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All Sorts of People

MR. Charles Hill, of Wellington, celebrated his 87th birthday at pretty residencei at Island Bay on Thuis. day last and was the recipient of numerous congratulatory messages. The members of the Te Hiwi Bowling Club, of which Mr Hill is. a president, met and made a complimentary presentation according to their amiable custom. The old gentleman is wonderfully bright and alert, both physically and mentally for his advanced years. He is trudging on with characteristic cheerfulness towards the century mile-post.

Our Christchurch correspondent writes: "Our Mayor, Doc. Thacker, is gradually getting into the rough water through which one must steer if one aims, as the Doc. does, for real eminence. City Councillors 9itfe beginning to resent the Doc's habit of saying 'Resume your seat' and to roast him a little, and the Doc. is not very agile in warding off their blows or in side-stepping when he puts his foot in it. The other' night a Councillor moved that Councillors accept an invitation to a + t:nd a certain special church service, jcie himself, he added, would be absent. The inevitable laughter came at this innocent remark, and the Doc. instantly resolved to appear as a hater of levity. 'That,' he said, 'is quite an improper remark to make.' The Councillor concerned was enraged. 'It was not an improper observation,' he said. 'I made it simply because I might be absent upon the occasion and my absence might be noted.' Did the Doc. apologise ? Not a bit. _ He blandly answered, 'You are quite right. I knew what was in your mind. That was why I gave you the chance to explain.' Can you beat it? This is like his announcement that General Russell would _be welcomed in the picture theatresi, being carted from one to the other, until all the public had seen him. 'Doc.' said; the papers, .'that is an asinine idea.' And the Doc. cheerfully answered, 'Quite right; I only made the suggestion in order to invite comment.' Again I ask, can you beat it? We love our Doc.."

A Dunedin man has recently (declared that Sinn Fein does not mean "Ourselves Alone," but "We fight" or something like that, and incidentally be mentioned that Father O'Neill, of Waikiwi, is the only Gaelic scholar of any consequence in this country. This brought Father O'Neill out with a letter in which he pokes fun elaborately at his. brother Gael .Which he does by saying that Bolshevik isi Irish, carried to Russia by Irish soldiers shouting out a war cry, loud enough to be heard in Petrograd. In his young days, he says, he often heard the cry "Buail she avic," which means, "hit him, my lad." And so the Irish soldiers, dealing it out to Fritz, started the ignorant Russians on their career as Bolsheviks, or the stoush party.

Madame de Alma, clairvoyante, of Colombo" street, Christ church, who for half a. crown tears the secrets of the future from the future's cloudy bosom,. sells sweets in her spare time. On a recent Sunday a man went to Madame's place and bought some peppermint drops, which he duly paid for. Madame's clairvoyancy must have been taking its Sunday off, or contact with the future must, have been interrupted owing to telegraph poles falling across the line, for she failed to perceive that in a few days the stranger would confront her in a Court, wearing a uniform, arid tell all about it to a magistrate, who would fine the lady 5s foi Sunday trading. Anyway, that is what happened. As a clairvoyante Madame de Alma does not appear to be a shining success. Indeed, she appears not to be too skilful at seeing plain things with the naked eye. A John Hop in plain clothes is such an easily detected object that one does not need "to be a clairvoyante to draw deductions from his feet.

Australia has discovered that Admiral Jellicoe isn't a tall man and that he won't talk. The press penny-a-liners are in despair for though there's so much "jelly" in the little sailor's name he can't be squeezed for even a par .

Whose is the "unseen hand" which Councillor George Frost darkly hinted at the. last meeting of the Wellington City Council, as controlling the trams of the city P Labour Councillor Hutchison said that the imputation was that it was his. Did the cap fit?

