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OUT DOOR SPORTS AND PASTIMES

By Touchline.

RUGBY FOOTBALL.

The End of the Season.

WITH the playing of the match between a team from the soldiers at Trentharu and the Athletics (the local champions), at the Athletic Park last Saturday, the curtain has been rung down on the 1915 Rugby season. I will have a little to say about this match later on: what lam engaged! on at the moment is some casual thoughts .on the year's football just concluded. In the first place, let me say that things have gone better with us than I anticipated they would, and a sufficient amount of interest has been manifested in the games by the players and the enthusiasts as to have .-justified the Rugby Onion in carrying out their set programme of matches. And, in saying this, it must not be forgotten that the playing of these games has not interfered in any way with Wellington's assistance in the more serious business of the war in Europe. The players have taken part in the games, but they have been enlisting, too.

Just in. passing here, at the little function held "by the Rugby "Union and the Referees' Association conjointly last week, Mr. Len McKenzie stated that fully 10,000 Rugby players in New Zealand had enlisted. The figures seem to me to be stupendous, but our Old Boy City Councillor is generally sure of his ground when he makes a statement of this description. Who dares to say that the Rugby footballer is not enlisting, when he reads this paragraph? To me it iet one of the marvellous things ?jn connection with New Zealand's contribution to the fighting forces of the Empire, and proves without the shadow of a doubt that vßugby football is tbe nar tional came among the young men of the Dominion.

# » * * Sport and the War.

In allowing my thoughts to wander back over the doings of the year s one hardly knows where to let them rest, especially for the purposes of this article. The season was entered upon with some misgivings, mainly because the seriousness of the war in Europe was overshadowing everything else. Some pessimists in the community said that sport in every form- should be postponed during the currency of the war, and, although I never had that feeling myself, I was inclined to listen to the arguments to that end. But when the news came through of those famous -charges up the Gaba Tepe hills, with the undeniable fact that there were Rugby footballers at the head of those rushes, the conviction was borne home on me that the game should) be played as long as there were players to take part in- it, simplv and solely because the Rugby field is a fine training ground for the future soldier.

The Duke of _ ' Wellington is credited ■with having said that' "Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton," _ and nay impression is -that when the historian tells of the doings on the Gallipoii peninsula the names of Australian and New Zealand Rugby players will loom large on the pages of" his work. In fact, every phase of sport practised in these islands of ours in the Southern Seas . has been doing and is doing its share to help Mother England along, and, although we .may be given over to sport in times of peace, when the bugle sounds the call to arms I claim that our youths and 1 young men make better soldiers because of the way in which they have played the game, no matter whether as footballers, hockeyists, tennis devotees, cricketers, runners, cyclists, oarsmen, or any other form of sport. # * * * A Cursory Review. The entrance of three teams from the Trentham Camp helped, in my opinion, to infuse interest into the playing of the matches for the senior championship of the Wellington Rugby Union. It is hard these times to keep .the war out of one's writings^—it is hardly necessary for me to say this, probably, in view of what I have already written —but the fact remains that the appearance of our soldier boys on the Rugby field always created a lot of interest amongst the public, apart altogether from their abilities as Rugby players. When the fiat went forth that the camp at Trentham would have to be given up for the time

, being because of the outbreak of sickness there, the Rugby enthusiasts did not enthuse a great deal, although they were willing to admit that the health of the soldiers themselves was the first consideration. The presence of these three teams, as I say, added interest to the competitions, as many of the players had won for themselves the highest honours in the game in various parts of the Dominion. Several of them have won the highest honour of all since then, and their glory and achievements on the battlefield have only helped to add lustre to their name and to the game of Rugby football. * * * * Of the other teams I am not inclined to write overmuch at this stage, although I don't know how far my pen will carry me before I finish. Athletic had almost the same -team as the -previous year, W. Be'l (reported wounded) and Robinson, a promising five-eighth, being amongst those who had gone forth to battle. They were early sorted out as the champions of the year, and the prophets for once were right. I don't think, however, that they were as strong a side, as they were last season. Petone, thanks to the fact that the majority of their players were detailed for duty in the. garrison artillery at the forts, also put a strong team in the .field. James Ryan, their 28-year-old veteran, led them once again when he could be spared' from his military duties —and that was spasmodically in the early part of the season —but they, did as well as their best friends anticipated. Now that it has been proved that there is 'little necessity to man the forts, word goes round that these Petone boys are! enlisting for the bigger battles. The Wellington and Oriental teams gave of their best as soldiers, and they were considerably weakened as playing factors in consequence. Consequently they occupied a much lower position on the championship table than they did the previous season. Poneke were not much weakened —Ernie Fisher, a promising three-quarter, who lost his life at the Dardanelles, being the most noticeable player to go to the front. Others are going now —B. Algar, E. King, and J. Tilyard, to. mention a few names. The University team have been rather on the weak side during their 'history as a senior side, and big holes have been made in their ranks. I have it on good authority that, as soon as this year's examinations for_ degrees are over and done with, there will. be a host of Victoria College students bound for the Dardanelles, or wherever the soldier's calling may want them to go. The entry of the Selwyn team into the contest for the senior championship was one of the notable things of the year. These lads had done so well in the ."junior games the previous- year that they felt it was up to. them to advance a step, and they obeyed the call. They started off splendidly bv winning their first two matches, but things after that were not so pleasing with them. They, however, can comfort themselves with the assurance that they have done excellently in their first year as seniors, and,, if they stick together, will climb still higher up the ladder that leads to championship honours. * * * * The Championship Table. I. may be pardoned for bringing in here the table showing how the various teams have fared this year, especially when.. I say. that it is necessary in view of what follows. What I have written is in the nature of casual thoughts on the doings of the year, and in the tabulated statements that follow I have detailed the said doings from a statistical standpoint. This is how the teams fared in the games they played: —

