales Theatbe. The perfor- ' mantes last night were under the patronage oi r the Merchants of Auckland, and the management had little room to complain either ol the [quantity or quality of their guests, the mercani tile community was represented by many of the Heading firms of Auckland, and the entertaxni nicnts were received by tliem with every de--5 monstration ol approbation —the first piece was I £ianche's elegant comic drama oi " Faint 111 fart never won l air Lady" —itwas exceedingly fe well mounted, and the principal characters the sDuchess, and Kuy Comez were admirably susi tamed by Miss lanny "Young and Mr. Barry. 5 .Neither, in their assumption, left aught to be | desired, and they were well supported by the I other members of the company, ihe ExtravaSganza concluded the performance, and -was tie

signal for liearty laughter and applause, the dresses worn during the evening were of th» most elegant description, and elicited much admiration. 'I'o-night there is a strong attraction a new drama entitled " Harold Hawk or the Convict's Vengeance." The author, named Charles Selby, ol the Dramatic Authors Society would seem to bespeak an excellent commodity, although judging irom its title sensational in its characteristics. The wind up to use a sporting phrase will be with the sporting lixtravangaza, the lust two nights ol' which arc announced. We recommend those who have not seen it not to lose the opportunity ailorded, and those who have, to so again. The performance to-night will be under the patronage of Commodore Sir William Wiseman. Trr , Jv-aipaka—We understand that on Wednesday, two working parties under the orders of Mr. iiogan, the resilient magistrate, commenced opening up the road between Kiverliead, and itlie Awaroa, Kaipara, There are several patches of brush upon this line of road, and though practicable lor foot passengers, the work nowbeing carried on has been much wanted for the convenience of those travelling between the two places with drays or cattle. Pleubo I'ueumonia. —We observe in the Bruce Herald, an advertisement, offering for sale as a preventative to the diseasa of pleur© pueumonia, Mitchell's preserved vaccine lymph, in quantities for 50, 100, and 200 head of cattle, at prices of 205., 40s. and 60s. respectively. This patent vaccinator is said to have proved itself the only rational and certain method of preventing, checking and curing pleuro pueumonia in Victoria, JNew South W ales, and Queensland. Patent lances and forceps for operating, are also sold by the agents, Messsrs. "Wilkinson, 'and Dixon, Dunedin, so that settlers may themI selves perform the operation on their own

cattle. , , The Band or the 50th.—We are glad to announce that the band of this regiment, of the excellent music of which the Auckland public hare been so long deprived, will perform this afternoon at half-past three o'clock in the Albert Barracks. Our readers will remember that the reason of the discontinuance of the weekly | practice was caused by the placing the bandsmen on garrison duty. The correspondence which took place in our columns at the time upon the matter did not escape General Cameron's notice, and immediately on his re* turn to town he made the . necessary enquiries, audat once ordered the bandsmen to relieved from garrison duty. After to-day, the performlance 'will take place as heretofore on Friday afternoons, and, as to-day, in the Barracksquare —the Domain being too far out of town during »uch variable weather as the present. ; Indeed, we believe, it will be a far better arrangement. We do not see why the citizens of Auckland and their families should be debarred from the enjoyment ol good music to please the aristocratic (?) exclusiveness of a few who have perhaps more of the parvenu themselves than the honest citizens they affect to despise. The selections for to-day will be a* follows :— 1. March, " Masonic" .... Anon. 12. Overture, "ÜBarbiere . . Bossrni. 3. Yalse, "Waikato" •• . • Bergmann. 4. Coro and Aria, "La IraviaU. Verdi. 5. Quadrille, " Italian Campaign 1) Albert. 6. Galop, " Orpheus" .... btiegmann. God Save the Q.cnsN "

Selection ov $ueki>.—We take the following from an agricultural paper:—" beauty and. utility demand that the head of the sheep should be fino und small, gradually tapering towards the muzzle. The chest should lie deep and broad, tho back wide as well as level. The loins should bo wide at the hips, and not too prominent; the thighs full, and the legs short and small. The breeder should carefully examine the nature of his land; and, after mature consideration, should purchase that breed which he has reason to believe is best calculated for him. Though he should never suffer himself to he led into needless expense, by purchasing fashionable breeds, he should lie scrupulously particular in procuring the best blood of that particular breed on which he may fix. As on all cattle the uiale lias the greatest influence, it is important that the requisite essential to a good rani should he well understood. "His head." says Colly. " should be fine and small; his nostrils wide and expanded ; his eyes prominent, and rather bold and daring : his ears thin, his collar full from his breast to his shoulders, but tapering gradually all the way to the junction of the neck and head, which should be fine and graceful, being perfectly free from any course leather hanging down. The shoulders should be broad and full, which must at the same time join so easy to the eollar forward- and eliinebackward, as not to leave the least hollow in either place. The mutton upon his arm, or fore thigh, must come quite to the knee ; his legs upright, with a clear fine bone, equally clear from superfluous skin and coarse bniry wool, from the knee and hough downwards. The breast broad and well forward, which will keep his fore-legs at a proper widencss from each other. His chest- should be full and deep, end, instead of a hollow behind the shoulders, that part by some called the fore-flank, should be quite full; the back and loins broad, flat, and straight, from which the ribs rise with a fine circular arch. Thobollv should be straight: the quarter* long and full, with the mutton down to the hough, which should stand neither in nor out; and the whole body covered with a th:n pelt, and that with fine, bright, soft wool." The nearer any sheep comes to this description, the nearer it approaches to excellence of form. " It should, however, be remembered." ns Mr. ■1 ouatt says. " that symetry consists in flint shape which is best suited to the soil on which the animal is bred, and that which is thought in n Leicester sheep, may be found a deformity or an injury in a South-down or a Cheviot. The fineness and staple of the wool are of the greatest importance, and the pelt or coat should be carefully examined," _ Hartley, the discoverer of the Afolyneaux river diggings in Otaeo, is now we learn, prospecting for reefs in JS'orth Gipp's land. The Guardian reports that- he " expresses himself as being verv sanguine of success, believing that the lino of reef= exteiids easterly from Bnw Haw. passing through Donnelly's, Stringer's. Crooked i?iver, Merrijig. and an immense area of at present unprospected country, which presents the finest field in Victoria to prospecting enterprise."