In the retirement of tbe Eev. J. Reed Glass'on from the pasitorate of #he! Terrace Congregational C.hurch, after occupying the pulpit for the last quarter of a century, the Congrega-

tional body in Wellington loses one of its most able ministers. Mr Glasson succeeded an able and popular preacher in the late Dr. West, but he soon proved himself equal to all the requirements of the position. He endeared himself to the people and his sermons showed, that he was abreast of the best religious, thought of the day. They were ■distinguished' by breadth and tolerance of view. Mr 'Glasson retires at his own wish and to the great regret of hi 6 congregation. ■jfc # # *3r ■ "X" Mr Michael Donnelly, who died! at Christchurch last week-end, was essentially a self-made man. He achieved an honourable position for himself in the profession of journalism and law. He came as a child with his parents from Tasmania to Dunedin, took there to newspaper work, taugjit himself shorthand and in the late '70's had climbed to the position of chief reporter of the "Dunedin Morning Herald." Always studiousi and ambitious he applied' all his- leisure to attending t]ae university classes for. the study of law and political science.

He had! the courage about this time to run the late Hon. W. J. M. Larnach for one of the Dunedin seats but got beaten. However lie had compensation in passing the solicitors' law examination and entered into practice at Christchurch, where he soon afterwards passed the barristers' examination. He made his mark as an advocate and had he got into Parliament— for which he made another unsuccessful attempt in Christchurch—he would certainly have won his spurs in debate. The fact that Mr Donnelly came from Tasmania reminds us that Tassy-land Las supplied; New Zealand! with more than one good journalist. The late Mr C. M. Cromibie who was on the Hansard staff for many years and became Commissioner of Taxes was a Tasmanian. So was Mr Parkinson, the present proprietor of the ' 'Hawera Star."

The death of Mr Norman Macleod. business manager of the "Bulletin," (writes Rona, the Free Lance's Sydney correspondent) came as a great shock on Friday week last. Mr Macleod senior feels the blow very deeply, for his eldest son was always his righthand man in the business. Quite young —only 36 —Norman has always shown a great aptitude for business and his father for some time past has been able to take things easy, knowing that all would be well with his eldest son at the head of things. The cause of death, was pneumonic influenza, from which his wife and! youngest daughter are now suffering.

Millionaire J- H. Hart, of Brooklyn, New York, is affording the public something new in the way of divorce suits. He was 86 when he married nineteen-year-old Katie Wolf a year ago, . and now he wants the bond 1 to be severed because he is too old. With bright "prospects" ahead Katie very naturally is not having any, and is resisting with all the legal might she can round up. The courtship lasited a week and the aged bridegroom left after about two weeks of married bliss. During the hearing of the case Katie's lawyer put a doctor into the witness box and asked if 86 was too old to marry. "Not according to Scriptures," sm,id the man of pills. We don't know yet how the case ended.

Another American girl has captured a prince and become a princess. In New York at the end of April last Miss Frances Simpson Stevens of Chicago became the bride of Prince Dimitry Golitzine, an officer of the Russian Navy, and son of the late General Dimitry Golitzine, who was Governor-Gen-eral of Moscow for many years until

his death, just prior to the beginning of the worud war. The deputy clerk (we call him the registrar) tied the nuptial knot in the presence of a few witnesses, after the happy couple had obtained their marriage license. This marriage is said to be the culmination of a romance which began when the Prince, was attached to the Russian Em 11 - assy at Washington, and attended a dinner given in honour of the Russian Ambassador, Georges Bahkmeteff, at which Miss Stevens was also a guest. She was a Red Cross worker at that time. Shortly afterward, when the Czar abdicated, the Prince sailed for Vladivostock, where he served as a captain of marines; with the loyal Russian forces. He mourns two brothers, victims of the Bolsheviki.