The above table details all the matches played for the senior championship during the year. Owing to the Trentham camp being temporarily broken up through an epidemic of sickness, the three soldier teams had to be withdrawn from . the contest. The Rugby Union, in conformity with its by-laws', decided not to count the matches played by those fifteens, and therefore the official table differs from the above. The St. James Club entered a team for the championship, but they had to make default owingj to their inability to raise a senior fifteen, and from a variety of causes, not necessary to detail here,' the Melrose Club found themselves unable to continue, and, for the first time since 1887, did not figure in any of the matches played this season. They had a splendid playing' record, and it is more than probable that, when the war is finished, the old Newtown club -will once again come back into our football.

Winners of Senior o Championship. Championship matches were first played under the Wellington Rugby Onion m 1882, and the winners of the' trophy associated with that honour have been: — 1882—Athletic. 1883—Wellington and Gxeytown, tie. 1884—Athletic. 1885 —Wellington. 1886—Poneke. - 1887—Poneke. 1888 —Poneke. 1889—Poneke. 1890—Wellington. 1891—Athletic. 1892—Poneke. 1893—Poneke. 1894—Poneke. \ 1895—Petone. 1896—Melrose. . 1897—Melrose. 1898—Melrose. 1900—Melrose. 1901—Wellington. 1903—Poneke. 1904—Petone. ■ 1905—Petone. 1906—Petone. 1907—Petone. 1908—Melrose. 1909—Poneke. , 1910—Oriental. 1911—Athletic. 1912-^Athletic. 1913—Athletic. -: 1914 —AtKetic and Wellington, tie. 1915—Athletic. From this it will be gathered, that the Athletic team, in heading the championship table for five years in succession, have established a new record m these games. The Poneke and Petone teams have each been successful in four successive seasons, the number of 'times in which the respective teams have been champions being as follows: Poneke, 9; Athletic, 7 and a tie; Petone, 6; Melrose, 6; Wellington, 3 and two ties; Oriental, 1; Grey town, tie. **■*•*

Details of Club Tallies. Deeming it of sufficient interest, I have compiled a table showing how the scores obtained by the various teams in the senior championship have been made up. They are as follows: —

Individual Tallies. The 965 points were scored "by 116 players, as follows: —Pet-one, 19; Athletic, 17; Selwyn, 15; Poneke, 13; Oriental, 12; Wellington, 11; "University 9; Trentham A, 8; Trentham C, 7; Trentham B, 5. D. W. Madden, the Athletic centre three-quarter, heads the list of individual scores for the season, with the good tally of 56 points. Watn A. McCarlie, a fellow club player, he has the record also of scoring the most tries of the season —viz., eight—but their ■'figures are not as good in this connection as G. Heley—yet another Athletic payer—had last year,when he put eleven tries to his credit. Writing m this connection reminds me that btewart Macfarlane, that fine laa who has given his life to the Empire m the Dardanelles fighting, headed the list last year ,ch a tally of 69, and his total of points—4 tries, 17 converted tries, 7 penalty goals, and 1 mark goal—in the 1913 season is likely to stand as the re r cord score in championship matches m Wellington. Hereunder I tabulated form the scorers in matches this season: — —Scorers of Ten Points and Over. —

