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Social Gossips

Deae Christabei/, — "TN England lately, Sir Auckland ®- Geddea has been-asserting his authority with regard to office " flappers " and their weird notions of how to dress during office hours. Apart from their inefficiency, tendency to brew tea at- all -hours, in all places, and chattering ■habits in business hours, Sir Auckland put s his large- thumb down on their "undress" clothes. No more low necks, transparent "Seymour" blouses, elbow sleeves, flowing locks, or very short, tight skirts, says fierce Sir Auckland. •

This stern decree has produced much wailing and gnashing of teeth, and scattering of pearl powder in flapper•dom. In fact, after a net had been drawn through one Government department, only one flapper survived the i;est. Her superior officers testified that she " dressed quietly, did her work without chattering and fussing." Some •departments have decreed that a quiet uniform shall be worn in office hours. Lovers of plain and simple styles will rejoice to hear that Paris has 'chosen one material for a teacher that has. the sanction of ages behind it, and that is blue serge. Evidently blue dye is procurable and reliable in Europe ■again, although it is impossible to have a faded blue, serge dipped here any colour but a hard, fusty black. The Parisian, modiste starts with a blue serge,/: and then relies upon a clever liand design in silk braid, wool or , beads .to give the garment style and -distinction.

One smart serg© had a- plaid, design in tiny beads worked all over the coat —sleeves and all. One very chic young "Wellington, matron is wearing a blue cloth, coat and skirt, with a diagonal design worked all over the coat in tinsel thread. Another sample of a tailored serge was trimmed with red upholsu tery braid, with two strands of dark blue wool running through it, and yet another serge was enhanced with lines of silver braid sewn on with blue crossstitch.

As leather is very scarce and very expensive, French designers have de-cided-—probably out of pure "cussedness that all tailored gowns shall have bindings and edgings of leather. During the war, when wool was almost unprocurable, every hat had woollen ornaments on it.

A very large circle of friends will sympathise with the Hon. Colonel W. D. H. Baillie, on the death of his wife, who lived- to the ripe old age of 89. Mrs Baillie retained her memory and great intellectual gifts to the end. She was a very brilliant pianist, and could read any music, however difficult, at sight. Since Colonel Baillie lost his eyesight, she became his eyes, and read to him, and- kept him conversant with the politics and literature of the day. It was a beautiful sight to see the gallant colonel supporting his wife on hisi arm, while she guided his footsteps along our crowded streets. Not very long ago Colonel and Mrs Baillie celebrated their diamond wedding.

Mr and Mrs James Mackenzie (Karon), who have been absent' on a trip

to England, are returning to New Zealand at the. end of the month. Miss Mackenzie is "going to Auckland to meet her parents. Miss Sheila- Mackenzie has been on a visit to Timaru.

Miss Gladys Campbell, the well-well-known teacher of dancing, left in the Argyleshire for England yesterday. While in London she intends to study the newest fashions in dancing.

Mrs Fulton gave a large and exceedingly pleasant tea party last Thursday in honour of her daughter, Mrs Horton, who has recently arrived from Home. The house was decorated with masses of beautiful roses of every shade of crimson, pink and yellow. Mrs Fulton wore a gown of black ninon relieved with a design of gold thread, and Mrs Horton's pretty brown satin frock was draped, and the bodice finished with panelsi of brightly-coloured Oriental silk, and confined with a girdle of gold cord. Mrs L. Blundell and Mrs W. Kennedy helped to pour out the tea and coffee, and the cakes, which were really delicious, were tnucli appreciated by everyone.

Amongst the guests were Mesdames Field, Miles, C. B. Morison, H. Steele, Stafford, Lever, D 5 Oj'ley, Hobbs (Feilding), W. Young, Alec Young, Russell, Dyniock, Triggs, Fisher, McEwan, Ward, H. Gore and the Misses Coates, Morton, H. Miles, D'Oyley, Seed.

Mr W. J. B.ees, aa well-known citizen of Auckland, passed through Wellington on Monday last on Ms way to attend the Presbyterian General As- 5 ' sembly at Invercargill. When the Assembly is over he intends-paying a' visit to his daughter and son-in-law, Mr and Mrs Cyril Blundell, in Tassy-land.

Miss K. Drummondj who has been absent in England for the past three years, has returned to New Zealand. Mis Drummond spent a large part of her time nursing at Waltham :on Thames. Her sister, Nurse Drummond, came up from Chrietchurch to meet. her. Miss Zona Vallance and Miss N. Armstrong are the guests of Mrs Earle Williams, Lowry Bay.,

Squirrel, it is said, will be the popular fur in Paris this winter. "Whereupon, a funny paper drily suggests that Germany can be depended on to send " a mee"lot of skunks."

Mr and Mrs Stott are on a holiday visit to the South Island. n * * * Mrs Norman Brookes, wife of the Australian tennis champion, has been spending the last few weeks' in hospital in Auckland. She and her husband, who had been playing in the big tennis contests in America, were passengers out "on the last trip of the Niagara. During the voyage Mrs Brookes took ill, and it was learned that, she was threatened with appendicitis. On arrival- at Auckland they had to break their journey to Australia, and Mrs Brookes, went into .-.hospital to undergo the necessary operation. She is now recovered, and she and Mr Brookes continued their way home to Melbourne by the Maheno last week.