A curious point in the evidence adduced 1 at the recent trial in London of Lieut.-Col. N. O. Rutherford for the murder of Major Miles C; Seaton was the testimony of one witness thatColonel Rutherford had told him a month before the tragedy that he had had a realistic dream in which he killed Major Seaton, and that he woke from this dream trembling and terrified. The jury brought in a verdict of wilful murder against Rutherford, but he has since been committed to a mental hospital on the ground of insanity. Colonel Rutherford's marriage which ended so unhappily began with an elopement. When he was a medical student in Yorkshire he was a frequent visitor at the home of Sir James Roberts, Bart., of Strathlian Castle, Scotland. He and Sir James's daughter Alice, fell in love, and, despairing of obtaining the family approval of their engagement, secretly eloped; and were married over the border. Lieut.-Col. Rutherford had a distinguished military career in the Royal Medical Corps. He has been repeatedly mentioned in despatches and is the possessor of the Distinguished Service Order Medal, received! ''for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty when in charge of an advanced dressing station. .... near Ypres, June 6-8, 1917."

Major Seaton, whom .lie killed, was 45 years of age, and belonged to an old Cornish family. He was. an M.B. and F.R.C.S. of Edinburgh University and anaesthetic at Alfred Hospital at

Melbourne, where he was residing when lie joined! the Australian Medical Corps and went to the front.

Mr Sydney Hoben, brother of the late Ernest D. Hoben, has been in the United States for the past two years and just now is living at Pasandena, one of the suburbs of Los Angegeies. But the hostalia that pulls* us home again is on him and at latest accounts he was thinking hard l of coming back to his native New Zealand and settling down at Christchurch before Christmas next. Sydney Hoben is an accomplished solo "pianist and a cultured musician.

When old William Ewart Gladstone was in the zenith of his political'fame he received from an English hatter a presentation cap and the following: letter : I send you a cap which 1 think will prove good' for your head (size ?■£). As a hatter I take an interest in collecting sizes of heads of eminent men. The following are a few sizes of popular heiads. Lord Chelmsford, 6J-; Duke of York, 6f; Dean Stanley, 6f; Emperor of Germany, 6i; Prince of Wales, 7; Burns and Dickens 7-J; Earl Russell, ; W. M. Thackeray, 7#; Dan O'Connell, 8; Dr. Thomson* (Archbishop of York), 8 full; Joseph Hume, M.P. (the financier),. BJ. This gives you the whole scale frtim the smallest to the largest known. Your favourite author, Sir Walter Scott's head was about 7. Our Sovereign, Queen Victoria's head, from a close view I once got,, I take to be 6f size." Mr Gladstone, in accepting the cap as a gift, sent the following reply, C 'l thank you very much for the handy cap you have sent me. The sizes of the heads q;iven are full of interest."

The Emir Feisul, the picturesque Arab delegate to the Paris Peace Congress, was taken up for a joy flight over Paris the other day. He said he enjoyed himself very much, but would very much like to have been able to drop a few bombs overboard just to get the real feeling .

Mr F. T. Evans, best known in Rugby circles as "Dutchy," one of the best referees in the Dominion, is in private .life a schoolmaster. Lately he has been headmaster of the Linwood school (Christehurch), but the Government has decided to try lum out as a referee in the teaching game and 1 has offered him a post as actininspector of primary schools in the Canterbury district. "Dutchy" ought to make a fair-minded inspector and a good judge of a teacher's personality, whiqh, is one of the things that count in the grading of the profession.

It evidently takes more than a doctor to frighten the popular Governor of New South Walea, Sir Walter Davidson, who recently alarmed his household and many friends by "having a serious heart seizure in the vice-regal garden. His "Ex." treated the matter very lightly afterwards. "I had a very close call," .he said at a party. "But my doctor tells me I can hope for a further tenancy of six to eight years, provided the _ tenant putsi in some internal and structural repairs." If the Governor is really as bad as that (and he doesn't look it) he evidently intends to wear out instead of rusting out, for it is said that he bobs up and down at meetings and functions continuously—both afternoon and night.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/NZFL19190618.2.5

Bibliographic details

All Sorts of People, Free Lance, Volume XVIII, Issue 989, 18 June 1919

Word Count
2,286

All Sorts of People Free Lance, Volume XVIII, Issue 989, 18 June 1919

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