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ENGLISH NEWS.

Epsom Races. — These far-famed races " came off " in the last week in May. The "Derby," of course, attracted the greatest interest,, and was won by Mr. Rawlinson's " Coronation ; " Lord Westminster's " Van Amburgh " received the second place. Twenty-seven others' started. Value of stakes, £4,275. We understand that Mr. Rawlinson wins about £8,000 in addition to the stake, but that the largest is Mr. Isaac Day, who of late has had the management of the horse. Most of the betting men are losers, and the settling is likely to be a heavy one. • Ascot Races. — "Coronation's" performance at Epsom put the "Ascot Derby" into Mr. Rawlinson's pocket, without the trouble of a race. The Queen and a large assemblage of fashionables, were present. The Provinces. — The newspapers contain disastrous account of the thunder storm of Thursday, May 26. In many places, great damage has been done to buildings, whila the ravages of the storm out of doors are not less complete, and far more distressing than within doors. The devastation of the crops is immense; whole fields of beans, peas, and turnips, besides wheat, are as com-

pletely levelled as if they had been cut off by a scythe, and several small farmers will probably be ruined. . The flower gardens present a most melancholy spectacle, being completly strewed with the wrecks of their late luxuriance, and the shoots of the young forest trees are, in many places, quite cut off.

Hbros at Loggerheads. — A farewell entertainment was given on the 11th of May, at Malta, to Sir R. Stopford, by the officers of the Mediterranean Fleet, when the venerable Admiral made use of expressions towards Sir Charles Napier, which we are sure every man in the country will read with regret. Sir Robert Stopford claimed all the merit of the successful operations on the coast of Syria to himself, and said that had Sir Charles Napier not been present, others would have been found to perform the duty. We have no doubt there are many officers in the navy as brave and as determined as Sir Charles Napier, but bravery and determination are nothing without judgment. On this eventful occassion, Sir Charles Napier showed that he was not only brave, but judicious, and adopted the best means for carrying into effect the treaty of July. We would advise Admiral Stopford not to adopt the same language when he returns to this country. Every human being here gives the whole merit of the successful operations on the coast of Syria to Sir Charles Napier, and the universal opinion is, that if Sir R. Stopford, at his advanced age, had been without such an assistant, the contest would have been prolonged till the Thiers' party in France had found good reasons for joining with Meheraet Ali, and bringing on an European war. Sir C. Napier is recognised as the only man in the fleet worthy to be ranked with Nelson, and Sir Robert Stopford would, therefore, act wisely in not provoking a comparison. — Statesman.

Employment of Sir Charles Napier. — It will be seen by the latest naval appointments, which appear exclusively in our columns, that the gallant Napier has been appointed to the command of our naval station at Lisbon. The British merchants in Portugal could not have a more vigilant protector of their interests, and the appointment cannot fail to elicit their most cordial approbation. The Portuguese also must hail with joy this second meeting with their deliverer. But if Lord Minto thus picks out his best men, in what manner are the electors of Marylebone to support Lord John Russell ? We believe the gallant sailor will himself be the first to say that England contains " five hundred as good as he." On the quarter-deck the hero of Sidon and Acre is without a rival. On v the hustings, honest, determined, and unflinching as he is, there are many ready and able to supply his place. We must, however, express our regret that the appointment should necessarily have been made at present, as the presence of Sir Charles Napier in Parliament would be gratifying to all his admirers. — Ibid.

At a meeting of the Marylebone electors, on the night following the publication of the the above paragraph, Sir Charles in addressing them, thus alludes to the report, by which it will be seen that the gallant commodore means in reality to distinguish himself in Marylebone, as he has already done at St. Jean d'Acre : —

His text that night bore upon an article which had been inserted in the British Queen and Statesman newspaper, very kindly appointing him (the gallant commodore) to a command at Lisbon, whereas he had only, on Friday last, resigned his ■ command in the Mediterranean, in order that no obstacle might be thrown in the way of his aspiring to the honour of a portion of the command in Marylebone. — (Loud cheers.) The gallant commodore here read the article he had alluded to, and observed that the excellent Editor of that journal had been grossly imposed upon. . With so much art had the imposition been practised, that it had been sent to the paper as an official communication from Lord Minto ; and the parties had gone down to Woolwich, in order that it might pass through the hands of the Woolwich correspondent of the journal in question. (Cries of " shame.") He (Sir C. Napier), however, was too old a sailor to allow his flag to be turned. (Loud cheers and laughter.)