• A very pretty wedding was solemnised at tne Basilica, in Hill Street, last week, when Miss Margaret Levett, second daughter of Mr J . T. !Levett, of Kelburn, was united, in matrimony to Mr T. Kearins, of Kio Kio. The Rev. Father Smythe was the officiating ■priest. The bride, who was given away by her father, wore a very becoming gown of ivory duchess satin and georgette, with gold bead embroidery . and beautifully draped with fine lace. Her tulle veil formed a train. Miss Kathleen lievett, a younger sister, was bridesmaid. She wore a draped frock of pale blue crepe de chine with trimmings of lavender velvet and pink rosebuds. Her hat was of tulle to match, with streamers of lavender velvet. Mr J. Kearins attended his brother as best man. A reception was. afterwards held at the residence of the brid&'s father, when the usual toasts were honoured.. The happy pair left by motor for the north on the honeymoon, the bride wearing a smart frock of lavender cloth with heavy guipure embroideries, and a toque en suite. She also wore a grey squirrel coat, the gift of her father.

The Grand Opera House was filled on Saturday afternoon with a crowd of happy folks, mostly children, who had gathered in strength to witness -the •dance recital of Miss. Carwell Cooke's pupils.. ; A capital programme . was given, consisting, of solo dances and ballets, which were all well dressed and «taged. The opening item consisted of a grand, march of all the pupils., large and . small. Some, indeed, were the •quaintest of tiny tots—smartly garbed in black and white uniforms.

An original song, " New Zealand— Our Land of Hope," written by Mr •'Carwell' Cooke, and set to music by Mr C. Clarkson, was sung by all the pupils, and much appreciated by everybody. Miss Carwell Cooke herself trod a graceful measure with her small partner, Dudleigh Carstins, and_ she also gave a picturesque skipping rope dance. * * * ■* & At the close of the successful performance heaps of bouquets and chocolate boxes were handed to the young performers by their admiring friends, and Miss Carwell Cooke was presented

with a set of ebony hair brushes, comb and'mirror by Mr Roland, on behalf of her pupils, as a loving token and souvenir. AH the proceeds of the matinee go to the fund for the renovation of the Nurses' Club. The stalls, which sold flowers, cakes, and sweets, were in charge of the wives of the local doctors, realised the large sum of £30—a valuable addition to the takings" of the afternoon. K * * •» ' Mrs McEwan has returned from a long visit to Australia. *.* * * Mrs (Dr) Mason is taking a course of baths at Rotorua. * * » ' » A marriage of interest to many people has taken place lately, that of Mr Percy Adams to Miss Murray. Mr and Mrs. Adams have recently returned from Australia, where they were married, and' are' now in their home in Nelson.

Two valued and popular employees of the firm of Messrs George and Kersley—Mrs Pegg and Miss Anderson— were th e recipients last week of a very handsome presentation. These ladies have been in the employ of the firm for 25 years, in fact Miss Anderson had attained her " business" majority on the very day of the presentation. Mrs Pegg received a beautiful silver rose bowl on an ebony stand from the directors, a cheque from the firm, a handsome brass fruit stand and a cloisonne vase from the hea-ds of departments, and a beautifully bound set of Stevenson's works from the clerical staff. All of these gifts were placed on her table and surrounded with a garniture of lovely roses, each tied with white satin ribbon, on which was printed the dates of her 25 years of service, and. the names of the various departmental heads. Miss Anderson also received a handsome silver rose bowl from the firm, and a silver tea service from the departments. *

The many friends- of Miss Ella Marchant will be grieved to hear of her sudden death on Friday last, in Invercargill. Miss Marchant received her earlier education at the. well-known

school of the Misses Greenwood, "on The Terrace. She showed from her earliest years great aptitude for learning, and at a comparatively youthful age took her degree and a position first of all as junior mistress first of all at Miss Swainson's school and afterwards in the Girls' High School here, and then she became head mistress of the Otago High School, which post she filled with great credit for 16 years. Then she resigned, and at the request of the Church of England authorities she accepted in turn the positions of head of the Training College for Girls in Bishopscourt, Christchurch, the Church of England Orphanage, Auckland, and the Primary Church School, Invereargill. Miss Marchant's was a career of which her family, her numerous friends, schoolmates, and pupils may be Justly proud. * * * # Mrs Johnston (Highden) is giving a farewell tea this afternoon to "her "Wellington friends prior to her return to her home in Palmerston North.. Miss Baldwin, who has been staying with her, returns to Palmerston,, alßo.

Mrs Stott gave a girls' tea yesterday (Tuesday) for Miss Lydia Field, whose marriage takes place early next week. f • ■ * ■ •» Miss Heath's wedding to Mt T: Shatter Weston will take place in Gisborne before Christmas. DAPHNE.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZFL19191119.2.18

Bibliographic details

Free Lance, Free Lance, Volume XIX, Issue 1012, 19 November 1919

Word Count
1,855

Social Gossips Free Lance, Volume XIX, Issue 1012, 19 November 1919

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