—Scorers of Nine Points. — S. E. Donne, W. Francis, "W. A. Churchill, J. McTaggart, H. Tancred, W. T7dy, G. Davis, X Anslow, W. MoEwan, J. Cunninghame, and W. Ryan. —Scorers of Eight Points. — A. Evensen,,. S. Cameron, and T. Sullivan. :—Scorer of Seven Points. — J. G. Kinvig. —Scorers of Six Points.— R. Barry, A. Church, J. Haydon, F. Galvin, L. ■■■ Roberts, Fred Cooper, A. Parker, J. Hedges, E. Prendeville, E. Anstis, H. N. Kerr, T. Lyons, G-. Miller and W. Burr ell. —Scorers of Five Points. — 0. Cowie, R. McDonald, Newall, and G. Heley. —Scorer of Four Points. — H. Capper. -—Scorers of Three Points. — L. Wilson, A. Cunningham©, E. Orsborn,: W. Levick, R. MeVay, Mann, Sands, T. French, I*. Weston, A. Gray, F. McGrath, R. Denize., J. Smart, Lewer, Reeves, W. Bilkey, Tunnington, Thomas, H. Malin, W. Williamson, W. Lomas, A. DeClifford, H. Price. J. Burke, W. Ryan, W. Reedy, T. Price, J. Corson, H. Nunn, W. Miller, A. Brewer, W. King, J. H. Grigg, N. F. Little, F. G. McKenna, Smith, L. Bishop, F. B. W. Goodbehere, Cullen, Oncrlev. Douail, W. Maxwell, A. Hickson, S. W. Shearer, S. Parker, T. McPherson, and A. Marshall. of Two Points.— N. Avery, W. Crewes, and Frank Cooper. * * * * Last Saturday's Game. The outstanding feature about the match between the Athletic and Trentham ; teams last Saturday was the fact that the latter was composed of players drawn from all parts of New 'Zealand, and that they were playing probably their last match before their departure for the seat of war. The fifteen was Constituted as follows: —Full-back, W. E. "CTrwiiL (Auckland); three-quarters, W. A. Gray (Auckland), G. Heley (Wellington), and) ,R. Anderson (Otago); five-eighths, F. Lovelock (Poverty Bay) and V. Inch (Auckland); half-back, P. Stubbs (Poverty Bay); forwards, B. Bernstein (Taranaki), W. E. Page

(Canterbury), D. W. Johnson (Auckland), F. Wilkinson (South Canterbury), P. Allen (Taranaki), D. P. Friel (South Canterbury) and If. McGee (Otago); wing-forward, P. Murphy (Taranaki).

The Allen mentioned above is a younger brother of "Snip" Allen, the old-time Taranaki and New Zealand representative five-eighth. B. Bernstein was a Taranaki representative "hooker," and went down in the front in many a match with M. Cane, a Taranaki player who gained a place in the New Zealand team for California, and left for the Dardanelles with one of the earlier batches of soldiers.

G. Heley was one of the Athletic Club's three-quarters early in the season, and also is Wellington's amateur sprint champion. B. Algar (Poneke Club) is also is camp, but was not available for last Saturday's match. J. Moffitt (Oriental) is also with the soldiers, but maybe he was not eager for a game these days. Both would have strengthened the side, judging by their form this season. E. Pyan (Petone)" and J. G. Einvig (Oriental) are waiting the call to go to camp, so that it will be seen that Wellington players are enlisting all right.

The game ended in the defeat of the Athletic team by 11 points to 10, the respective scores being: For Trentham, try by F. Wilkinson, and converted try and two penalty goals by P. Stubbs; for Athletic, try bv J. !L. Blackmore, mark goal by S. Wilson, and potted goal by A.. Church.

The Athletics were short of their usual team, A. E. Evensen being out of the backs, and E. Orsborn arid W. Levick out of the forwards. The game was not taken seriously by anyone—the attendance of the public being in a manner disheartening to the promoters of the crame —and rarely reached a decent standard. The thing that pleased me most was some excellent' place-kick-ing by P Stubbs, whose left foot was a big. asset for the soldier team. His shots were as -good as we have seen at the Athletic Park for some time. Wilkinson .was a fine stamp of a forward, and Gray showed up prominently, especially at five-eighth in the second spell. Taking them altogether, this Trentham team had a deal of ability scattered amongst them, and would weld into a good side, with plenty of rjlayina together. And, having said this, I do not feel inclined to comment further, and will content myself with

wishing these fellows all the glory that may await them when they get into holds with the Turks, or the Germans for the matter of that. Good luck to them all. * * * * Passing Notes. Frank Mitchinson was amongst the spectators at the Athletic Park on Saturday. He is looking brown and healthy, and was enjoying a run to town prior to starting on the busy work of the year on that Selection of his in the King Country.

