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lished in a London Gazette Extraordinary: — Buckingham Palace, 2\st November, 1840.— This afternoon, at ten minutes before two, the Queen was happily delivered of a Print ess. Mia Royal Highness Pritica Albert, Fl-r Royal Highness the Duchess of Keat. «<» eral Lord*" of her Majesty's Most Honorable Privy Council and the L idies of her M yesty's bedchamber, taing present. This great and important news was immediately made known to the town, by the firing of the Tower guns ; and the Privy Council being assembled as soon as possible thereupon, at the Council Chamber, \Vhitoh:ill, it was ordered that a form of thanksgiving for the Queen's safe delivery of a Princess ba prepared by his Grace the Archbishop of Canterbury, to be used in all churches and chapels throughout England an 'I "Wales, and the town of Berwick-upun-Tweed, «m Sunday the 20c!i November, or on the Sunday after ths respective ministers shall receive the same.

Her Majesty and the young Princess are, God be praised, both well.

The Court Circular contains the following official record of the circumstances and ob^. servances with which the event was ushereJ in : — Her Majesty was taken unwell at an e-irlv hour on Saturday morning, and the medical gentlemen were in consequence sumtnonei to Buckingham Paace.

The Duchess of Kent w,is sent for nt halfpast eight o'clock, by His Royal Highness Prince Albert. Her llny.d ll!ghne« imwdintply went to the Palace, and remained w.th her Mijesty throughout the day, until six o'clock in the evening. The infant Princess having been brought into the room where the Ministers andgreatO.iioer.4 of State were assembled, their L'irdslups t.iok their departure from the Palace directly afterwards.

In the course of the afternoon such manifestations were made of public rejoicinsr as the suddeness of the occasion permitted. The bells of the parish-churches in the vicinity of the royal palaces were soon set ringing ; and at the Theatres, in the evening, the companies sang the national anthem. At most of the club-houses the health of the royal mother aiv.l infant wer2 drunk with emflressement. The Benchers of the Middle Temple broke through a technical form, (Saturday being the closing day of their "grand weel", ')in order to present each mess of four with an extra bottle at dinner; at Gray's Inn, the Benchers distributed claret in the Hall, to drink the health of the Q.\iecn and Prince Albert and the i ifant.

On Sunday morning, the Court physicians announced that the Queen had passed "an excellent night," and that both mother and child were "going on favourably in every respect."

Throughout Sunday, St James's Park was crowded by persons of both sexes, anxious to obtain some news, though they could v of course learn nothing beyond what the official bulletin told. The river presented a very gay appearance, since all the craft, native and foreign, were dressed with flags.

The royal cradle was sent in to the Palace just in time for use, for it was delivered only during the week. It is thus described :—: —

The b»dy of the cot is in the shape of that cleg nt marine-shell the nautilus ; being a h;ipj y conception of the designer, that ths chilti of the Ocean Queen should enjoy its first slumbers and be cradled in a cot whose v.?ry form is emblematic of the main strength and glory of its 'islanl home.' The frame work is ot the choicest Spanish m ihogaiiy, and the bottom and sides padded and quilted in fmtes ; the whole of which, inside and out, is covered with rich green silk, embroidered most splendidly with the white rose of England. Between each flute is a circular rib of m ihogwny, the edges of which are richly gilt. The cot swings between pillars of mahogany, standing on plinths supported by four lions feet, beautifully carved and gilt. The canopy is finely scolloped, and hung with silk and drapery of tlie same design as the lining. The whole is gilt and surmounted with the royal crown, and represents a tout ensemble at once c) issic and unique. The baths are not vet finished, but are being expedited s>s rapidly as possible ; and it is understood that one will be lined with silver and the other with marble.

Acording to the gossip current last week, the chief physician-accoucheur was sadly perplexed in the choice of nurse for the royal baby. There was a formidable array of candidates for the honour ; many of them backed by recommendations of the greatest influence. The Cheltenham Looker-on, which is the authority for this piece of Court gossip, adds — " Let it not be supposed however, that the nursing of the royal infant will be altogether a very easy or a very comfortable olfice. From the chief superintendent down to the sub - deputy- assistant - supernumerary- nurse, all and every one are to be forbi Iden, under any circumstance or pretext whatever, to 4 kiss the child ;' so that let her royal babyship squall ever so loudly, the usual nursery endearments are forbidden, and they may pacify her as they best may."

It is understood that the infant Princess Royal is to receive the names of " Adelaide Victoria Louisa."

The Duchess of Kent presented the Princess Royal with her christening coverlet of green satin, lined with white, and ornamented with needle work, the loom and the needle being equally directed by British hands.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZGWS18410410.2.11

Bibliographic details

New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator, New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator, Volume 10, Issue 52, 10 April 1841

Word Count
895

New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator New Zealand Gazette and Wellington Spectator, Volume 10, Issue 52, 10 April 1841

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