The Montem. — This triennial celebration, of the Montem took place on Tuesday, being Whit Tuesday, according to almost immemorial custom. The >number of persons assembled on this occasion was greater by some thousands than we remember to have seen on any former Montem, and we have witnessed a good many, including the times of George 111., George IV., and his successors, King William IV., and her present Majesty. The trains of the Great Western Railway brought host after host of visitors to Slough ; one train brought upwards of 1,000. By 11 o'clock the amount of arrivals was at its height. Her Majesty arrived at about half-past 10 o'clock, and was received by the Provost, the Fellows of Eton, the head Master, and assistant masters, in the usual manner. She was accompanied by his Royal Highness Prince Albert, Lord Melbourne, Earl Albernarle, Earl of Uxbridge, and her usual suite. At 1 1 o'clock

the crowding to get into the quadrangle of the College was tremendous. At this time her Majesty and Prince Albert showed themselves at the great window of the College library in the clock tower, from which they commanded a full view of the procession. They were cheered in an enthusiastic manner, and they bowed repeatedly in acknowledgment of the expression of loyal feeling exhibited. The procession began to move from the College on its way to Salt-hill at about 20 minutes before 12 o'clock, accompanied by the band of the Ist Life Guards and the band of the Rifles. The sight was of its kind a very splendid one, the dresses of the Salt-bearers, the attendants on the " Captain," on the " Mareschal," and on the other authorities and magnates of the day, were very elegant and appropriate. The " Captain," Mr. Thring, the head boy on the foundation of the school, was, as is the custom, habited in scarlet, with cocked hat, feathers, sword, &c. The boys on arriving at the Mount took their stations around the lower parts of it. The standard-bearer ascended to the summit, and the carriage of her Majesty having been drawn up immediataly at the bottom of the hill, so that she and her Royal consort could command a perfect view of the whole, the ceremony of waving the flag commenced, and was performed in an admirable manner, and with untiring strength by the standard-bearer. Her Majesty looked remarkably well, and seemed to enjoy the sight. It was in every respect a most gratifying one. After the departure of the Royal party, the eating and drinking in Mr. Bothman's inn commenced, and was succeeded by the promenade in the gardens of the inn, which were crowded with company. We understand the head boy or captain, Mr. Thring, will receive in " salt " or money collected, upwards of £3,000, but out of this he has to defray expenses that amount to nearly one-half. — Times.

Weymouth. — Capture of a French Smuggling Lugger. — On the 18th ultimo, whilst the Eagle revenue cutter, commanded by Lieutenant Ray, R.N., was cruising in the West Bay, about eight miles to the westward of the Bill of Portland, and sailling under square sail and half-topsail, Lieutenant Ray espied a large French lugger making for the coast, of which no notice was taken until she came nearly abreast ; the Frenchman evidently taking the Eagle (from her wily appearance) for a coaster. The Eagle then made sail, and gave chase, which was soon observed by the lugger, which, in an attempt to escape, was put on wind. The chase now became interesting, and some doubt existed whether the Eagle would have come ~trp-with her. There was a spanking breeze, and just the one that suited the sailing qualities of both ; however, the lugger, finding the cutter gaining upon her, altered her point of sailing, but gained nothing by this manoeuvre, and then commenced throwing over her cargo, which is supposed, from her size, to have consisted of upwards of 200 tubs. After a gallant chase of thirty-five minutes, she was boarded by one of the English boats, who found eight men and twenty-two tubs of foreign spirits on board. The boat picked up only fourteen of the tubs thrown overboard.

Uncertainty of Life. — Mr William Boulton, of New-streefe, Birmingham, son of Mr. Boulton, of Alcester, was married on Tuesday week at Harborue Church, to Alice Jane, daughter of Edward Cox, Esq., of Harborne House, and our obituary of last week contained an announcemeat of his death, which took place one week after his marriage. It appears that during the night previous to the wedding, Mr. Boulton was taken so unwell, that the presence of his medical attendant was deemed absolutely necessary. This gentleman, finding him seriously ill, endeavoured to persuade him to postpone the marriage nuptials. So bent, however, was the lamented gentleman upon fulfilling, his engagement, that this advice was unheeded. He appeared at the altar, and was evidently labouring under a most severe disease. The hand of death was upon him, and he looked the being of another world, being scarcely able to support his tottering frame during the performance of the marriage ceremony. This hapless state threw a gloom and melancholy over that scene which, under other and happier circumstances, would have been one of joy and gladness. The ceremony ended, the party proceeded to Leamington, where the suffering bridegroom was immediately placed under the care of that eminent physician, Dr. Jephson, who applied every means which medical skill and talent could suggest, but, alas ! without avail. On Tuesday, the Ist inst., one week from the marriage-day, the new-made bridegroom bade adieu to the world, and breathed his last farewell to her, the young and beauteous bride, who, scarce eight days before, was full of joy and hope, and looking forward with high expectations to years of happiness to come — who, from her bridal day, became the anxious nurse, and watched incessantly by the bedside of her suffering partner — who in so

short a time was doomed to exchange the gay and glittering dress of the bride for the mournful garb of the widow. This truly sad event has excited deep sympathy at Birmingham, Alcester, Studley, Redditch, &c, where the respective families are well known and much esteemed. — Worcester Chronicle.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZGWS18411023.2.10

Bibliographic details

ENGLISH NEWS., New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator, Volume II, Issue 83, 23 October 1841

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1,952

ENGLISH NEWS. New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator, Volume II, Issue 83, 23 October 1841

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