, Sergeant-Major Chant in charge of the >Trentham tea in at the Athletic Park on Saturdav. Up to the present he has been acting-postmaster at the camp, and was well and favourably known to all the members of the earlier Reinforcements. Now he has got into a uniform himself, and fills it out splendidly.

George Miller, the Wellington Club and representative forward, has had a bad bout of rheumatic fever, but I am pleased to say that he is now on the right way to recovering his accustomed health and strength.

Dr. Arthur Verge, the Sydney TJniversitv full-back of a few seasons aeo, -died at Ghezir-eh, Egypt,, on the sth September, from enteric fever. He was attached to the Second Imperial Australian Force as medical officer.

"It's not often we catch you tripping," said a Rugby friend to me on Saturday. It seems I was wrong a week or two ago in saying that R. McVay did not leave the field before the end of the Athletic-Pet one match, played at Petone. McVay had a hard row to hoe that afternoon stopping the rushes of the suburban forwards. In the concluding stages he took,a spell at five-eighth; but had to give it .up, and went to the .dressing-room before the bell ran or for the finish.-

O S) 5-a a » »• »« ■go • . . & -*> ■*= g *= ..-§§• § "S S .5 .S 3.5 5 jr ■ > <= =r 3 8 .a 3 «=sOi f J fl fc h OPh Athletic 12 11 10 198 85 22 Petone ... 12 9 3 0 199 71 18 Poneke ... 12 6 5 1 160 116 13 Selwyn ... 10 5 5 0 82 116 10 Oriental 10 3 7 0 62 113 6 Trentham A 6 3 3 0 62 50 6 Trentham C 5 3 2 0 57 43 6 University 8 2 6 0 69 134 4 Trentham B 5 1 31 23 40 3 Wellington 10 1 9 0 53 192 2

.2 «.s §1 "2-i J-i 3.s H OB SO P4C5 BP4 Petoue ... 46 16 6 1 2 199 Athletic ... 48 20 2 0 2 198 Poneke ... 39 14 5 0 0 160 Seiwyn ... 19 3 4 1 1 82 Univetrsity 18 6 0 1 0 69 Oriental ... 16 5 0 0 1 62 Trentliain 4 15 4 2 1 0 62 Trentham 0 15 3 1 1 0 57 Wellington 13 4 1 1 0 53 Trentham B 5 1 2 0 0 23 234 76 23 6 6 965

T3 ' "S j? . -.' - "=* « — 2 •n o-a go so o o op H OH PkO SO MS HPD. W. Madden 8 14 0 0 1 56 E. Ryan ... 7 9 1 0 0 42 •J. Tilyard .... 5 7 - 2 0 0 35 Joe Ryan ... 3 5 2 1 Op F. Wilson ... 5 2 1 1 0 2o A. McCarlie* .8 0 0 0. 0 24 S. Wilson ... 1 4 2 0. 1 21 E. ■ Roberts .- 3 3 2 1 0 24 T. Beard ... 2 6 0 1 0. 21 E. Morris ... 6 1 0 0 0 20 E King — 1 5 2 0 0 19 T" W. Lynch... 6 0 0 0 0 18 F. Middieton 5 0 0 0 0 15 G. Anderson... 5 0 0 0 0 15 D. O'Sullivan 5 0 0 0 0 15 T. Dent ... 5 0 0 0 . 0 15 A. Wilson ... 5 0 0 0 0 15 J L. Blackmore 4 0 0 0 0 12 W. Roberts ../ 2 0 2 0 012 R. Paton ... 4 0 0 0 0 12 A. W. Israel..., 4 0 0 0 0 12 L. Beard ' ... 1 3 . 11.0 0 12 J. Moffitt ... 4 0 0 0 0 12 C. Tilyard ... 4 0 0 0 0 12 H. Hagan ... 4 0 0 .0 0 12 S. Bolton ... 4 0 0 0 0 12 W. Anderson... 1 1 2 0 0 11 B. Algar ... 2 1 1 0 0 11 H. G. Nicholls 1 0 0 0 2 11 N McPhee ... 11 1 1 ■ 0 11 H Beck ... 2 0 0 0 1 10 Jim Ryan ... 0 2 2 0 0 JO

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Bibliographic details

OUT DOOR SPORTS AND PASTIMES, Free Lance, Volume XV, Issue 797, 8 October 1915

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OUT DOOR SPORTS AND PASTIMES Free Lance, Volume XV, Issue 797, 8 October 1915

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