Embarassment of the Southland Pkovincial Government.—The following paragraphs appear in the Southern JYc-?c.? of the 9th pays : —" the mystery is still maintained as to financial position of the province, and the people have not even the satisfaction of knowing that the Government are taking, or contemplating any effective measure for securing relief from nn embarnssment, the existence of which is the only patent fact of the situation." 'The succeeding day the following appeared: —"Although we are not at liberty to be communicative as to particulars, we may possibly to some extent restore public confidence by stating that, consequent upon the failure of Air. Beavens mission to Dunedin, the Government have taken other and more sensible and practical measures for the relief of the temporary financial embarassment of the Province. There is ground for hoping that arrangements may yet be made which will save the public credit, and prevent any stoppage of our public works." Auckland Rifle Volunteers. —Tenders for the making up of 250 suits of uniform for the Auckland Rifle Volnnteers will be received at the orderly room until noon of the 30th inst. Governmf.nt P':i7.F, Firing.—The men of the second class militia, competitors for the Government prizes, are reminded that their turn for firing will take place on the 31st Alny and Ist of June next, and that the future weekly parade of the battalion will be held on Tuesday mornings, in the Barrack square, at 7 a.m. Thatcher.—Yesterday evening His Excellency Sir Goo. Grey attended the Odd Fellows' Hall to hear the Inimitable Thatcher in his local songs. The house was of course well attended. • The local hits were well received, and the several singers were encored its usual. Aladame Yitelli was in excellent voice, and sang one or two English ballads with great feeling and taste. Agricultural Servants. —We are requested to inform country settlers, that there are some ploughmen and general farm servauts (uew arrivals per the ' Sir George Grey') in want of situations. Applications may be made at the Imigration Ofhcc. Auckland Lock-ui\—Tenders for the erection of a Lock-up for the City of Auckland, are required by Air. Keals, and will be received until noon of Monday, June the 27th. We hope that the Lock-up will bo both roomy and secure, and that our Police will be vigilant and introduce to its accommodations the prowling ruffians who are beginning to infest this hitherto quiet and well ordered community. The Sparrow.—A great and most unreasonable outcry has been raised against the introduction of the sparrow into this colony ; so much so, that one gentleman, who. some years ago, used very great exertions to do so, but we regret without success, was long known by I he ■■ /soubriquet of Sparrow B—d—e. We trust that difficult as it is to succeed in the acilimitisation of the liouse sparrow, that it will be attempted again and again, by the Acclimatisation Society, until successful, it is one of the most useful of the country birds at home in keeping down the grub, and the practice of giving head money in . some parishes for the unfortunate sparrow, has now been generally discontinued at liinie. In France, the sparrow is dignified with the title 01 game, and becomes a privileged individual. We take the following from the (Jta/jo Daily Timirx of the 13th instant:—"No doubt tLe sparrow destroys grain, but it is an old prejudice that it is an injury to the farmer; for it is well known, that, at times it destroys wheat, ut other times it is most beneficial to the farmer. Destroy the sparrow, and you save a little grain, but at. the same time you protect the grubs and other insects, which, were it not for the sparrows, would become a most serious evil. It is now found in France and England to be ' a pen 113' wise and pound foolish' policy to grudge the sparrow, say, two months' corn, for the benefit he confers on the farmer during the remaining ten mouths of the year. Were the Otago Accli - matisation Society to introduce some thousands ' • of sparrows, goldfinches, and other small birds, they would pay for themselves ten times over in the destruction of thistle seeds, to say nothing of the caterpillars, grubs, &c." j Mr. Theopuilus Hkalk.—There are few of' | our. earlier citizens but who remember with 1 respect and esteem our old fellow colonist, Air. Heale, who for the last three or four years has left us for the new province of Southland, The Invercargill Daily iVeivx of the IHli instant says : —"A most judicious choice has been made in selecting Mr. Heale to superintend the mineralogical and geological specimens to be forwarded from Southland to the .New Zealand Exhibition. That gentleman will enter con amure upon the task assigned to him, and if his bauds are not tied the result of his labours will be a fine collection of the mineral wealth of the Province, we are upon this subject we cannot avoid drawing attention to the granite quarries at Bluff Harbour, and from wiiich the stone used I

in the formal ion of the fine pier at that port, was 'obtained. Tlio TtluH' srranite is. wo believe, capable of receiving :i fino polish, and is well adapted for building purposes. Several beautiful granites are also fonnd in quantity on Stewart's Tslnnd. Why should not those quarries he worked, mid why should granite not he used in the construction of various public buildings in New Zealand ? Tt. might ;ilsi> in time fonn an article of export. At nil event-the subject is worth consideration—anv action would ho heller llian the apathetic folilinpof Ibo hands which appears (o be our besetting .-in.

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DEATH OF COLONEL NIXON., New Zealand Herald, Volume I, Issue 169, 28 May 1864

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DEATH OF COLONEL NIXON. New Zealand Herald, Volume I, Issue 169, 28 May 1864

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